The Omlet Blog Archives: June 2020

Forage Treats For Your Rabbit

Why should you forage for treats to give your rabbits? Well, even if there are plenty of great pre-made treats for your pets, it’s sometimes fun to know exactly what you’re giving them. Wild plants are nutritionally balanced, high in fiber and really yummy. Apart from that, they’re also free!

Before we get going, here are some things to think about:

  • If you’re not completely sure that you have identified a plant correctly, don’t pick it. It’s useful to have photos of the plants you’re looking for at hand, and compare what you find with them. 
  • Try to avoid collecting treats for your rabbits by busy roads with lots of emissions from cars. It’s best to find spots where you’re relatively confident no pesticides or other chemicals have been used, and where cats and dogs will not have peed or pooed on the plants. 
  • If you want to you can wash your finds when you get home, but in most cases this is not necessary. If you’re introducing something new to your rabbits, start slowly and give only small amounts of the new food at the time. Some treats can upset the rabbits’ very sensitive stomachs. Also remember to only feed these greens in moderation, as a treat on top of the rabbits daily amount of pellets and hay. 

Now we’ve got that done, here are 6 plants that most people will be able to identify, that can easily be found on most country walks, and that rabbits of all sizes and ages will love!

Dandelion

Most people will be able to recognise this very common plant. Lion teeth leaves, thick, hollow stems and yellow flower heads that turn into spherical clocks after flowering. Rabbits can eat the whole plant: leaves, stems and flowers, and they are great for drying if you want to keep them for winter.

 

 

 

Stinging Nettle

The less pleasant aspect of the nettle, the sting, doesn’t deter rabbits from this lovely green. Although you will need gloves to pick the nettles, the rabbits don’t feel the sting, and will munch through both leaves and stems. Stinging nettles can be found in most hedgerows or woodland, and you will recognise them by the serrated leaves and the tassel-like flowers at the top. They also dry well for your winter supply.

Blackberries/Brambles

Blackberry bushes flower from early May with pale pink flowers that turn into small green berries that then become shiny black. Brambles grow high in hedgerows and ditches, and have prickly thorns, so be careful when picking. Rabbits can eat the stems and leaves, you don’t even need to remove the prickly bits.

 
 

Plantain (Ribwort)

Plantain grows low among grass, and has broad or long light green leaves. The leaves have three or five parallel veins running through them, and if you tear it apart it’s stringy, almost like celery. Plantain is a hit with most rabbits, and can be served both fresh and dried.

Chickweed

This is another common weed that is often found in lawns and other places with slightly moist soil. It has sleek stems that can grow up to 40cm in height, and small while flowers. The whole plant can be given to your rabbit in moderation.

 
 

Goosegrass

Goosegrass is the long hairy plant that sticks to your clothes, and is one of many types of grass that rabbits love. It spreads incredibly quickly, so shouldn’t be difficult to find, even in your own garden. Although maybe not the easiest to pick, it’s both nutritious and delicious for rabbits.


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This entry was posted in Rabbits on June 30th, 2020 by linnearask


Choose The Right Cover For Your Run

We often get asked which is the best cover for an Eglu run to keep pets comfortable all year round. Read our simple guide below so you know how to help your pets in all weathers!

Summer Shades

These shades are a thinner cover material which offers protection from the sun, without creating a tunnel where heat can build up inside the run. These are smaller than the winter covers to allow better airflow through the run for ventilation. Move the summer shade around the run to suit the time of day and your hens’ routine. You may wish to change this for a Clear or Combi Cover in summer when there’s rain on the way!

Clear Covers

The Clear Covers allow for sunlight to flood your pet’s run, while also offering protection from rain. This makes them ideal for spring and autumn, so the run is light and warm with sun, but also protected from unpredictable wind and rain. 

Combi Covers

Get the best of both worlds, with shade from the sun on one side and light coming in the other, as well as full wind and rain protection on both sides. The Combi Covers are half dark green, heavy duty cover for extreme wind and rain protection, and half clear cover to let in sunlight and warmth and to let your pets see when you are bringing them treats!

Heavy Duty Covers

For strong, hard-wearing protection against the worst of winter choose heavy duty covers. Even when the temperature drops to single figures, the rain and wind batters your pets home, or a deluge of snow covers your garden, the dark green, impenetrable heavy duty covers offer sturdy weather protection. Your chickens or rabbits will be able to hop around the Eglu run in complete peace, without getting cold, damp or wind-swept!

Extreme Temperature Covers

Chickens and rabbits are very efficient at keeping themselves warm in cold weather, and the Eglu’s twin wall insulation will assist them by keeping cool air out and warm air in, but when temperatures plummet below freezing for multiple days in a row, they may appreciate a little extra support. The Extreme Temperature Blankets and Jackets add another insulating layer, like your favourite wooly jumper, without compromising the ventilation points around the coop. 

 

 

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This entry was posted in Chickens on June 29th, 2020 by linnearask


6 Ways Keeping Chickens Will Benefit Your Garden

1. Fertiliser

Chicken manure is one of the best things you can use to improve the soil in your garden. Once composted, chicken droppings are full of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other important nutrients, and increases the soil’s ability to hold water. This means more beautiful flowers, and bigger and more delicious vegetables!

Collect your chickens’ droppings and compost for up to a year before using the manure. 

2. Pest Control

Chickens spend their days scratching around the garden in search of yummy treats. They love finding beetles, grubs, caterpillars and ticks. Sometimes they even go for those pesky slugs! This is an extremely environmentally friendly way of getting rid of pests, with the added benefit of happy and content hens!

3. Rotation

Want to create a new bed in the garden? No problem, get the chickens in to do the job for you. If there’s one thing they do well it’s tilling and turning. Spread some chicken feed where you want the soil to be moved and aerated, or leave a pile of leaves that you would like spread over a resting bed, and you can be sure that the chickens will have sorted it in half the time it would take you to source a rotavator. 

4. Free Weeding

In a similar way, if you want to clear a bed of weeds or grass, get your chickens on it. They will munch on weeds and dead matter you haven’t already removed, leaving the fun bits of gardening to you!

Although clever, chickens are however not able to differentiate weeds from the plants and seeds you actually want to keep, so it’s best to keep them off flower beds and veg patches where you are growing things you actually want. Use a good fencing to limit the chickens to certain parts of the garden. 

5. Added Calcium

One of the best things about keeping chickens is the delicious eggs they provide you with. But did you know that eggshells can be highly beneficial to your garden? Eggshells are made of calcium carbonate, and are a perfect way to introduce minerals to your soil. Calcium is essential for building cell walls, making sure the plants stay strong and healthy. 

Grind up your shells with a mortar and pestle and spread on your compost, or straight in your bed.  

6. Great Company

With chickens around you will have even more reason to spend time in the garden. It’s so much fun seeing them scratch around and hear their friendly chatter, and they are great company for any keen gardener. People even claim that being around chickens relieves stress and leads to better mental health.

So what’s stopping you? Chickens are the perfect pet you and your garden needs.

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This entry was posted in Chickens on June 26th, 2020 by linnearask


What Are Red Mites, and Why Are They a Chicken Keeper’s Worst Nightmare?

It’s red, it looks like a spider, it lives in huge colonies, and it creeps out at night to suck your chickens’ blood. As nightmares go, this one’s pretty alarming – until you realise that it’s one that you can easily wake up from. The creature in question – the Red Mite – is less than a millimetre long, and it’s not difficult to banish from your chicken coop.

The Red Mite is able to live – and feed – on a variety of hosts, including humans, given half a chance. But it is it’s fondness for wild birds that brings it into contact with one of its favourite targets – your chickens. If there are birds in the garden, there are probably Red Mites too.

Know Your Enemy

The Red Mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, is a parasite that hides in dark corners of the chicken shed and scuttles out at night in huge numbers to suck blood. When fully grown, they are about 0.75mm, with spider-like legs. Before feeding, the mites are greyish-brown rather than red – the colouring comes from the blood they suck. Once engorged, the mites scurry away back to their hiding places. They are patient, too, and have been known to survive for up to 10 months in empty chicken sheds.

Infested hens will eventually develop scabs and wounds, suffer from anaemia (caused by blood loss and manifesting in pale wattles and combs), and may begin to lose feathers. Egg production will plummet, too. If the hens are young, in severe cases the blood loss and physical shock can prove fatal. One of the problems of diagnosis is that the mites are often in hiding when you examine the bird, rather than sitting in plain view (like a louse or flea, for example). These physical signs in the bird should prompt you into action though, and checking the mites’ potential hiding places is straightforward.

If the mites appear to be living on your chickens full time, rather than disappearing in the day, you might have an outbreak of Northern Fowl Mite. Same issues, different beast – and the advice given in this article applies to these bloodsuckers too.

How to be Mightier than the Mite

Because they normally feed at night, you may not spot the mites at first. You can, however, look for their hiding places. Corners and crevices in wooden henhouses are a favourite, and under roosting perches. Once discovered, you need to zap the mini vampires with a hen-friendly anti-mite liquid or powder. There are two types of product aimed at eliminating the beasties – ones that you spray or dust on the hen house and its fittings, and another that you apply directly to the birds.

All bedding should be removed from an infested coop, and the whole structure should be washed with hot water – a power-hose is a good weapon in this battle – before being treated with an anti-mite preparation.

Once the mites have been banished, prevention is the best way of keeping control of the situation. Regular washing of the chicken shed and any other concrete, plastic or wooden areas of the chicken run will help. This is particularly important in the warmer summer months, when the mite population tends to boom.

Some chicken breeders have reported good anti-mite effects from carbon dioxide, either in the form of a ‘dry ice’ fumigation or direct spraying, but there is not yet any formal veterinary rubber-stamping of these procedures.

Another fool-proof way of banishing Red Mite is to keep your hens in a coop that doesn’t have lots of corners, nooks and crannies – i.e. something plastic rather than wooden. Plastic chicken sheds are easier to clean and keep hygienic, and the Queen of Coops is the Eglu.

So, you can’t keep the wild birds and their mites away, but you can easily stop them regaining a hold amongst your flock. Once the nightmare is banished, both you and your hens can sleep easy at night.

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This entry was posted in Chickens on June 25th, 2020 by linnearask


When is the Best Time to get a Cat?

There is only one universal rule when it comes to good timing with a new cat. Avoid introducing the furry newcomer when there’s a big party taking place, or at a time of year associated with fireworks.

Unfortunately, this one rule is often ignored. Big parties tend to take place at Christmas and birthdays. And when do people usually receive presents, including, possibly, new cats and kittens? Exactly…

The problem is that celebrations involve lots of noise and lots of people, and a cat introduced into this environment is likely to run for cover and stay in hiding for as long as possible. It can take a nervous animal several days to recover from party trauma.

The Best Feline Times

  • It is far better to introduce the newcomer when all is quiet on the domestic front. That way, the cat gets an early taste of how everyday life will be with you and your loved ones.
  • If the new cat is a birthday or Christmas present for a child, explain to them why the kitten is arriving a day or two ‘late’. The party day itself can then be a time to make the home cat-friendly. Install the scratching post, cat bed, cat flap and litter tray. Stock up on cat food and treats, and get lots of cat toys ready to go. These can all act as surrogate birthday or Christmas presents, paving the way for the new furry arrival a day or two later. Preparing your home in this way is necessary anyway, with or without the excuse of a birthday party.
  • Homes need to be cat-proofed too, with toxic house plants and vulnerable ornaments removed.
  • The new cat arrival date should be delayed until the person looking after the pet has enough time to do just that. Cats are independent animals, once they settle in, but in the early days you need to offer reassurance, a comfortable lap, and a few sessions of litter-tray training. An older cat may have been toilet trained already, but a kitten will take a while to grasp the idea.
  • If the cat is going to be spending time outdoors, it’s a good idea to bring it home when it’s not too cold outside. Although good weather can never be guaranteed, the summer months have a better chance of delivering dry and sunny conditions. The cat won’t be harmed by wind, rain or snow, but if the weather is very bad, the wet pet might decide to head for shelter away from home. If it has not been a household pet for long, it may decide to take up residence in this new abode, and tracking it down won’t always be easy.

Life Stages

  • The elderly: It’s a melancholy thought, but many cats outlive their owners. This is not a reason to avoid getting a new cat if you are elderly, but all owners should digest the fact that a cat will live 15, even 20 years, and if basic cat care is going to be an issue, it needs to be discussed. If there is someone who can help out with cat food shopping and litter tray cleaning, even if the cat owner is no longer able to carry out these tasks easily, that solves the problem. Cats are, indeed, a health asset for the elderly, with scientific research suggesting that they are greatly beneficial to mental health and happiness.
  • Infants: At the other end of the age scale, it’s recommended to avoid bringing a new cat home if there is a baby in the house. Although incredibly rare, there have been tragic stories of babies accidentally suffocated by cats. A far commoner issue is allergies – some children can develop symptoms such as asthma and skin rashes in the proximity of cats and dogs, and until you know your child is allergy-free, it is best to avoid taking the risk. And even if a child is allergic to cats, there are hypoallergenic breeds – including the Abyssinian, the Cornish Rex and the Bengal – that do not provoke the allergic reactions.
  • Children: If the new cat is for a child, it is important that there is someone else who is willing to put in some cat-care hours too. No child under the age of 12 should be given full responsibility for a cat – or indeed any pet.
  • The Inbetweenies: Between childhood and old age, there is a time when many of us plan making a new start in new jobs and new homes. If you know this kind of change is imminent, it’s best to delay getting a new cat. Acclimatising them to a new home, and then another new home soon after, is not ideal, and the cat might leave the second home in search of the first one…

So, if you’re looking for a general rule here, it’s this: You can bring a new cat home any time – as long as it’s the right time!

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This entry was posted in Cats on June 22nd, 2020 by linnearask


7 Reasons Your Dog Needs A Sofa Bed

1. Keeps your Dog Out of Drafts

You’d be surprised by how drafty a house can be if you’re low to the ground, and have your bed placed straight on the floor. Dogs’ sleep gets affected by gusts of cold air from open doors and poorly insulated windows, and we all know how important sleep is! By raising your dog’s bed off the ground, you’re keeping them off the cold floor and minimising drafts going straight over the bed.

2. Easy To Get In and Out

Many older dogs struggle with painful joints that make it difficult for them to move vertically, whether it is jumping up a step on the stairs, or getting out of a low bed. By raising the bed slightly off the floor, your dog can literally walk straight in and out whenever they please, minimising stress on the joints. This makes laying down and standing up much less painful for older dogs, and prevents future problems for younger dogs. 

3. Enhanced Airflow

With a raised sofa bed, air can circulate on all sides of the dog bed. This airflow also keeps the bed more hygienic, preventing mould and mildew from forming in damp areas, and it’s super easy to wipe the surfaces of the Fido Dog Sofa Frame with a damp cloth and a dog-safe disinfectant if needed. The airflow also helps your dog stay cool in summer and warm in winter. 

4. Improves Quality of Sleep

Sofa Beds reduce the amount of debris that gets in and around your dog’s bed. Dirt and dust can irritate your pet and make the bed less comfortable, resulting in poorer quality of sleep. An elevated bed also provides firm, even support for your dog, so that you can be sure they get their well earned beauty sleep. 

5. More Space For All

Free up some space on your sofa by giving your dog their own! Although snuggles on the sofa is one of the perks of being a dog owner, there are days when you both just want your own space, and you won’t feel bad about it if you know your pup has their own sofa bed to be lazy on.

6. Makes Sunbathing Easier

If you have a dog that just loves sleeping in the sun, it’s great to be able to move the bed out into the garden without having to worry about damp fabric. The Sofa Bed can be lifted onto the patio or even your lawn, so that your dog gets a truly comfortable place to enjoy the sun.

7. A Throne for the King or Queen

A dog that runs your life during the day should not have to settle for a blanket on the floor at night – give your sovereign ruler the throne they deserve! 

 

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This entry was posted in Dogs on June 20th, 2020 by linnearask


Spoil Your Pet With Their Own Sofa Today – Now £20 Off

Reduce drafts, dirt and disturbances to improve your pet’s quality of sleep by raising their bed off the ground with the stylish Fido and Maya Sofa Frames. At the moment you get £20 off all Sofa Frames, so it’s the perfect opportunity to spoil your pet with their very own sofa!

Terms and Conditions
Promotion of £20 off sofa frames runs from 18/06/20 – midnight 23/06/20. No promo code needed, discount has already been applied. Includes Fido Dog Sofa Frame Small, Fido Dog Sofa Frame Medium, Maya Cat Sofa Frame Small and Maya Cat Sofa Frame Medium. Excludes beds without sofa frame. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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This entry was posted in Cats on June 18th, 2020 by linnearask


Cat Tail Facts

A cat’s signature move is the slinky walk with an upright tail. Intriguingly, no other cat species walks like this, and it is not known exactly when pet cats first adopted the posture.

The domestic cat’s ancestor, the African wildcat, hooked up with humans more than 10,000 years ago. They probably adopted us, rather than the other way round, attracted by the surplus of rodents nibbling away at our grain stores. It seems pretty certain that the feline freeloaders soon adapted their body language – tails included – just to please us, quickly securing their place on the sofa.

The following cat-of-nine-tails facts tell you everything you need to know about your pet cat’s swishing tail.

1 – Balancing Act 

Cats have fantastic balance. Their tails play a major role in this skill, acting as a counterweight when puss is ‘tightrope walking’ on narrow walls or ledges. The tail also helps cats run and change direction with great agility – and without stumbling. Next time you get the chance, watch a cat run and turn – if a human took some of those feline twists and turns at a similar pace, they would simply fall over.

2 – Tails Tell Tales

 Cats communicate with their tails, sending out subtle signals. The most familiar signal is the upright tail, a sign of a happy cat. In moments of great pleasure, the upright tail will quiver at the tip. This is not to be confused with the twitching tail of a resting cat, which means she’s irritated. Once the cat is on her feet and the tail is swinging from side to side, she’s switched from annoyance to anger, so watch out!

3 – Let us Prey

When they’re stalking prey, cats tend to keep their tails low and still, but they may still flick and twitch in excitement as the moment of pouncing draws near. If the hunt is unsuccessful, the tail will twitch restlessly in irritation.

4 – No Tail to Tell 

Some breeds, including the Manx, are born without tails, due to a dominant gene. Two tailless Manx cats should never be allowed to breed, however, as a combination of the two dominant genes brings severe health problems to the kittens. The curly tail of the Bobtail breeds doesn’t come with the same potential health problems as the Manx cat gene. Both the Manx and the Bobtails seem to have learnt to balance pretty well without a classic cat tail.

5 – When the Tail Goes Cold

A cat that has lost its tail in an accident, or has injured it in a door or traffic accident, is definitely handicapped. It will not be able to balance as well as before or send out those tail-twitching signals. It is still capable of leading happy life, though – owners just have to look for other body language details to read their pet’s mood.

6 – Inside Story 

Cat’s tails have between 19 and 23 vertebrae, depending on the breed (and not counting the tailless Manx!) This represents around 10% of the total number of bones in the cat’s body. These vertebrae give the tail its whiplash flexibility, held together with complex muscles, tendons and ligaments.

7 – Ailing Tails 

If your cat is feeling unwell, you can usually see the signs in its tail. It won’t be held upright or twitching excitedly like before. If you notice that the behaviour of your pet’s tail has changed, take it as a sign that she needs a health check. Some cats are prone to dermatitis, sometimes brought on by fleas. This can often be seen in inflamed areas in the region where the tail joins the rump. Some hormonal problems can result in inflammation in the tail too.

8 – Upstanding Felines

The ability to walk with an upright tail is actually unique to domestic cats. All other members of the cat family walk with the tail down, horizontal, or tucked safely between the legs.

9 – Tail End

Cats raise their tails to tell us they’re happy and relaxed, but when prowling amongst other cats the raised tail signal is an invite to come and investigate. Other cats will sniff a cat whose tail is in the air.

It is widely thought that purring is something cats invented just for us – and perhaps that upright happy tail is another one of the ways they won a place in our hearts and homes.

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This entry was posted in Cats on June 10th, 2020 by linnearask


What Is a Broody Hen, and How Do You Stop Her Being Broody?

Most hens lay their eggs with minimum fuss. They might make a bit of noise to announce their egg-laying achievement, but will soon return to the daily business of exploring and scratching for food. Some hens, however, are a bit more moody. Broody, to be more accurate.

A broody hen is one who sits on her egg with every intention of staying there until it has hatched – no matter whether the egg is fertilised or not. This is very useful if you want to hatch some chicks, but otherwise it can be a problem.

The cause of broodiness is linked to body heat, backed up by maternal instincts. Hens who are cooped up together in a hot henhouse may suddenly heat up to a level that makes them think “I’m going to hatch an egg!”. Certain breeds seem more susceptible to broodiness than others, with the Silkies and Cochins being particularly moody-broody.

Signs of Broodiness

A broody hen undergoes a personality change. The most obvious sign of this is her refusal to leave the nesting box. She will sit there with the air of a bird who will happily wait until Doomsday for the egg to hatch. This misplaced dedication will also make her grumpy and liable to peck or cluck angrily if you try to move her.

When you do manage to oust her from the box, she’ll simply head back there again and resume her brooding. Once she feels established in her new maternal role, she will fluff out her feathers and may begin to self-pluck her chest feathers to line the nest.

How to Stop a Hen Being Broody

Appearances can be misleading. The hen may look as though she will sit in the box for eternity, but in reality she will only stay there – usually – for three weeks. This is the length of time it takes a chicken egg to hatch.  This means, if space allows, you can simply let her brood for 21 days, and then the mood will lift and she will return to business as usual.

Having said that, you need to make sure the hen gets food and drink during this time, and this may involve forcibly removing her from the nest box and shutting it off until she has taken refreshments. Wearing sturdy gloves is a good precaution when doing this, to make sure you don’t get pecked.

Dipping the hen’s rear end in cool water is a common way of bringing broodiness to an end. Again, the condition is linked to body heat, so a sudden cooling of the rump will usually do the trick. The method is unsubtle – you take the hen and dunk her hind portions into the water for ten seconds.

A related anti-broody trick is to place a packet of frozen peas or sweetcorn kernels underneath the hen in the nestbox. Crushed ice cubes in a bag will do the trick, too. This has the dual impact of cooling the chicken down and making life in the nest box too uncomfortable for brooding.

Sometimes a simple obstacle such as a plant pot or a couple of bricks will have the desired effect. If the hen can’t access the nest box, she can’t sit there and brood.

Some owners use a so-called ‘broody enclosure’ to break the habit. This is a wire cage or crate, in which the chicken is placed along with food and water. The wire is slightly uncomfortable, and will also help cool her down. After three days, this gentle form of solitary confinement will usually break the broody habit. The signs that the brood-mood is over are obvious – the hen will stop fluffing out her feathers and will stalk around the cage, rather than sitting and brooding.

Then again, you could purchase some fertilised eggs and let the broody hen get on with it. If you want chicks, this is by far the easiest, and most natural way of producing them – under the fluffy belly of a broody hen.

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This entry was posted in Chickens on June 10th, 2020 by linnearask


Could You Be The Next Omlet Ambassador? Hear What It’s Like!

If you own and love an Omlet product and like talking to other people about your pets, then becoming an Omlet Ambassador will definitely suit you! 

The Omlet Ambassador programme offers a really great way for people to not only see the products they are interested in, but also ask an owner all about it, like a live, interactive review!

If you speak to someone that then goes on to buy, you will get commission on their order. On top of that, Omlet customers in other countries have found lots of like minded friends through the Omlet Ambassador programme so it’s a great way to meet people who share your hobby in the area!

We spoke to two of our US ambassadors, Sueellen and Jennifer, about their experience of being an ambassador, and this is what they had to say:


Tell us about your chickens and your setup!

SE:
I am fortunate enough to have 2 different communities of very sweet chickens! We have 8 chickens right outside our side door and we have 23 chickens in our pasture in the backyard. We have had this arrangement for 3 years.

J:
The first is five barred rock layers. We have had them for about a year. They are in the Omlet Coop with a run and an outdoor enclosure. They get along well with each other, but won’t accept any new members. They are good sized birds but do fine in the space we have. We could increase the size of the flock no problem in the coop setup that we have.

We also have 1 white silkie, 1 blue “satin” silkie, and 2 silkie mixes (probably silkie/polish – the white one is a sizzle, the black one not sure). They are all hens except the satin. They lay but are really pets. We have had the polish/ silkies for about a year and the silkie for 6 months. The white silkie is a hen but thinks she is a rooster – his/her name is Juancho. She sings and talks all day long. Quite a character. The blue satin silkie is new to the flock. We have to be a bit more careful with them in cold weather  and rain because they are so small, get wet easily and cannot fly. During the day we keep them with our Kune Kune boars Max and Luigi who help keep them safe and warm.

What do you like about your Omlet products?

SE:
About 10 years ago we got our first chickens and the entire family (all 6 of us) loved having them. We loved their darling and hilarious personalities, and we loved getting the beautiful eggs as well. But over a short time we began to lose our chickens to many predators! It was heartbreaking to say the least! Fortunately, one of my daughters discovered the amazing Omlet products at a trade show. She told me about the Omlet coops and the pet runs and various other products! I fell in love immediately!

I love love love the way the Omlet products look. They are beautifully designed and are very easy to clean and maintain! 3 years later my coops look new! I love the pet runs especially, as they can be smaller or larger depending on your flock needs. I love that I can walk into the runs without bending down or getting on the ground. This feature enables me to easily feed, water, clean, visit and bond with my flock!

J:
We love the Omlet coop and enclosure. It’s very easy to keep clean and we have had (so far) almost no hygiene/sanitation issues. I believe that the plastic helps minimize this vs. wood or porous material. The coop is warm in the winter and stays cool in the summer even in our extreme heat. We have a lot of predators and so far, no one has been able to get in. They seem to have a hard time even getting on the coop because of the rounded roof so that is an extra plus. I also like that the product is simple – just three levers to use – simple. Everyone seems really happy and the barred rocks average an egg a day!

What’s your experience with being an Omlet ambassador?

SE:
I love being an Omlet Ambassador! I love all the products and the versatility they offer! I love my chickens! They are a sweet, hilarious and adorable part of our family. It is super fun to collect farm fresh healthy beautiful eggs everyday!

It was a very natural progression to become an Omlet Ambassador because I love the products, and I really enjoy sharing my experience, my knowledge and my love of chickens! I enjoy showing other chicken enthusiasts or others just curious about chickens our set-up!

J:
I decided to become an Omlet ambassador because I really believe in the product and my interactions with the company have been very positive – seems like a nice group of people out trying to sell a great product.

What does a normal visit or contact from a prospect look like?

SE:
Often a person considering getting chickens and/or a chicken coop will contact me by email with a few questions. We begin a dialogue and set up a visit for them to see the fabulous Omlet products at work! We choose a time convenient for both of us! Once people see the chickens and the Omlet Coops, they can’t wait to get started with their own amazing Omlet community!

J:
Pre virus, we had a few visits – everyone was very well informed (people really do their research!) and mainly wanted to see the product up close. I think part of it is the cost – it is expensive and therefore people want to make sure it’s the right thing before committing.  Recently, we have had a lot of inquiries from people who are looking at getting chickens for the first time, probably driven to it by the high cost of eggs here in California. Some of them say they are a bit intimidated by the whole thing and again, want to make sure they are doing the right thing. We are definitely not chicken experts but the Omlet products help keep things simple – I am very confident that our ladies will be safe and clean, which seems to be half the battle!


If you think you would want to become an Omlet ambassador, send us an email and we will send you all the information you might need!

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This entry was posted in Pets on June 9th, 2020 by linnearask


6 Steps to Starting Seeds in Your Girls’ Eggshells

 

Next time you’re about to throw away your empty egg shells, spare the food waste bin and keep hold of them. Many people use crushed up egg shells in gardening to add calcium to the soil, however we have another great way you can use egg shells to add to your garden. Many propagators or seed starter tubs are made out of plastic, which isn’t great for the environment. Why not use your empty egg shells to start your next batch of seeds?! It’s so quick and easy to do!


1. Firstly rinse out the shells, and then let them dry.

2. Once dry, fill the egg shells halfway with compost and sit them in the egg carton.

3. Sprinkle a little water on the compost and then add your chosen seeds to the compost.

4. Spread a thin layer of compost on top and drizzle a little bit more water.

5. Then place in a sunny spot indoors – a window ledge is a great place to start seeds.

6. Keep watering your eggshell seeds each night, and after a few days you should start to see them sprout!


Once they’re too big for the shell then transfer to a bigger spot to continue growing indoors or outdoors depending on the chosen seeds (see packet for details).

 

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This entry was posted in Crafting on June 4th, 2020 by linnearask


Get 25% off Peach Bolster Beds for a limited time only!

🍑 Summer Special! 🍑

Get 25% off Peach Bolster Beds for a limited time only. The premium memory foam mattress is the best you can give your dog or your cat; it moulds around their body and gives unparalleled support for a deep, dreamy sleep. This stylish peach hue is the perfect summer shade to brighten your home!

Terms and Conditions
Promotion runs from 04/06/20 – midnight 09/06/20, while stocks last. No promo code needed, discount has already been applied. Includes all Peach Bolster Dog Beds and Peach Bolster Cat Beds. Excludes all Bolster Beds in Grey and Green. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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This entry was posted in Offers and promotions on June 4th, 2020 by linnearask


Doggy Sleeping Positions and What They Mean

On the side

The most common sleeping position for dogs is on their side with the legs pointing straight out. Sometimes dogs will fall asleep in a different position, but as soon as the muscles relax and the dog starts to dream, they will automatically roll onto their side. 

This position exposes their vital organs, so a dog who prefers to sleep on its side is likely relaxed and comfortable, and feels safe with his or her surroundings. 

As the legs are free to move in this sleeping position, it is likely that you will see the dog’s legs twitch and kick as they dream. 

If your dog favours this position, make sure that their bed is big enough to accommodate their whole body, including the outstretched legs. The Omlet Bolster Beds come in three sizes, so you can be sure to find one that fits your dog!

Curled up in a ball

This is a common sleeping position for wild dogs, who are much more vulnerable than our spoiled pet pooches. The vital organs are protected, the body heat is retained, and the dog can move quickly if needed.

Dogs that are in an unfamiliar location or experience something that is worrying them will often sleep in this position. However, if your dog prefers to roll up like a fox for nap time it doesn’t necessarily mean that he or she is worried or uncomfortable, they might just like being snuggled in. 

Super Pup Pose

In this position, the dog is on its tummy, with all four legs stretched out. This is very common with puppies who need regular naps, but also always want to be ready to play at any given moment, as it’s very easy to get up and going. 

The Super Pup is almost completely limited to napping; very few dogs spend a whole night in this position. It’s also much more common with smaller dogs like terriers and toy breeds, possibly because their limbs are shorter.

On the back, legs up in the air

If your dog is cold, they will curl up into a ball. In a similar way, exposing the belly and spreading out will cool them down. Exposing the tummy, where the fur is much thinner, as well as the sweat glands on the paws are two of your dog’s best tools to stay cool. 

Comfortable as it may be, it is however a very vulnerable position. The vital organs are exposed and it will take the dog much longer to get up and go in case of danger than if they had their legs on the ground. If your dog chooses this position even when it’s not boiling hot, it is likely that he or she feels extremely relaxed and comfortable.

Close to a human or other pet

Many dogs love falling asleep next to another living thing, preferably really, really close. This behaviour comes from their time as puppies, before they could regulate their own body temperature and had to snuggle up to their siblings to stay warm. 

Although grown dogs don’t need you (or the cat) as a heat source, they have come to associate sleeping next to something warm and breathing with comfort and security. You can be sure that your dog is completely relaxed in your company if he or she decides to sleep right next to you.

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This entry was posted in Dogs on June 3rd, 2020 by linnearask