The Omlet Blog Category Archives: Rabbits

Ultimate rabbit and guinea pig checklist 

Thinking about adding a small pet to your family? Rabbits and guinea pigs require similar accommodations, so whether you’re considering bunnies or cavies to your family, your shopping list will look the same. From hutches and runs, to toys and feed, we’ve got the ultimate rabbit and guinea pig checklist

Guinea pig on the Zippi platforms in the Zippi run

Caring for rabbits and guinea pigs 

Rabbits and guinea pigs are both small pets that are great for children and families. They can be housed indoors or outdoors, and are fun and easy to care for. With the appropriate setup and care, rabbits and guinea pigs can live 8-10 years. 

Rabbits and guinea pigs can be kept together, but their nutritional needs and communication methods are different, so it’s best to have separate setups for each species. They’re both social animals and need the companionship of others of their own kind. So, when planning your pets’ future home, make sure you’re thinking of room for two. 

Hutches 

Traditionally, rabbit and guinea pig hutches have been made of wood, but this poses a problem for several reasons. Both rabbits and guinea pigs have teeth that grow continuously, and they need to gnaw in order to keep their incisors from overgrowing. Wooden hutches are tempting to chew on, and treated lumber can be toxic to pets. They’re also drafty, don’t hold up in the elements, and absorb moisture and odours. 

Eglu Go Rabbit Hutches and Eglu Go Guinea Pig Hutches are: 

  • Made of pet-safe plastic  
  • Twin insulated for optimal internal temperatures
  • Draft-free while maintaining ventilation 
  • Easy to clean in just a few minutes
  • Built to last a lifetime 

Starting out with a plastic rabbit or guinea pig hutch will set you and your pets up for success from the first day. 

Bedding 

The bedding you use inside of your rabbits’ or guinea pigs’ hutch mostly comes down to personal preference. Typical bedding options include: 

  • Pine shavings or pellets
  • Aspen shavings
  • Recycled paper (this resembles loose cotton) 
  • Straw 

Breeds of rabbits with long hair like Lionheads or Angoras need recycled paper or pine pellets as bedding – straw and shavings will get tangled in their coats. Similarly, breeds of guinea pigs with long hair like Peruvians or Shelties should not be kept on shavings or straw bedding. 

Outdoor space 

Rabbits and guinea pigs need plenty of space outside of their hutch to stretch their legs and explore. Rabbits have lots of energy, so an outdoor rabbit run is essential to helping them stay healthy and happy. Likewise, guinea pigs need an outdoor guinea pig run to stay fit, as they can be prone to obesity if they don’t have enough space to exercise. 

Omlet’s rabbit and guinea pig runs have attached floor panels to prevent tunnelling — which is of particular concern for rabbits. The entire run is constructed of heavy-duty welded wire to keep your pets safe outside, and they can be expanded for even more space. 

Toys 

Part of the joy of having rabbits or guinea pigs is watching them play. And the best rabbit and guinea pig toys are those that encourage their natural behaviours. The Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System mimics burrows in the wild that bunnies would naturally gravitate toward. And, guinea pigs in the wild will utilize tunnels created by other animals, so they’ll appreciate having a tunnelling system to run through or hide inside of. 

Other rabbit and guinea pig run accessories like shelters and play tunnels make perfect places for your pets to find solace from the sun or to catch a quick nap. Since both rabbits and guinea pigs are prey animals, they’re always on high alert for potential predators. Because of this, they startle easily and need shelters to retreat into quickly if they perceive danger. Having these covers placed throughout the run will help your rabbits or guinea pigs feel much more at ease. 

Zippi Rabbit and Guinea Pig Platforms give your pets a place to interact with you on your level, and to view the world from another vantage point. Offer treats on the platform in a Caddi Rabbit and Guinea Pig Treat Holder, or train your rabbits and guinea pigs on the elevated surface. The space beneath the platforms offers additional shade and shelter, and the non-slip ramps help get your guinea pigs’ legs moving and satisfies your rabbits’ need to explore. 

Food  

Both rabbits and guinea pigs need quality, timothy hay-based pelleted feed as the main source of their nutrition. However, unlike rabbits, guinea pigs can’t manufacture their own vitamin C, so commercially available guinea pig pellets should be fortified with this essential nutrient. Commercial rabbit feed typically does not contain supplemental vitamin C. This is part of why housing rabbits and guinea pigs separately is so important – too much vitamin C isn’t good for rabbits, and too little vitamin C can be deadly for guinea pigs. 

Many rabbits and guinea pigs won’t overeat if their food is left out for them, but if you notice your pet getting on the thicker side, follow the feeding instructions on the feed bag. Guinea pigs especially can be prone to becoming overweight, so a free-choice pellet diet may not be suitable for them. Rabbits can also put on unnecessary weight, so be sure to assess their body condition regularly. When in doubt, ask your veterinarian if your rabbit or guinea pig is overweight, and if so, see what feeding suggestions they have to offer. 

Rabbits and guinea pigs also need free-choice access to timothy hay. This not only keeps their digestive system working as it should, but also helps them keep their teeth trimmed. Timothy hay won’t cause rabbits or guinea pigs to become overweight, so it’s safe (and necessary) for it to be available at all times. 

 

Omlet and your rabbits and guinea pigs 

Keeping rabbits and guinea pigs is a fun experience for all ages. With our Eglu Go Rabbit and Guinea Pig Hutches, caring for your pets doesn’t have to be a chore. You can completely clean your rabbits’ or guinea pigs’ home in just minutes – leaving you plenty of time to spend socialising and playing with them. Use Zippi Rabbit and Guinea Pig Platforms to bring you closer than ever, and watch them display their natural behaviours with the Zippi Tunnel System for an unforgettable experience for you and your pets.

 Children playing in the Zippi setup with their pet rabbits

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This entry was posted in Guinea Pigs


How to pick the right hutch for your rabbit or guinea pig

How to pick the right hutch for your rabbit or guinea pig

Wondering how to pick the right hutch for your rabbit or guinea pig? It’s easy to get bogged down by all of the choices available for potential and current cavy or rabbit owners. We’ll help you decide how to pick the right home for your small pets, and how to help them enjoy it to the fullest. 

Picking the perfect hutch

There are some important factors to consider when picking the right hutch for your rabbit or guinea pig. The materials, size, and placement of their home will greatly influence how you care for your furry friends, so need careful consideration. With these guidelines, you’ll be able to select a hutch that fits all of your needs. 

Indoor or outdoor 

Rabbits and guinea pigs can be kept indoors, but they are just as happy outdoors in an insulated hutch with a spacious run to give them plenty of room to run and play. If left to roam the house, rabbits and guinea pigs will happily find cords, wires, baseboards, or other items to chew on. And while they can be litter box trained, you’ll likely be sweeping up fecal pellets on an hourly basis. An outdoor setup makes cleanup a breeze, and you won’t need to worry about your pets nibbling on something they shouldn’t. 

Housing your rabbits or guinea pigs outdoors year round is not only possible, but made easy with insulated hutches. Rabbit and guinea pig hutch weather protection can be added as an additional layer of insulation during frigid temperatures, and run covers provide shade and protection from the rain. 

It should be noted that not all rabbit breeds and guinea pig breeds will thrive outdoors — especially in extreme climates. Guinea pigs in particular are suited to a milder climate, whereas many rabbit breeds do well outdoors. However, bringing them in and out is not good practice, as they will acclimatize to one or the other and won’t cope well with sudden changes in temperature. Breeds that require careful observation when housed outdoors: 

Rabbits 

Guinea Pigs 

Consider size 

Rabbits and guinea pigs are very social animals, and need friends of their own kind. While you can keep rabbits and guinea pigs together successfully, they each have different dietary needs and require their own space, so it’s best to start out with one species at a time, and always in pairs. Spayed and neutered males and females are good pairings, as are same-sex pairings (though rabbits should always be spayed or neutered in same-sex pairings to avoid territorial scuffles). 

A home for your rabbits and guinea pigs is much more than just a hutch for shelter and sleeping — they should also have a run large enough for them to run and play in. As with other pets, both rabbits and guinea pigs benefit from the most space possible. Providing extra space through Zippi Tunnel Systems and Zippi Play Pens gives you an opportunity to customize your pets’ setup and offer them plenty of space outside of their hutch without sacrificing safety. 

Give yourself some space 

Don’t forget to factor in spending time with your rabbits or guinea pigs when choosing their hutch. Give yourself plenty of space to access their food and water for easy refills, and space in the run to spend time with them. If crawling or reaching into a run won’t be feasible for you, consider adding a rabbit and guinea pig playpen to their setup for easy access and quality time together. A Walk In Run is also a great addition if you have space, as it makes spending time with your small pets particularly comfortable, and gives easy access for cleaning or for switching their set up around for variety in their play and exercise.    

Materials matter 

Traditionally, rabbit and guinea pig hutches have been made from wood. It’s a readily available, inexpensive material that gets the job done. But, over time wood will rot, shingled roofs will need repairing or replacing, and hardware cloth will pull away from wood staples. And, wood is a very enticing material for rabbits and guinea pigs to gnaw on, which poses a risk not only to the structural integrity of the hutch, but to your pets’ health as well. Treated wood can be toxic when ingested, and splinters or large pieces of wood can cause obstructions in your pets’ digestive tract. Wood also absorbs ammonia from urine, and is difficult to keep hygienic, even with lining such as card or paper, as this too will soak through and be shredded by busy paws. 

Plastic rabbit and guinea pig hutches don’t rot, warp, need re-roofing, or pose a gnawing risk to your pets. They’re weather resistant, don’t absorb moisture or odours, and can last a lifetime. And, instead of hardware cloth held in place with staples, the attached runs of Omlet’s rabbit and guinea pig hutches are made of heavy duty welded steel mesh that are held in place with strong, weather resistant clips. The Eglu Go Rabbit and Guinea Pig Hutch is easy to clean, and can be moved with ease with the addition of optional wheels and handles. Over time, this makes opting for an Eglu Go a great investment – financially but also in terms of time. With a slide out try you can simply wipe clean, you will be able to keep their hutch shipshape in a matter of minutes. 

Accessorize their home 

Once you’ve picked out your rabbits’ or guinea pigs’ hutch and run, it’s time to accessorize. Elements like treat holders, Zippi Platforms, and shelters and play tunnels are all ways to keep your small pets entertained, engaged, and enriched in their environment. They also help you interact with your pets on a whole new level, and build the bonds between you that last a lifetime. 

Omlet and your rabbits and guinea pigs 

We didn’t want ordinary hutches for extraordinary pets — so we created rabbit and guinea pig products that defy the norm. Our products also aim to bring you closer than ever to these animals that have captured the hearts of so many. From easy to clean hutches, spacious outdoor runs, and the one of a kind Zippi tunnel system, you’ll be amazed at how fun and intuitive it can be to interact with your rabbits and guinea pigs.  

How to pick the right hutch for your rabbit or guinea pig

 

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Omlet meets: Shell, Bagel & Brioche

“We do a running commentary of what we think they’re saying – we have a laugh as a family.”

Ready to make room for rabbits? Shell Mills takes us through a day caring for these adorable yet naturally anxious animals. 

Omlet meets Shell Mills and her children caring for their pet rabbit

In a cat and dog world, what made you pick rabbits as pets?

Well, we have got a dog actually, but my first pets were rabbits and I always loved them. My husband and I had a dwarf lop together too, before we had kids. Then from about the age of five, our daughter, Valli began asking for one. We knew it was only a matter of time before we agreed. We thought she was too young – we said she had to be able to be responsible first. We said seven, then the years flew by and suddenly she was seven, so we had to say yes!

I bet she was thrilled! How did you go about getting them?

We made it a surprise – we’d been trying frantically to find some that would be old enough at the right time to tie in with her birthday. We’d researched reputable breeders and sources and we knew our local garden center had some coming, but they arrived when we were on holiday, so we had to get in touch from abroad to reserve ours. 

The next step was buying a hutch – but I already knew we would get an Eglu Go. Our local primary school had an Omlet coop for their chickens – and I loved it. I looked online and once I knew Omlet made rabbit hutches, my decision was made. We managed to set them up in their Eglu for her birthday. It’s fantastic. We move their whole set up around and they save us from mowing the lawn! We often talk about chickens too – we might get some down the line!  

What did she name them?

Bagel & brioche – after her favourite bread products!

Brilliant. And how does she get on with caring for them? There’s a misconception that rabbits are low maintenance – actually, they need a fair bit of looking after and are very sociable.

Yes, that’s true. Well, we definitely didn’t jump into it – it had been ten years since our dwarf lop and we did a lot of research. It’s better understood now that you shouldn’t have one rabbit – you need to have two, ideally from a young age to help them bond. They need daily attention too – they thrive on contact and are so playful and sociable. 

There were other factors we hadn’t considered initially too – yearly vaccines, pet insurance, neutering or spaying – people might think it’s just a rabbit, but they come with responsibility and costs. There are so many extras. Then there’s what to do when you go away – we’re lucky, we have my parents nearby and they help us out. 

What advice would you give to prospective rabbit owners?  

Well, to do your research and understand their needs. You need to clean them out frequently – the Eglu is a real game changer in that sense. But also, consider all the costs and time you’ll need carefully before you commit. 

What are the best bits about having rabbits? 

I asked Valli these questions, as I wanted her input and her answer was, they are so cute, and they give the best cuddles! I do think it’s great to teach kids responsibility – how to care for something every day, when it’s sunny and when it’s raining. Vali is great with them and has a routine. She even brings in their water bottle to clean it with a little brush. 

I think something you might not think of beforehand is the pleasure of just observing them – we love watching the two of them together. They’re so clever and the way they play together is just lovely. It’ll be wet and chilly, but they love being outside anyway, and they’ll be all cozied up under their run cover, sniffing the air, watching the rain. We do a running commentary of what we think they’re saying – we have a laugh as a family. 

Whenever we go out, they come running over. Valli gets inside their run with them – it’s great for that. Not all rabbits enjoy being handled, but ours always have been and they’re so relaxed with it and will sit and cuddle peacefully on your lap. Our dog, Percy was a bit excited when we first got them, but he’s so unbothered now; he’ll potter over and they hop up and then they touch noses through the run!

Ha! That is very sweet. So, what does a typical day caring for the buns look like?

Bagel and Brioche start their day with Valli or Daddy going out to feed them, which means a small amount of pellets, topping up their hay, and giving them fresh water.

They have an attached Omlet run with an extension, so we see them running around throughout the day in the different sections. We just love watching them and seeing their movements, going through the tunnels and jumping on top of things – they love doing that.

Valli and our other children will go out and see them after school, and we go out again later to feed them and top up hay and water, but we don’t shut them in at night. It’s the great thing with the Omlet setup. With the underfloor mesh it’s fox proof, so they can come in and out as they please. 

We refresh their bedding regularly and at weekends they come out into their open playpen and the kids go in there with them. That’s when we give their hutch a full, deep clean out. Sometimes they come into the house and explore while we’re doing that. 

A few times a week Valli might take them treats from our vegetable garden. This time of year we only have broccoli and kale left, which they love. Then a couple of times a week we move them around the garden for a change of scenery! It’s a nice routine. Valli loves it all and does it happily – apart from sometimes, when it’s absolutely tipping it down! Then I step in and help out. They are her rabbits, but having pets is always a family activity really.

Omlet meets Shell Mills and her children caring for rabbits in Omlet Zippi tunnels and playpens

 

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Things to know before getting a rabbit

Child and woman playing with rabbit in the Omlet Zippi playpen

Thinking about adding a rabbit to your family? Rabbits make fun and interesting pets, and with the right setup and routine, they can live a long and happy life, bringing you joy for years to come. But there are a few things to know before getting a rabbit – from how many and what kind, to how they’re housed and what to feed them, here’s everything you need to know before bringing home a bunny.

Rabbits need a friend

First and foremost, rabbits are social animals that need the companionship of other rabbits. In the wild, rabbits live in large groups that form colonies, but domesticated rabbits are content with having just one friend. Opposite gender pairings introduced at a young age usually form the best bunny bonds, but it’s possible to slowly introduce two grown rabbits, or those of the same gender.

All male rabbits should be neutered, even if there are no females around. This is because males can become territorial and injure each other in testosterone-fueled duels. Similarly, all females should be spayed to help minimize moodiness and territorial displays. Spaying females also prevents uterine cancer and phantom pregnancies.

Once bunnies are bonded, they should never be separated unless absolutely necessary. This is especially true for same gender pairings, as they can become territorial when they are reintroduced – even after a brief time apart. Once bonded, rabbits that live together constantly will be very close, and you’ll be able to witness their adorable snuggling, grooming, and playtime antics.

Types of rabbits

There are several breeds of rabbits to choose from. Some have erect ears, while others have lopped (floppy) ears, some breeds like the Flemish Giant are large and some like the Netherland Dwarf are small. Breeds like Angora rabbits have long, thick fur, while breeds like the Rex rabbit have short hair.

Whichever breed or breeds you choose, make sure they’re suitable for your climate and lifestyle. Breeds with thick hair will tolerate cold temperatures much better than hot climates, and large rabbits need plenty of space to stretch their long legs. Select and research a few breeds you’re interested in, and then determine what type of setup your yard can accommodate.

Bunny behaviours

There are a few behaviours that bunnies have that new owners might not be prepared for. Here are some common characteristics and behaviours from rabbits that owners should keep in mind.

Digging

All rabbits dig. Bunnies have carried over their need to burrow from their wild ancestors. If allowed to do so, they will happily dig their own tunnels in your yard, their enclosure, or your carpet. All outdoor rabbit enclosures should have wire along the bottom to prevent your bunnies from tunnelling out, and they should never be left unsupervised while playing in the house. Dig boxes made with dirt, shredded paper, or other materials can be created for your rabbits for them to satisfy this urge.

Ever-growing teeth

Rabbits have teeth that never stop growing. Because of this, they need access to apple wood chews and timothy hay at all times. By gnawing and chewing on these, they’ll keep their teeth filed down and in check. If left to grow, a rabbit’s teeth can cause issues when eating and drinking, and can even grow into their jaw, creating painful puncture wounds and abscesses.

Thumping

This sound is unmistakable – two powerful rabbit feet coming down together in a very audible thump. It’s a quick sound made by your rabbit to let you know they are feeling threatened or uncomfortable. It doesn’t always convey aggression, but a thump is nevertheless a warning that they are not pleased with the situation they’ve found themselves in. Take caution with a rabbit that is thumping at you, and change tactics to make them feel more at ease.

Exercise

Bunnies need as much space as possible to run around and stretch their powerful legs. You may find your rabbit performing some theatrics like getting the “zoomies” – a sudden burst of energy on display by them running in a repetitive pattern. There’s also the bunny “binky”, which is an adorable twisting hop motion that some people also refer to as “popcorning”. These behaviours are the sign of a contented rabbit with an adequate amount of space.

A bunny abode

While you can keep rabbits indoors, they are much happier outside. Rabbits can be kept outdoors year round as long as the proper precautions are taken. With these essentials and some care from you, your outdoor rabbits can enjoy living as close to nature as possible.

A secure rabbit hutch with attached run

All bunnies need a hutch to sleep, hide, and shelter in during inclement weather. The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch is designed to withstand any weather, and is twin-wall insulated to maintain a comfortable interior temperature. It’s also easy to clean, can be moved easily with the addition of optional wheels and handles, and is spacious enough for two rabbits to fit comfortably. 

The Eglu Go is designed with an attached run with full mesh flooring, which prevents escape attempts via tunneling and stops predators digging in. Our attached runs bolt onto the hutch itself, under the outer casing, and are made of heavy duty welded steel mesh, creating a fox proof environment. (Although, please ensure you check the clips over time to ensure all parts of the run are tightly closed together – over time, clips can weaken.) 

Alternatively, you can place your Eglu Go inside our Walk In Run. There is no need to shut your rabbits inside the hutch compartment at night, unless in extreme cold weather (and depending on which breed you have, and their tolerance for cold). This way, they can set their own schedule and stay active during the night and before dawn, letting them live according to their natural biorhythm.

Rabbit runs and playpens

Your rabbits’ run should be large enough for both of them to run and exercise comfortably. Additional rabbit runs and playpens can be added to your primary setup to provide even more space, connected by Zippi Rabbit Tunnels. This design closely mimics the burrowing system that wild rabbits use and brings your domesticated bunnies closer to their natural habitat. Zippi Rabbit Platforms can also be added to their playpens to utilize vertical space and offer a shady reprieve below.

Bunny bedding

The bedding of your bunnies’ hutch should be a non-toxic, absorbable material. Most rabbit owners find that pine shavings or pellets, or recycled paper bedding are the best materials to use. Avoid using hay or straw with rabbits, as these hold moisture and promote mould and mildew growth.

Your rabbits’ hutch should be cleaned at least every other day, preferably with daily bedding changes. Once a week the entire hutch should be wiped or sprayed down, and the bedding completely refreshed. This is especially important during the warmer summer months when your rabbits are at most risk of rabbit flystrike.

Rabbit in the Omlet Eglu Go with run hutch

Feeding your rabbits

Rabbits need a quality pellet feed and timothy hay – which should be their primary source of nutrition. Hay should be left out free-choice and filled as needed, while pellets should be fed as directed by the packaging – roughly an egg cup a day per rabbit is a good guide. Rabbits will eat – and poop – constantly, and need the fibre in the hay to stay regular. They can become seriously ill very quickly if they stop eating and pooping, so it’s important not to overfeed them with pellets, as this can result in them not eating the necessary amount of hay.   

Rabbit-safe fruits and vegetables can be offered as treats 2-3 times a week, but always in moderation. Leafy greens served in a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder, non-starchy vegetables, and berries are the best choices. Fresh, clean water should also be available at all times for your rabbits.

Handling your rabbits

Some rabbits take kindly to being cuddled, while others are more content to receive scratches from ground level. Either way, at some point it’s likely that you’ll need to handle your rabbit. The safest way to hold a rabbit is to angle their head so that it’s under your upper arm, with its nose pointed behind you. Tuck the rest of your rabbit’s body against your side, and secure them in a “football” hold with your lower arm and your hand wrapped around their hips. Always be mindful of your rabbit’s powerful back legs and sharp claws when handling them.

Veterinary care

There are no required annual vaccinations for rabbits in the US, and they rarely need deworming. But it’s still a good idea to have a veterinarian to contact if your bunnies ever feel ill or become injured. Not all veterinarians are equipped to treat rabbits, so be sure to select one that will treat your bunnies well before you bring them home. There are also elective vaccines for rabbits in some states to prevent contagious diseases – consult your veterinarian to discuss whether vaccinating your rabbits would be advisable.

Omlet and your rabbits

From easy to clean rabbit hutches and spacious rabbit runs, to ingenious and unique rabbit tunnel systems, we have everything you need to make your rabbit keeping journey both enjoyable and extraordinary. Create setups that are as unique as your rabbits, and build bonds with your bunnies that will last a lifetime. With Omlet, owning rabbits has never been more fun.

Rabbit eating fruit for the Omlet Caddi treat holder

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Keeping rabbits for beginners

Man and girl outside with rabbit using Omlet Rabbit Tunnel System

Keeping rabbits for beginners doesn’t have to be intimidating. In fact, these gentle animals are perfect for first-time pet owners due to their relatively easy care. With the right rabbit setup and research, you’ll be bonded with your bunny in no time. 

Which rabbit breed?

There are many breeds of rabbits available as pets. They vary widely in appearance, size, and temperament. Some require more maintenance than others, mostly because of their long coats and heat or cold tolerance. 

For example, Lion Heads have long coats in need of regular brushing to prevent mats from forming. They also aren’t as heat tolerant as other breeds due to their excess hair.  On the other hand, breeds like the Californian are very heat tolerant and have short haircoats that don’t require grooming. 

Rabbits may have erect or “lop” (long, floppy) ears. The anatomy of their ears doesn’t affect them much, except in the case of breeds like English Lops, as they are prized for their very long ears. These large, long-eared rabbits may be more prone to stepping on their ears in enclosures that are too small for them. 

The breeds considered to be best for beginner bunny keepers include: 

  • Mini Rex 
  • Holland Lop
  • Harlequin
  • Lion Head (so long as they are groomed regularly) 

The type and age of the rabbit you choose is largely a matter of personal preference. Most breeds have the same basic care needs, but be sure to research the breeds you’re considering thoroughly before making a final decision. 

You’ll also want to decide if you’d like to start with a young bunny or an adult. Rabbits of all ages need to be handled regularly in order to bond with their new owners, but young rabbits may forge this bond faster than adult bunnies that have had previous owners. Like other pets, bunnies have their own individual personalities that may not be apparent right away. Give your rabbit time to adjust to their new home, and you’ll soon see their personality shine through. 

How many rabbits should I get?

Rabbits are social animals that thrive off of bonds with each other. It’s always advised to keep at least two rabbits together to avoid a lonely bunny. In the wild, rabbits live in large groups called “colonies” and all live together in a network of tunnels and burrows called a “warren.” Colonies can consist of just two or three rabbits, or in the dozens. 

Domesticated rabbits share many of the same characteristics as their wild cousins, so the need for companionship runs deep. Decide how many rabbits you’d like to keep together, which will determine how much space they’ll need to be comfortable. To avoid accidental litters, only keep neutered males with females, or stick to females only. If you plan to keep more than one male, they should all be neutered to prevent territorial displays. 

Your new rabbits’ home

Omlet has created the perfect home for pet rabbits. The Eglu Go Plastic Rabbit Hutch is designed to meet all of your bunnies’ needs, as well as yours. Our easy-to-clean design keeps your rabbits fresh and clean and makes caring for your bunnies easier than ever. 

Our plastic rabbit hutches have revolutionized rabbit-keeping. Gone are the days of rotting, moldy, smelly wooden rabbit hutches. With an Eglu Rabbit Hutch, you’ll never have to worry about maintaining the ideal environment for your bunnies. 

Since rabbits need as much space as possible to keep fit and active, we’ve come up with several solutions that are conducive to any outdoor area. The attached run of the Eglu Rabbit Hutch can be extended up to 12 feet long, or your rabbit can explore new areas of your yard with an Outdoor Rabbit Run. Place your rabbit’s hutch inside of one of these rabbit runs, or connect the attached hutch run to the secondary run with our one-of-a-kind Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System. Designed to mimic tunnels and burrows in the wild, your rabbits will have their own backyard warren to keep them safe and happy all year round.

All of our rabbit products are predator-resistant, and feature optional anti-dig floor mesh to help prevent your bunnies from tunneling out. Optional handles and wheels can also be added to your rabbits’ hutch to move them around to fresh patches of grass, or shady areas of your yard. 

New rabbit checklist

All pet rabbits need the same basic care and supplies. To complete your new rabbit checklist, be sure to have: 

  • A quality rabbit hutch to keep them comfortable and secure 
  • High-quality feed, ideally pellets comprised mainly of timothy hay 
  • Free-choice timothy hay 
  • Fresh water available at all times 
  • Chew toys to trim their ever-growing teeth 
  • A good veterinarian that’s familiar with rabbits 

Bunnies thrive best when they’re given enrichment opportunities. Our outdoor rabbit runs combined with Zippi rabbit tunnels will help keep your rabbits’ minds and bodies active. Add weather protection to your rabbits’ run so that they can enjoy time out of their hutch – rain or shine. 

Rabbit owner watching rabbit on Omlet Zippi Platform in outdoor rabbit run

3 tips for beginning rabbit keepers 

Excited to get started on your rabbit-keeping journey? Below are the top tips to help ensure success from the start. 

Conduct rabbit research 

Before bringing your bunny home, you’ll want to research the breeds you’re interested in keeping, along with their enclosure and dietary needs. Some breeds require more space than others, while some breeds have different protein requirements in their diet. It’s always recommended to find your rabbits through a reputable breeder. Breeders are excellent resources for first-time bunny keepers and can help you with the specifics of the breed you’ve chosen. 

Establish a rabbit routine 

Your routine with your rabbits will be unique to you as an owner, but a realistic schedule should look something like this: 

Morning: 

  • Fill food bowl with pellets 
  • Refill hay feeder 
  • Refresh water bottle 

Afternoon:

  • Playtime 
  • Refill water if needed 

Evening: 

  • Clean hutch and refresh bedding 

If your rabbit has a long coat in need of grooming, you’ll need to make time to brush them a few times each week. Check your rabbits’ toenails monthly to see if they need a trim. Keep in mind that bunnies that have access to fresh earth will wear their nails down faster through play and digging than those kept in wire cages. If your bunny needs a nail trim, be sure you’re comfortable doing so on your own. Otherwise, your veterinarian can trim their nails for a modest fee.  

Bond with your bunny 

To have the best relationship with your rabbit, you’ll need to spend time with them each day. Once you get to know them, you’ll be able to understand your bunny’s body language. Handle your rabbits often to get them comfortable with you, and offer treats to reinforce desired behavior. Fresh fruits and vegetables are great rewards for training, as well as nutritious additions to your rabbit’s diet. Serve them in a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder to keep your rabbit occupied in your absence. 

Talk to your rabbits every time you interact with them to get them accustomed to your voice. Your bunny may be nervous the first few days in their new home, but with patience and care, you’ll earn their trust. Happy rabbits have clean, safe hutches, a well-balanced diet, and plenty of room to run around in. And, as any rabbit keeper will tell you, a happy rabbit is a joy to be around. 

Omlet and your rabbit-keeping journey

Omlet’s rabbit products have been designed to keep rabbits and their owners happy — no matter where they are on their journey together. From seasoned rabbit owners, to complete beginners, our rabbit hutches, Zippi tunnel system, and outdoor rabbit runs bring joy to bunnies and their humans alike. You can rest easy knowing that your rabbits are living their best lives in their Omlet setup, and enjoy being a rabbit keeper with our easy-to-clean, zero-maintenance rabbit products. 

Rabbit owner cleaning Omlet Go rabbit hutch

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Rabbit enrichment 101

Children playing with pet rabbits in the Omlet Zippi Tunnel System

Rabbits are very curious, energetic, and social animals that thrive off of enrichment. For rabbits, enrichment comes from activities that challenge their physical abilities and appeal to their intellectual side. Fostering your rabbits’ natural behaviors and offering their minds and bodies ways to become more strong and agile are among some of the most important aspects of caring for them. We’ve outlined what this means for bunnies, and how owners can provide this type of stimuli for their pets in our rabbit enrichment 101

Why is rabbit enrichment important?

In the wild, rabbits are constantly on high alert, looking for potential threats, future meals, and gauging weather conditions. These actions take a lot of energy – and as a result, their metabolisms are very fast. Domesticated rabbits however have caring owners that keep them protected from predators, provide their next meal, and keep them sheltered from the elements. But, these natural behaviors are still ingrained in your pet rabbits, and their resulting metabolisms and energy stores remain heightened. 

A happy rabbit is an active rabbit, and to foster these behaviors and expel pent-up energy, pet rabbits need enrichment. Bunnies that don’t have engaging activities, toys, or environments can become bored – which can spell trouble quickly. 

Types of rabbit enrichment 

There are many ways to provide enrichment for your rabbits. From simple changes to their environment to interacting with them frequently and with toys and treats, here are ways you can enhance your rabbits’ daily activities. 

Your rabbits’ enclosure

All rabbits should have a spacious rabbit hutch and run large enough for them to run and jump, and tall enough for them to stand up on their hind legs. This factor alone can cause bunnies to become bored if they’re unable to stretch their muscles the way nature intended. 

Additional space can be provided with Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens to give your rabbits plenty of room to express their natural behaviors. Link your bunnies’ hutch and run to their playpen with Zippi Rabbit Tunnels to provide them with a system that mimics burrows in the wild. Your rabbits will love the feel of tunneling, and you’ll love the damage-free way of letting them borrow and scurry in a way that makes them feel at one with nature.  

Rabbit platforms

Another way to add space and variety to their run is to use platforms with your rabbits

Zippi Rabbit Platforms bring your bunnies up to your level to interact with you and give them a new vantage point. The space beneath the platforms gives your rabbits extra room, and a shady shelter in the summer months. Create a hideout under the platform for chillier weather, or for rabbits that like a secluded space to unwind after a day of running their tunnels. 

Rabbit run accessories

Adding accessories to your rabbits’ run adds both visual appeal and excitement to their area. Play tunnels give your bunnies a place to burrow inside of their run. And, when linked with a Zippi Rabbit Shelter, your rabbits can have a modern model of bunny burrows in the wild. The solid structure mimics a warren that wild rabbits retreat to for rest and safety, and the connected tunnels enable your bunnies to feel safe when accessing their hideaway. 

Rabbit toys

Toys are another way to enrich your rabbits’ surroundings. It may take some trial and error to figure out which toys your rabbits prefer – some bunnies like auditory feedback during play that toys with bells provide, while others may enjoy quiet toys that they can carry around. 

Balls with or without bells (like those for cats), rabbit chew toys, snuffle mats, or puzzle toys are favorites among rabbits. DIY toys made from paper towel rolls or oatmeal containers are also entertaining and simple to make. 

If your rabbits aren’t interested in playing with individual toys, try making a digging box for them. Add shredded paper or sand to a container large enough for your rabbit to hop into. All bunnies love to dig, so those who aren’t as interested in playing with toys will enjoy a good rummage through their box. 

Treat holders

Elevating your rabbits’ snacktime gives them a fresh perspective along with a nutritional boost. Serving fresh greens and bunny-friendly fruits and veggies in a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder is stimulating for both their minds and bodies. Adjust the height of the Caddi to accommodate the size of your rabbits, or to encourage them to stretch their legs to reach their treats. By offering special treats this way, you’ll encourage them to use their natural instincts – just as wild rabbits would to reach berries or other rare finds. 

Affection

Rabbits also thrive on affection from their humans as a form of enrichment. Getting to know your bunnies’ love language will help you both bond through quality time and displays of affection. Some rabbits are cuddlers, while others prefer being petted or scratched while they take a luxurious stretch. Find what makes your rabbits most relaxed and meet them there. In return, you’ll notice your bunnies displaying behaviors and sounds to show their affection for you. 

Omlet and your rabbits

Our ingenious designs are crafted to bring you and your bunnies closer together. Not only are the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch and Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens the ideal home for your rabbits, but their low-maintenance design makes it easier than ever to enjoy taking care of your pets. And, when you add Zippi Rabbit Platforms to elevate your bunnies’ space, you’ll bring them to your level. Experience the enrichment that rabbits can offer their owners when you enrich their lives with Omlet. 

Boy and girl interacting with rabbits in the Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch

 

 

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Caring for your rabbits through a moult

Rabbit outside eating fruit from their Omlet Caddi rabbit treat holder

Did you know that rabbits moult twice a year? If you notice your bunny losing a lot of fur during the spring and autumn, it’s likely due to this seasonal shedding cycle. But caring for your rabbits through a moult doesn’t have to be difficult — we’ll share our top tips for keeping your bunny comfortable when the fur flies. 

Why do rabbits moult?

When you find fur all over your rabbits’ run, or notice them looking shaggy or unkept all of a sudden, you’re likely witnessing one of their moulting cycles. Rabbits will moult twice a year — once in the spring, and once in the autumn. This natural process is triggered by the amount of sunlight and the temperature of where your rabbit is kept. Your rabbit will moult: 

  • In the spring to shed their thick winter coat in preparation for warmer weather
  • In autumn to grow a thicker, heavier coat for winter
  • As babies to grow their adult coat 
  • As a result of stress or illness 

The entire moulting process takes between 2-6 weeks. Rabbits that complete their moult in 2 weeks will lose hair rapidly, leaving large amounts of fur behind. Those that take the full 6 weeks will shed their fur more slowly, so you won’t be as likely to notice the change. 

You may also notice your rabbits being slightly more irritable during the moulting process. They may also scratch, bite, lick, or rub at their coat in an effort to remove loose hair. Your rabbits may not want to be held during their moulting cycle, as their skin will be sensitive while growing a new coat. 

Care tips for your rabbits’ moult

There are a few things you can do to help your rabbits through their moulting cycles. By helping them shed as efficiently as possible, you’ll be able to get back to your favourite bunny-bonding activities. 

Housing and exercise 

As part of the essentials needed to care for rabbits, your bunnies’ home should be clean and accommodating. It helps to have an easy-to-clean rabbit hutch — especially during moulting seasons.  Excess hair in your rabbits’ hutch or run can attract insects and accumulate unwanted debris, so it’s important to remove it as often as possible. 

Rabbit owner cleaning the easy-to-clean Omlet Eglu Go rabbit hutch

Grooming 

Brushing your bunnies can help them shed their coat faster. The buildup of fur in the process of shedding can create painful mats or restrict your rabbits’ natural insulation methods. Using brushes designed to loosen undercoat fur will help prevent matting, and help keep them comfortable. Removing loose hair also helps prevent your rabbits from ingesting too much fur through self-grooming. 

If your bunny doesn’t enjoy being brushed, you can also gently pull the displaced tufts of fur from their undercoat. Only attempt to pull on tufts that are obviously extended beyond the length of their top coat — otherwise, you may risk pulling hairs that are still attached. 

Diet 

Your rabbits should always have access to fresh, clean water, timothy hay, and quality pellets — especially during moulting seasons. Growing a new hair coat takes a lot of energy, so be sure you’re giving your bunnies everything they need to fuel their bodies. Offer healthy treats like fresh leafy greens in a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder to give their immune systems a boost during their moult. 

Abnormal rabbit shedding 

Healthy outdoor rabbits will moult in spring and summer, with minimal shedding in between in order to maintain a healthy coat. Indoor rabbits that aren’t exposed to as much natural light or fluctuating temperatures may gradually shed their coats throughout the year, giving the impression that they shed year-round. 

If you notice your rabbits losing an excessive amount of fur outside of autumn or spring, or see inflamed patches of skin during a moult, you’ll need to contact your veterinarian. Rabbits can lose or pull their fur for other reasons, like: 

  • Illness or skin infections 
  • Stress
  • Pregnant females preparing a nest to have their litter 
  • Fighting 
  • Unsanitary living conditions 

Provide your rabbits with consistency throughout the year to keep their stress levels low. Avoid keeping intact males together to prevent aggressive behaviours, and keep intact males and females separated to prevent unwanted litters. Monitor new rabbits closely to see if cagemates become stressed, and try to avoid frequent changes to their diet. And, always keep your rabbits in a secure, comfortable home like the Eglu Go rabbit hutch to help them feel safe in their surroundings.  

Omlet and your rabbits’ moult

If you’re thinking of upgrading your rabbits’ run this autumn to help them through their seasonal moult, it’s never been a better time to transition them to the ingenuously designed Eglu Go rabbit hutch. Warm in the winter and cool in the summer, pair the Eglu Go rabbit hutch with other rabbit essentials for full fur-shedding support all year round. 

Girl looking at rabbit through the Omlet Eglu Go rabbit hutch

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Your rabbits’ perfect summer setup

Boy looking at his rabbits with their Omlet summer setup

Creating your rabbits’ perfect summer setup goes beyond just making sure they have cool water and frozen treats. Rabbits can actually enjoy being outdoors during the hottest months of the year when they have the right hutch and accessories. Find out how Omlet helps your rabbits not only weather the summer heat, but thrive in it. 

Rabbits and summer

Rabbits are amazingly resilient in most weather conditions. In the wild, rabbits don’t have the luxury of spending time in climate-controlled settings. But can their domesticated cousins thrive outdoors when temperatures rise? 

There are many things you can do to help your rabbits keep cool in the summer. Many owners try to mitigate the risk of heatstroke in their bunnies by providing frozen water bottles and other treats, but the reality is that these round-the-clock tasks aren’t always practical or sustainable. 

What rabbits really need is the right setup to thrive during the summer months. By having the right rabbit hutch, run, and accessories, you can greatly reduce the amount of time spent freezing bottles, brushing your bunnies, or worrying about flystrike in your rabbits

Eglu Go rabbit hutch

A great rabbit hutch is one that is well-ventilated, easy to clean, and can be moved if necessary. Conventional wooden rabbit hutches don’t fulfil these requirements, bringing stress to both rabbits and their owners. 

The Eglu Go rabbit hutch is the solution for every rabbit and owner. The twin-insulated walls keep the internal temperature of the hutch lower on even the warmest days, and the ample ventilation allows air to circulate freely without compromising heat barriers. And, with optional rabbit hutch wheels and handles, you can easily move your bunnies to shadier spaces throughout the day.  

Best of all, the easy-to-clean plastic of the Eglu Go ensures that keeping your rabbits’ home fresh is never a dreaded chore. In just a few minutes a day, your bunnies will have a comfortable, clean abode that won’t attract flies or other pests — unlike traditional wooden hutches.

Zippi rabbit run

Rabbits thrive in space – so giving them as much as possible is vital for their health and happiness. That’s why Omlet created Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens

Our pens make it easy for you to spend time with your rabbits inside of their run. With plenty of space to add dig boxes, play tunnels, or other rabbit run accessories, you and your rabbits will never feel the boredom that the dog days of summer bring. And, with the addition of rabbit run covers, you can instantly create shady spaces.  

Omlet outdoor rabbit run and Zippi Tunnel System in the sunset

Zippi Platforms

Building a pen to enjoy with your bunnies will build your bond as well. With our Zippi Rabbit Platforms, you can add both functionality and shade to your rabbits’ run. By giving them an elevated space, you’ll be able to interact with them on a whole new level, and your bunnies will be able to enjoy shade beneath the platforms.  

Use your rabbits’ Zippi Platforms for training, treating, or to best utilize their run space. No matter how you use Platforms with your rabbits, they’ll benefit from the added element and exercise opportunities. 

Zippi Tunnel System

In the wild, rabbits use burrows for many things – including keeping cool. To help foster this behaviour in domestic rabbits, we’ve developed the Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System. This fully customisable tunnel system can connect any rabbit hutch or run to other playpens or spaces. Each tunnel has cooling vents to allow airflow while your rabbits scurry along their routes – keeping them shaded and cool. 

The more tunnels you link together, the more space your rabbits have to expel energy or relax in the shade that the Zippi tunnels have to offer. Make your bunnies’ burrows as extensive or straightforward as you’d like, and watch them take to your backyard like they would a warren in the wild. 

Zippi Rabbit Shelter

For added solace from the sun, adding Zippi Rabbit Shelters to your rabbits’ run provides opportunities to escape the rays. These multipurpose hideouts are perfect for summer and winter, or to help easily stressed bunnies relax away from outside stimuli. And, with two entrances, multiple rabbits can easily share their space. 

Omlet and your rabbits

Rabbits can enjoy every season outside when they’re provided with everything they need to keep them comfortable and safe. At Omlet, we’ve designed our Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens, Zippi Rabbit Platforms, and Zippi Rabbit Shelters to not only provide enrichment, but to create a more natural environment for your bunnies to thrive in. Bring it all together with our Zippi Tunnel System, and your rabbits can enjoy their Eglu Go rabbit hutch outdoors all year round. 

Family outside by the swimming pool with rabbits in their Omlet Eglu Go rabbit hutch

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Rabbits and flystrike

Two children with rabbits using Omlet Zippi Tunnel System

Thankfully, rabbits and flystrike aren’t a common pairing when bunnies are well cared for. Healthy rabbits that can groom themselves and have a clean environment are not easily affected by flystrike. But as prey animals, rabbits are very good at masking their discomfort – so it’s important to know what flystrike is, how to prevent it, and how to treat it. 

What is flystrike?

Flystrike, also known as myiasis, is a condition where animals that live outdoors become infested with fly larvae (maggots). In rabbits, flystrike begins when Lucilia sericata (green bottle fly) lays eggs on their skin. When the maggots hatch, they take up residence on your rabbit – eating through the skin and eventually invading the deeper tissue beneath. As awful as this condition is, it’s not common in healthy bunnies. The majority of rabbits that suffer from flystrike are: 

  • Those that cannot groom themselves due to obesity or other illness
  • Living in unsanitary housing conditions 
  • Soiled from urine or faeces, or wounded 

If your rabbit’s coat becomes overly dirty (caked on droppings, urine-soaked, or constantly damp from the weather) or their living conditions become so soiled that droves of flies are drawn to them, they are at risk of flystrike. Flies are part of living outdoors and small numbers of these flying pests are not usually cause for alarm. But, when flies are attracted to the dirty, smelly coat of a rabbit in less-than-ideal conditions, trouble sets in. 

Flystrike is most common during the summer months when flies are the most active. Warmer temperatures are hospitable for maggots, and flies are in abundance this time of year. And, with more rabbits laying in the cool grass or shade during the heat of the day, flies can easily seek them out. Bringing your rabbit indoors during the hottest part of the day may help abate the nuisance from flies. 

Do indoor rabbits get flystrike?

Indoor rabbits can get flystrike, but it is much less common than if they lived outdoors. The same conditions apply for indoor rabbits to become affected by flystrike, and it’s less likely that those living indoors would have unsanitary coats or living conditions. And, houses tend to have fewer flies inside than the outside world. 

Keeping your home clean with indoor rabbits is essential to avoiding flies. If you’re bringing your outdoor rabbits inside for brief periods during the day, make sure you’re not bringing flies in with them. Clean their indoor spaces daily to deter flies from accumulating. 

6 signs & symptoms of flystrike in rabbits

Flystrike can occur rapidly, as maggots can hatch within mere hours of eggs being laid. Maggots seek out a food source as soon as they hatch, meaning your rabbit is in imminent danger of becoming a host for them. Bunnies may exhibit any of the following signs if they’re suffering from flystrike, so it’s important to perform regular rabbit health checks to evaluate their health. 

1. Presence of maggots 

The first symptom of flystrike is the presence of maggots. Fly larvae start out small and are worm-like in appearance. Flies lay their eggs on the part of the animal they are most drawn to. In the case of rabbits, this will usually be around the tail where urine and faeces are most likely to be present.

2. Lethargy 

Your rabbit may appear listless or dull when they’re in pain. Flystrike causes extreme discomfort, so your bunny is likely to be less active and will be hesitant to move in most cases. Lethargic rabbits may also spend more time inside of their hutch. 

3. Loss of appetite 

Most animals (rabbits included) will be off of their feed when they aren’t feeling well. If your rabbit isn’t eating or drinking, there’s a good chance there’s something going on with them. Flystrike can cause a weakened or dehydrated rabbit to go downhill rapidly. 

4. Increased digging 

Agitated rabbits in pain may dig more in an effort to relieve their discomfort. Look for signs of your rabbits digging in corners in particular. Claw marks on the inside of hutches, outside in the run, or in bedding can be telling of a rabbit in pain. 

5. Odour from enclosure 

As you can imagine, flystrike causes a foul odour. The smell of the decaying flesh that the maggots leave in their wake is not a subtle sign. This sign usually occurs as flystrike progresses to a dire level. 

6. Shock 

The final stage of flystrike is shock. Shock sets in when a rabbit’s body is overwhelmed by pain, infection, or external stressors. Flystrike brings all of these conditions, making it very dangerous for rabbits. Symptoms of shock include: 

  • Rapid breathing
  • Pale mucous membranes (eyes, gums) 
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness or collapse 
  • Death 

If you notice any maggots on your rabbit, or any of the above signs or symptoms, be sure to contact your bunny’s veterinarian right away. Prompt treatment is necessary to combat flystrike. 

Woman emptying bedding tray in Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch

Which rabbit breeds are more prone to flystrike?

Any breed of rabbit can fall victim to flystrike, but some may be more susceptible than others depending on environmental factors. Lionheads or Angora rabbits have longer coats than other breeds that can become soiled quickly without regular grooming. Large breeds like the Flemish Giant are more prone to obesity due to their size, and overweight rabbits can’t groom themselves as thoroughly as bunnies that are the ideal weight. 

How to prevent rabbit flystrike

Keeping your rabbit’s home clean is one of the most important and effective ways to prevent flystrike. Cleaning your rabbit’s hutch and refreshing their bedding daily in the summer is essential to combating flies. The Eglu Go Plastic Rabbit Hutch by Omlet can be thoroughly cleaned in just a few minutes each day, and has ample ventilation to prevent odours from building up. The expandable attached run gives rabbits plenty of room to run and lounge, spreading out their droppings to further deter flies from gathering. 

For even more space to escape flies, our Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System can be connected to your hutch and rabbit playpen to create a larger area. You can also add platforms to playpens to encourage more exercise and prevent your rabbits from becoming overweight. Combined with a balanced bunny diet, Zippi Rabbit Platforms will help your furry family members stay in tip-top shape. 

How to treat rabbit flystrike

Flystrike is a medical emergency and you should contact your rabbit’s veterinarian right away to prevent irreversible damage. Do not attempt to treat or remove burrowed maggots yourself, as pieces can break off inside of your rabbit and cause infection. Rabbits with flystrike will need prescription antibiotics and pain medication to make a full recovery. 

Omlet and caring for your rabbit

Omlet’s rabbit products help keep your rabbits healthy and happy. Our easy-to-clean designs were created to help owners spend less time cleaning and more time playing with their pets. The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch, Zippi Rabbit Platforms, and Zippi Tunnel System are all easy to keep clean, and encourage more movement from your bunnies to promote overall health. Combat flystrike and other dangerous conditions when you house your rabbit in expertly crafted setups by Omlet. 

Rabbit with their Omlet Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder with Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch behind them

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Are rabbits good pets for children?

Mother and child with pet rabbits using Omlet's Zippi Tunnel System with Omlet rabbit Platforms

With so many different species of animals to choose from, many parents find themselves asking: Are rabbits good pets for children? The short answer is yes, as long as there is mutual understanding between rabbits and their owners. Bunnies can be wonderful pets, full of personality and adorable antics when they’re able to exhibit their natural behaviours. With complete rabbit setups from Omlet, your children will begin bonding with their bunny right away, and for years to come. 

Why rabbits can make great pets for children

Rabbits are intelligent, sociable, and relatively low-maintenance. These attributes are some of the reasons why bunnies make great first pets for children. Rabbits can be housed indoors or outdoors, but are happiest when they are provided with as much space as possible. In the wild, rabbits live in extensive underground burrows and tunnels – and their domesticated counterparts share the same desire to navigate these structures. 

Omlet’s Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System simulates the tunnels and burrows that rabbits would construct in the wild. Combined with our Zippi Rabbit Runs and Platforms, your bunnies will be scurrying, bounding, and exploring just as they would naturally. And, you can let your children pick out rabbit run accessories to further customize their pets’ space. 

Our Eglu Go Rabbit Hutches are the perfect size bunny abodes for both pets and children. The easy-to-clean structure will enable your kids to clean their pet’s home with ease, and will keep your yard smelling fresh. And, with optional wheels and handles, our Eglu Go hutches and attached runs can be manoeuvred around the yard with ease. 

Creating a rabbit’s ideal space is just one of the many ways to bond with your bunny. Our rabbit products are designed to bring you and your bunny closer than ever. With the right setup and some quality time, your family will have forged a relationship with your rabbit that will last a lifetime. 

Rabbits and children: 3 things to consider

While it’s true that rabbits can make excellent first pets, it’s important to set realistic expectations for both your bunny and your children. Make sure your kids are prepared for the responsibilities associated with owning a rabbit, and are familiar with bunny behaviours and body language. 

1. Bunnies should have buddies

Rabbits do best in groups of two or more. In the wild, colonies of rabbits can consist of anywhere from two to dozens of bunnies. A lonely rabbit can act out or display attention-seeking behaviours. Adopting a pair of bonded rabbits is the best way to start off on the right foot, but you can also adopt young rabbits to raise together. Make sure that any males are neutered – even if you only keep males. Intact male rabbits can become territorial when kept together, and unaltered males kept with females will result in unwanted litters. Intact females can usually be kept together with no issues. 

2. Rabbits are a long-term commitment

The life expectancy of rabbits is 8-12 years, so they can be a long-term commitment. Make sure plans are in place for when your children and rabbits are older. Will they take their pets with them when they move out? Do you have younger children to care for the rabbits once their siblings are grown? Or, are you willing to continue caring for the rabbits yourself? 

The Eglu Go Plastic Rabbit Hutch is the only home you’ll need to buy for your rabbits. Designed to last a lifetime, our rugged construction of heavy-duty plastic and rot-free materials will stand the test of time. It should be noted that only rabbits over the age of 6 weeks old should be housed outdoors. Younger rabbits have more trouble regulating their body temperature, and will fare better when gradually introduced to outdoor temperatures. This also applies to older rabbits that were raised indoors. Introduce rabbits to life outdoors in small increments over the course of a couple of weeks to make the transition as smooth as possible. 

3. Bunnies need boundaries

Any rabbit can be housed outdoors, and most fare better when they’re allowed to live outside. Not only does it mimic their natural habitat, but being outside gives them reprieve from the hustle and bustle of a household. Understanding your bunny’s body language will clue you in on how they’re doing in their surroundings. And, as with most pets, giving your rabbits as much space as possible will help ensure they’re healthy and happy as possible. 

Omlet’s Zippi Rabbit Playpens help create boundaries for your bunnies in any setting. Perfect for designated spaces outdoors, or as indoor playpens for a change of scenery, our Zippi Playpens are easy to move and are predator-resistant for peace of mind. 

The attached run of the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch can also be extended to up to 12 feet long, giving your rabbits plenty of room to roam. 

Two children outside with their Rabbit in Omlet outdoor rabbit run

Best rabbit breeds for children

Once you’ve decided that rabbits will be a good fit for your family, it’s time to decide on the breeds of bunnies you’ll want to keep. Choosing the right rabbits largely comes down to personal preference and your space or climate. 

For example, breeds like the Lionhead rabbit are excellent for children due to their docile nature, but may not be suited to life outdoors in hot or humid weather. Californians are considered to be a hardy breed in all climates, as well as being known for their sweet temperaments. Other breeds that are good for children include: 

Flemish Giants also make excellent pets, but due to their size require plenty of space. 

Omlet and your pet rabbit

Omlet aims for owners to raise their rabbit-readiness status quickly and easily. Our line of bunny products like the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch, Zippi Rabbit Playpens and Platforms, and Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System are all designed to make rabbit ownership truly remarkable. At the end of the day, parents have to ensure that their children are caring for their pets properly, but with Omlet, helping your children with chores becomes a joy. With Omlet, you’ll bring your entire family closer together – both with each other and with your pets. 

Mother and child with rabbit using Omlet Zippi Tunnel System

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Rabbit care essentials 

Rabbit with their Omlet Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder with Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch behind them

Rabbits make excellent pets for owners of all ages. Once you have all of the rabbit care essentials you need, bunnies are easy to take care of. They can be litterbox trained similarly to cats, are capable of bonding with their owners, and are a joy to watch. Like all pets, bunnies need love, attention, and proper housing to live a healthy and happy life. 

Omlet has designed products that meet your rabbit’s needs, while making caring for them as easy as possible for you. Our line of rabbit products set you up for success with your bunny from the very beginning, and for the years to come. Let’s explore what life with rabbit products by Omlet looks like. 

The perfect rabbit hutch

Does the perfect rabbit hutch exist? We think so! The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch checks all the boxes for both bunnies and their keepers. Here are some reasons why: 

  • The dual-insulated walls of the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch keep your bunny cool in the summer and warm in the winter 
  • All plastic construction and a removable bedding tray make cleaning a breeze 
  • An easy-access rear panel and pivoting hutch door keeps your rabbit accessible 
  • The attached run has anti-dig flooring and can be expanded for even more space 

Plastic vs wooden rabbit hutches

Your rabbit’s hutch is where they will spend the majority of their time, so it’s important to choose the right one. There are a lot of rabbit hutch options out there, but a quality rabbit hutch should be safe, well-constructed, and built to last for years. 

Plastic rabbit hutches are far superior to traditional wooden hutches. Most notably, rabbits have a natural desire to chew in order to keep their ever-growing teeth trimmed short. But, this spells trouble for wooden hutches, as they quickly become a chew toy for your bunny. Over time, chewing weakens the structural integrity of wooden hutches, which makes your rabbit vulnerable to unwanted visits from predators.

Omlet’s Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch will never succumb to rot like wooden hutches, and will never need touch-up paint or re-roofing. Plastic is not appetizing to rabbits, so you won’t have to worry about your bunny gnawing on their house. And unlike wooden hutch wire, our heavy-duty wire panels that make up the attached run are complete with mesh flooring to prevent your bunny from burrowing out of their enclosure. 

Accessorize your rabbit’s home

Rabbits are extremely active animals. From wild hares to pet bunnies, rabbits need exercise and enrichment to stay physically and mentally fit. They need plenty of space to run, hop, and scurry, so you’ll need to give them as much room as possible. 

Our Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System can extend your rabbit’s domain while fostering their natural burrowing behaviour. Zippi Tunnels can be attached to any type of wooden hutch or wire run, and have multiple customization options. Expand and change your rabbit’s Zippi Tunnel System at any time with connection pieces, additional tunnels, and accessories. 

Add vertical space with Zippi Rabbit Platforms inside their run for maximum space-enhancing fun. Using platforms with your rabbits allows for training and exercise opportunities, as well as shady areas below for rest after a long day of play. Platforms are great places to keep your rabbit’s food and water, as they are accessible and easy to clean.  

What about indoor rabbits?

If you choose to house your rabbit indoors, it’s still a good idea to have a safe space for them outside to stretch their legs. Bunnies love to nibble on fresh grass and other rabbit-safe vegetation. You can even add rabbit-friendly plants to your garden to make your bunny’s outdoor space even more enjoyable. 

Our Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens are excellent options for rabbits to spend some time outside. Floor panels keep your bunny from burrowing out, while still allowing plenty of grass through to be nibbled on. And, Zippi Runs and Playpens are easy to move around your garden to give your rabbit new areas to explore. 

Make sure your home is rabbit-proof if you keep your bunny indoors. Even if your rabbit isn’t left to its own devices indoors, if an accidental hutch escape occurs you don’t want them getting themselves into trouble. Common household hazards to rabbits include: 

  • Low-hanging power cords 
  • House plants, many of which can be toxic to rabbits 
  • Silk or artificial plants (if they look real, your rabbit is likely to try a nibble)
  • Other pets such as dogs or cats 
  • Doors that lead outside 

Rabbits are very adaptable to life outdoors, so unless your area experiences extreme heat or extreme cold, housing your rabbit outside in an Eglu Go Hutch and Run is a great alternative to keeping them inside. For extremely hot days, you may want to have a temporary indoor enclosure to bring your bunny inside during peak temperatures. In sub-freezing temperatures, supplemental Extreme Temperature Jackets for the Eglu Go Hutch can be used for an additional layer of insulation. 

A good quality diet

Now that your rabbit has the perfect home, it’s time to select their feed. There are so many commercially available rabbit feeds that it can be overwhelming to choose which is best for your bunny. Knowing what breed of rabbit you have and how old they are will help you determine which food is best for them. For example, younger rabbits need more protein in their diet than adults. 

All rabbits need quality pellets that are made primarily from timothy hay. Rabbit feed that has treats or other elements added in may look appetizing, but they don’t provide a balanced diet for your bunny. Rabbits also need free-choice timothy hay to keep their teeth short and to promote healthy digestion. 

Food and water bowls

You’ll also need appropriate food and water containers for your rabbit. Metal feed bowls are best, as they are easily cleaned and can’t be chewed on or broken. No-tip bowls are a great choice, having a wide base and being harder to turn over. Some rabbits will hop into their food bowls while they eat, or accidentally knock into them during play, so having a bowl that won’t tip over is important. 

Water bottles are one option for your rabbit to drink from. Most rabbits do fine with this type of drinker, but during the hot summer months, water bottles may not dispense water fast enough for a parched rabbit. Water crocks can be hung on the sides of your rabbit’s run to prevent spilling, and have an open top for your rabbit to drink their fill. You can also place a no-tip water dish inside their run, but keep in mind they will likely kick grass or other debris into a ground-level bowl. 

Rabbit toys

Finally, offer some toys to your rabbit to keep them occupied and engaged in their setup. Toys are great for busting boredom and to encourage natural behaviours. Try offering small balls made from timothy hay, applewood chew toys, or a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder from Omlet. 

Hang the Caddi Treat Holder from the top of any run or enclosure to elevate snack time. Fresh fruits, vegetables or hay are perfect for the Caddi to serve up to your bunny. Watch as they stretch and use their critical thinking skills to nibble their way through their Caddi offerings. 

Omlet and rabbit care

We’ve invented the products you need to grow your relationship with your rabbit. Our line of rabbit hutches, rabbit runs, rabbit tunnels, and toys for rabbits are all designed to help your rabbit live life to the fullest and to make taking care of them easy and fun for you. Create the ultimate bunny abode when you choose Omlet for your rabbit’s needs. 

Rabbits in Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch with Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System

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Christmas treats for rabbits and guinea pigs 

Guinea pigs in Christmas hats eating Christmas treats

Christmas is the most magical part of the season. It’s the perfect time to snuggle up with your small furry friend and enjoy this special time of year.

And let’s not forget the food. Christmas is one of the biggest holidays for a “foodie,” and if you share a home with a rabbit or guinea pig, you know they’re foodies too. Thankfully, there are several festive treats that you can share with your food-loving friends – just hold the seasoning and spices. 

What are your Christmas meal staples? If you’re like most, your Christmas spread probably includes turkey, stuffing, various vegetables, and sides, punctuated with decadent desserts. And with all that meal prep, there are lots of scraps and trimmings that you can give your rabbit or guinea pig as a special holiday treat. 

Treats for your bunnies  

Rabbits and carrots go together like turkey and gravy. But what other trimmings can you save for your bunny when you’re prepping for your Christmas meal? 

Rabbit-safe Christmas meal ingredients that you can share with your bunny include: carrots and their tops (though in moderation, as carrots are high in sugar – which is why rabbits love them), celery, cranberries (fresh or unsweetened and dried), fresh green beans, and leafy greens such as lettuce and cabbage. And if your Christmas dinner doesn’t stick to the traditional menu, a list of rabbit-safe foods can be referenced to see what you can feed your bunny from the kitchen. 

The easiest way to keep your rabbit’s treats separate from what gets tossed and what gets seasoned is to keep a bunny bowl on the counter. Any trimmings that are meant for your rabbit can be scooped into a bowl and offered once you’re done with your meal prepping – just make sure all of your helping hands in the kitchen know what this is for.  

If you’re really feeling festive, you can also find many recipes online for rabbit-friendly baked goods like carrot cake or banana treats to make their holiday extra special. 

Guinea pig goodies 

Guinea pigs follow a diet that resembles a rabbit’s, except that they need more vitamin C as they cannot manufacture their own. The same foods that you reserve for your rabbit can be safely offered to your guinea pig, but some additional considerations for cavies are: small amounts of orange or orange peel, bell peppers (yellow, red, or orange are best), broccoli, apple slices, and berries. 

Part of the cuteness of cavies is their build, but with their little legs and larger bodies, it’s important not to overfeed them. Ideas for guinea pig baked goods can also be found online, but any holiday goodies should be served as a one-time treat. 

Keep a cavy cup handy in the kitchen during holiday baking and meal prep. If possible, refrigerate excess scraps to offer at a later date if your cup “runneth over!” 

Holiday hazards 

While there are many delicious and nutritious foods to share with your rabbit or guinea pig, there are also holiday staples that should not be shared. Avoid feeding: 

  • Nuts and seeds
  • Potatoes (especially if raw) 
  • Sugary or baked goods 
  • Bread 
  • Meat 

If your rabbit or guinea pig happens to sneak a taste of something they shouldn’t, identify what it was and how much they ingested and call your vet. Christmas is the most common time of the year for pets (large and small) to get into something they shouldn’t, so take precautions to ensure your bunny or cavy aren’t able to sneak a bite. Make sure your rabbit or guinea pig is safe in their hutch or run, or set up a rabbit or guinea pig playpen to keep your furry family members out of the kitchen and away from falling foods and cooking utensils.  

White rabbits eating from a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder on Zippi Rabbit Run Platforms

Special occasion treats and year-round feeding 

Rabbits and guinea pigs both need a quality pellet feed (ideally timothy hay-based), and unlimited access to timothy hay or orchard grass and fresh water, with guinea pigs needing additional vitamin C. Around 90% of both your rabbit and guinea pig’s diet should consist of these staples, with treats being given no more than a few times a week. 

The best treats are those that incorporate into a well-balanced diet for bunnies and cavies, such as vegetables or fruits that offer nutritional value. Anything indulgent should be offered on special occasions like holidays or your pet’s birthday – otherwise, it might upset their digestive systems or influence their food preferences. 

Feeding treats in a Caddi rabbit treat holder or a Caddi guinea pig treat holder is a great way to keep their favourite treats together and up off the ground. It’s also a nice “plating” option when serving up special holiday fare. 

A home for the holidays 

The holiday season should be a time of comfort and joy for both you and your furry family members. This time of the year also brings colder temperatures and freezing precipitation, so be sure your rabbit or guinea pig is housed in an insulated rabbit hutch or guinea pig hutch for optimum cosiness. And bring on the joy with Zippi tunnels and playpens for endless fun so guinea pigs and rabbits can warm up their bodies and appetites. 

With a warm home, full bellies, and loving humans, your small furry family members are sure to have the best holiday season. 

Guinea pigs in front of Omlet Guinea Pig Caddi Treat Holder

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Why Do Rabbits Have Whiskers? 

Black and white rabbit using Omlet Zippi Rabbit Play Tunnel

What do you think of when you hear the word whisker? You may envision a 5 o’clock shadow on the face of a man, or maybe even a kitchen gadget. But chances are that the first thing that comes to mind is the face of an adorable animal such as a kitten or a rabbit. 

We all know that rabbits have whiskers – as children, we learn to draw them onto the faces of our bunny artwork, and that they’re an essential part of any good rabbit costume. But do whiskers serve a practical purpose beyond just adding cute-factor to the muzzles they grace? 

Virtually every mammal has whiskers! Whiskers have much more sensitive follicle bases than regular hairs, so while nerves do not run through the whisker itself, they are able to relay sensory input through touch. These naturally-acquired facial accessories serve the same two main functions in all species: 

  1. To sense surroundings in dark conditions 
  2. To serve as a measuring aid when assessing small spaces 

So as a pet, does your rabbit still need these capabilities? And as an owner, is there any special care to be taken with these sensitive appendages? 

The wonder of whiskers 

Your pet rabbit uses their whiskers on a daily basis. In fact, they provide a virtual sixth-sense for your bunny! Rabbits don’t have the same focus or depth-perception to their vision that humans do, so their whiskers provide them with tactile sensory feedback to fill in the missing details. Even when they’re in a familiar space such as their rabbit hutch or rabbit playpen, rabbits utilize their facial “feelers” when it’s too dark to see their surroundings. 

Before just bounding into any ol’ burrow, your rabbit uses its whiskers to determine whether or not they’ll fit into a tight space. Even as your rabbit runs through their Zippi Rabbit Tunnels, they’re being felt out by a rabbit’s whiskers to make sure they’ll fit! 

And, new studies suggest that like other animals, rabbits are able to tell the texture of an object by vibrating their whiskers against it! Rabbits can also sense vibrations and the movement of air and water with their whiskers. 

Rabbits are able to twitch and move their whiskers in an action called “whisking.” While this type of whisking may not produce baked goods, it does bring joy to the observer! Whiskers are also the first points of contact when meeting another rabbit or fellow animal with whiskers – almost like a handshake! 

Whisker length and arrangement 

A rabbit’s longest whiskers are as long as their bodies are wide on each side! They’re also arranged according to a specific pattern above their eyes, on their nose, and under their chins for a full range of spatial awareness. The whiskers start off shorter by their nose, and get longer in each row going toward their cheeks and tops of their heads. 

The whiskers toward the front of their face act as tactile tools for feeling around in the dark, or for sensing objects directly in front of them. Due to the placement of their eyes, rabbits cannot see something that’s directly in front of their nose – they rely on their other senses to perceive what is right in front of them. 

The longer whiskers above their eyes look very similar to false eyelashes! Not only does this give them a doe-eyed expression, these longer lashes also keep debris from getting into a rabbit’s eyes. 

A rabbit’s longest whiskers are used primarily for gauging spaces, orienting themselves, and feeling for vibrations. 

Does my rabbit need a shave? 

It’s very important to never cut your rabbit’s whiskers! Since the whisker itself does not have blood or nerve supply, cutting it will not cause pain, but it will interfere with a rabbit’s natural abilities and coordination. Think of it as if you were taking eyeglasses or contact lenses away from someone who is severely near-sighted. They would be able to walk, certainly, but they would stumble, bump into things, second-guess themselves and not move nearly as quickly or efficiently as they did before. If a rabbit were to suddenly lose its whiskers, it would have to re-learn how to interact with its surroundings. 

If you were to trim rather than shave the whiskers off at the base, it would relay incorrect information to the rabbit. By trimming the whiskers shorter, they would no longer be as long as the rabbit is wide. Your rabbit may then try to squeeze into spaces they have no business trying to fit into! 

Whisker worries 

Why are my rabbit’s whiskers falling out? 

Just as they do with their coats, rabbits will shed their whiskers in a routine fashion. So, if you find a stray whisker in your rabbit’s environment every once in a while – don’t be alarmed! It’s a perfectly normal process, and soon a new whisker will grow in its place. 

Will your rabbit be alright without a whisker? Don’t fret – if your rabbit is down a whisker or two, they likely won’t notice the difference! 

What if my rabbit’s whisker is bent? 

A bent whisker will either eventually fall off at the break, or fall out as part of the natural shedding process and will regrow as usual. Refrain from trimming the broken part of the whisker yourself because you could accidentally cut or more whiskers in the process! 

Why is my rabbit bleeding from the base of a whisker? 

If a whisker is pulled or twisted during rough play, it may either fall out completely, or be partially detached at the base. Whiskers are as sensitive as they are because the roots are in a hair follicle with a blood supply. A small amount of blood is normal for the sudden, unexpected removal or loss of a whisker, but if your bunny is bleeding actively, call your veterinarian! Other reasons for concern over a whisker that warrant a call to the veterinarian include:

  • Inflamed base of a whisker, with or without swelling 
  • Oozing blood or yellow fluid from the base of a whisker
  • A partially detached whisker that has not fallen out on its own after a couple of days 
  • Whisker loss beyond normal shedding – this could be losing multiple whiskers all at once, or whiskers not growing back 
  • Whiskers above the eye that turn inward, causing them to rub against your rabbit’s cornea

Create spatial awareness 

Even with the use of super-appendages, rabbits need a space designed to foster and encourage their natural behaviors. Rabbits are very sensitive animals, and their whisker-wielding ways only adds to the amount of stimuli they process. 

By providing the optimal environment, you’ll create a space for your rabbits to feel safe when they perceive danger, playful when they feel safe, and relaxed when they feel secure. Our line of rabbit products do exactly that, taking the guesswork out of creating the ideal habitat for your rabbit! 

Our products have been thoroughly “whisked” over by hundreds (maybe even thousands!) of rabbits from around the world. And all of the whiskers agree – Omlet has the hutches, play tunnels, shelters, and accessories to keep your rabbit’s sixth sense performing its best.  

Close up of rabbit whiskers

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Keeping Your Home Clean with Indoor Rabbits

Rabbit peeking into Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch

Are you considering adding a rabbit to your family? Or thinking about bringing an outdoor bunny indoor for a season, or even permanently? 

Like other small pets, rabbits are very interesting companions to share a home with. They’re easy to care for, build bonds with their families, and don’t require a large amount of space. But unlike other small pets, rabbits are highly adaptable when it comes to their lodging. They can be housed indoors or outdoors, and adapt quickly to a wide variety of environments. 

Keeping rabbits indoors allows for closer interaction with them, and also eliminates certain risk factors that come along with outdoor living – such as predators and harsh weather. By keeping your rabbit inside, you’ll also be able to observe their personality and behaviours much more closely. By sharing your living space with your bunny, you won’t have to miss out on a single binky, flop, sprawl, or purr from your furry-family member! 

As with any pet, you’ll need to maintain your bunny’s abode to keep it smelling and looking fresh. But with proper placement and cleaning measures, having a pet rabbit indoors can be an aesthetically pleasing and enriching addition to your home! 

Boundaries for your bunny 

Like small children, bunnies are very curious and don’t always know what’s friend or foe before testing it! It’s very important to take the following rabbit-proofing measures before allowing your bun to explore the inside of your home: 

  • Make sure your rabbit does not have access to electrical wires such as electronic cables, lamp cords, etc. 
  • Close off any small spaces that your bunny may try to squeeze into. 
  • Let everyone in your home know when your rabbit has run of the house to make sure no outside doors get left open. 
  • Consider blocking off access to wooden furniture that may be enticing to chew on, as treated wood is harmful to rabbits. 

For a more exhaustive list of indoor rabbit-proofing, visit: How to Rabbit-Proof Your House

While you should aim to give your rabbit as much room to stretch their legs outside of their hutch as possible, it’s a good idea to limit your rabbit to specific areas of your home to explore, such as one room or in a rabbit playpen. You’ll be able to keep up with your bunny much easier than if they had free-rein of your house, and having boundaries will make them feel safe and secure. 

Litter boxes are not just for cats 

Did you know that you can litter box train your rabbit? Like cats, rabbits can be taught to utilize a litter box when nature calls! 

Rabbits don’t have quite the instinctive drive to use a litter box as their feline friends, but with a little practice and patience they’ll get the hang of it. 

Basic litter box training for rabbits: 

  • Placement is key! Find where your bunny likes to relieve themselves (usually a corner or other secluded spot) and place their litter box in the exact same location. 
  • Use some of your rabbit’s eliminations to “bait” the litter box. Pick up some of your bunny’s droppings and empty them on top of the litter. You can also mop up some urine with an unscented tissue or paper towel to place in the litter box. 
  • Choose a litter box or pan that is an appropriate size for your bunny. If your rabbit uses a corner as their toilet, consider buying a corner-mounted litter box. 
  • Use a rabbit-appropriate litter (not cat litter!) for your bunny’s litter box. 
  • Keep your bunny’s litter box in close proximity for the first few weeks. After they get the hang of using it, you can move it to a specific room or keep it in their hutch for them to scurry off to when nature calls! 

Be patient when training your rabbit to use a litter box, and expect accidents to happen! For more information on litter box training your rabbit, check out: How to Litter Train Your Rabbit

When and how often to clean your rabbit’s home 

Even if your rabbit is litter box trained, their enclosure will need to be cleaned regularly. Many factors determine how often your bunny’s home needs to be refreshed. Male or female, spayed or neutered, and the size of their enclosure all play a part in how often bedding and hutches will need to be cleaned. 

A male rabbit that has not been neutered will have a natural “musky” smell, both from his scent glands and in his urine. Intact male rabbits are also more likely to spray to mark their territory, making eliminations outside of their litter box a regular occurrence (high-sided or enclosed litter boxes are ideal for male rabbits!). Intact females are also known to mark with urine more so than spayed females. However, thanks to their anatomical differences from males, they aren’t quite as messy with their marking! 

Use an unscented bedding for your rabbit’s enclosure and litter. While it may sound nice to have a scented bunny enclosure, many added perfumes or scents can be irritating to a rabbit’s sensitive sniffer! Stick with natural odour-absorbing beddings such as recycled paper, pine shavings or pellets, or aspen shavings. Avoid using any bedding that is made from cedar, as the oils can be toxic to your bunny. Straw makes for interesting bedding, but will mould easily once it’s wet, resulting in more frequent changes. 

Plastic rabbit hutches are much easier to keep clean than their wooden counterparts, as they do not absorb odours. They’ll also last longer since rabbits nibble on wood to trim their ever-growing teeth! Hutches such as the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch offer ample ventilation to help air out any stale odours and allow for faster drying times after cleaning. 

Rabbit-friendly cleaners 

There are many commercially available rabbit-friendly cleaners and sprays that can be used safely around your bunny – just be sure to check the labels for use around rabbits specifically. Sprays formulated with enzymes are great for a quick refresh in the room your rabbit is housed in or in between cleanings – particularly if you have a male rabbit! Simply spray on your bunny’s bedding, litter, or hutch to neutralize odours for up to 24 hours. Again, just be sure to adhere to the manufacturer’s instructions on the bottle! 

A quick and easy DIY cleaning solution can be made by mixing equal parts vinegar and warm water for your rabbit’s hutch and accessories. Vinegar is one of the safest and effective cleaning agents for use around bunnies, but if you don’t like the smell of vinegar, this mixture can be diluted even further – up to 1 part vinegar to 10 parts water while still maintaining its cleaning ability. Refrain from adding any “smelly” agents such as essential oils, scent boosters, or other extras to your homemade cleaning solution. 

Cleaners to avoid around your bunny 

A common additive to cat litter boxes for odour-elimination is baking soda, but it is one of the substances that is toxic to bunnies in large amounts. 

Other harmful cleaners or odour-eliminating substances that are hazardous to rabbits include: 

  • Aerosols, or air fresheners 
  • Chlorine bleach or ammonia 
  • Detergents or dishwashing liquid 
  • Powdered cleaning chemicals 
  • Floor cleaners, both for hard flooring and carpets 
  • Wood furniture cleaners and conditioners 

It’s important to keep any areas your rabbit may explore free of these substances, including any rooms of your home that they will have access to. Bunnies may try to dig or nibble on carpets, baseboards, or furniture legs, so be sure to either keep them away from these objects, or to only clean your home with rabbit-safe options. 

As always, if you suspect your rabbit has ingested or come into contact with a harmful substance, contact your veterinarian right away. 

Your rabbit and us 

At Omlet, we strive to help you reduce time cleaning and maintaining your rabbit’s area so there’s more time for play! With our extensive line of rabbit products, you’ll find everything you need to make indoor-rabbit ownership easy and enjoyable. Zippi rabbit runs, playpens, and tunnels allow you to customize the ultimate indoor rabbit playground, with plenty of space for them to “binky”, zoom, sprawl, and hop to their heart’s content! Our products are fully customizable to your space and preferences, and can be modified as often as you’d like to keep your rabbit’s space engaging and enriching. 

Whether you’re bringing your rabbit indoors for the season, or making a more permanent housing change, we’re here to help! Have questions about transitioning your outdoor rabbit indoors or about products that will help your rabbit adjust to life indoors? Message us below! 

Bringing your rabbit indoors - house rabbit on bed

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Plant a Garden, Feed a Rabbit

Girl outside in garden with rabbits using Omlet Zippi Rabbit Run Platform

The story of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter paints a fairly bleak picture of a rabbit’s life in a garden. In fact, rabbits earn a bad reputation around the world as garden menaces. Their fast metabolism and curious natures drive rabbits to seek the tastiest and most nutritious vegetation, which inevitably lands them in a predicament much like Peter found himself in! But with a little planning and mindful designing, your garden can be free of the strife that Mr. McGregor experienced! 

Our domesticated rabbits have the same instincts as their wild counterparts. In the wild, rabbits live in almost every climate imaginable, and can be found on every continent except Antarctica! This means they have to be able to eat a wide variety of plants to sustain themselves. Wild rabbits are also expert excavators, capable of digging extensive networks of tunnels and burrows. Unfortunately, both of these behaviours can spell bad news for a gardener. 

But what if our pet rabbits could live in harmony with our garden plants, just as wild rabbits cohabitate with their native vegetation? What if digging and burrowing could work to the gardener’s advantage while encouraging our pet bunnies to foster their natural instincts? 

A rabbit-ready garden 

Rabbits are seriously misunderstood as gardening-assistants! If the proper care is taken when designing a garden, pet rabbits can actually be very helpful when tending plants. They’ll trim the ends and edges of plants they are allowed access to, turn the soil through digging and burrowing, and mow stray patches of grass and invasive weeds. As an added bonus, those round bunny poops are actually little nuggets of garden gold! Rabbit manure is one of the best fertilizers for gardens, with many rabbit-keepers saving a stash to add to their compost and natural fertilizers. 

But what plants are rabbit-safe? And how much is too much? 

Here is a list (which is by no means exhaustive!) of gardening favourites that are both delicious and nutritious for your outdoor bunny: 

Garden “Staples”: 

  • Arugula
  • Bell Pepper
  • Broccoli (leaves and stems are best)
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Carrots and Carrot Tops 
  • Celery 
  • Fresh Grass (not clippings!)
  • Greens (mustard, turnip, etc.)
  • Herbs (basil, cilantro, dill, mint, parsley, rosemary, etc.)
  • Lettuce (the darker the variety, the more nutritious!)
  • Okra
  • Radishes and their leaves
  • Squash (summer, zucchini, etc.)

 Flowers: 

  • Asters
  • Carnations
  • Geraniums
  • Hibiscus
  • Marigolds
  • Nasturtium
  • Pansies
  • Roses
  • Sunflowers

Fruits: 

  • Apples*
  • Apricots*
  • Bananas (peel removed)
  • Cherries*
  • Kiwi
  • Mangoes*
  • Melons
  • Nectarines*
  • Papaya
  • Peaches*
  • Pineapple
  • Plums*
  • Star Fruit
  • Strawberries

* Safe when stems and seeds are removed, as high amounts can be toxic! 

Additional ideas for naturally-found rabbit treats can be found here: Forage Treats For Your Rabbit

As with most tasty things, too much of a good thing can be, well, too much! In order to keep your bunny from overeating (both for their sake and that of the plant!), you’ll need to wrap or surround your plants and shrubs in rabbit-proof mesh to restrict nibbling, or elevate your plants by using planters, plant stands, or raised flower beds. Multi-level gardening can be visually stunning, and your back will thank you when tending to vegetation in raised plant beds! 

It’s important to remember that hay (such as timothy or orchard grass) should make up the majority of your pet rabbit’s diet – 75% to be exact! The other 25% of foods offered should be allocated for veggies, pellets, and small amounts of fruit. 

Woman outside gardening with rabbits in their Omlet Outdoor Rabbit Run

Rabbit red-flags: plants to avoid

Not everything that grows in a garden is safe for your rabbit to consume, and they won’t know the difference between friend and foe when it comes to snacks. Anything plant-like looks appetizing to a rabbit! Take extra care not to plant any of the following where your bunny can accidentally sneak a nibble: 

  • Azalea
  • Blue Bell
  • Brugmansia (Angel Trumpet)
  • Buttercup
  • Christmas Rose
  • Columbine
  • Daffodil
  • Dahlia
  • Foxglove
  • Hemlock
  • Hyacinth
  • Iris
  • Ivy
  • Lupine
  • Lily of the Valley
  • Milkweed
  • Mistletoe
  • Narcissus
  • Nightshade
  • Periwinkle
  • Poppy
  • Primrose
  • Rhododendron
  • Tulip
  • Wisteria
  • Yew

If you are concerned that your rabbit may have gotten a taste of a toxic plant, or is acting ill after consuming any vegetation, be sure to contact your veterinarian right away. It is also helpful to bring a sample of the plant that was ingested, or a picture of the plant in question for your veterinarian to identify. 

Rabbit-friendly fertilizers and weed killer

Since rabbits like to dig and burrow in the ground, caution needs to be taken when conditioning your garden’s soil. Commercially bought fertilizers and weed killers contain many substances that are harmful to bunnies, and should be avoided. 

Thankfully there are many alternatives to name-brand garden products – and you probably already have the ingredients in your pantry to make them yourself! 

The best fertilizer for your garden is made through composting. Compost is super-food for plants, with the added bonus of being super-easy to start and maintain. Made from organic waste such as: food scraps, coffee grounds, dead leaves, grass clippings, weeds, etc., you can start composting as soon as your next meal! Compost piles can be made in a secluded part of your garden, or you can invest in a composting bin. No matter which method you choose, after a small amount of effort you’ll have an easy and nutritious boost for your plants that won’t harm your rabbits! 

You can also add individual composting ingredients directly to the soil without waiting for them to break down. Some of the most common soil additives include coffee grounds, egg shells, banana peels, and manure (like what your bunny leaves for you!).

Be sure to exercise caution when adding things like coffee grounds or grass clippings to soil within your bunny’s reach, as ingestion could create digestive upset. It’s best to add actual compost at ground level, and individual ingredients to plants out of your rabbit’s reach. 

While rabbits are excellent in helping to clear weeds, some stubborn varieties need a helping hand. This list of DIY weed killers offers rabbit-safe options:

  • Vinegar and dish soap
  • Rubbing alcohol and water
  • Boiling water

Any of these solutions should be applied while your bunny is safely in their hutch to avoid any direct contact. Once the solutions have dried, it will be safe for your rabbit to resume outdoor activities! 

Bunny boundaries 

No matter how much space you allow your bunny to roam, you’ll need to make sure it’s both escape-proof and predator-resistant. 

The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch is an excellent option for the free-roaming rabbit. It’s compact enough to not take up too much real estate in your garden, and sturdy enough to keep even the most persistent of predators out. Plus, the added run with an integrated no-dig wire floor is an instant outdoor housing solution for your bunny! Incorporate the wire run into your gardening aesthetic by planting rabbit-safe trailing vines, or by placing potted plants alongside the run for easy-access bunny snacks. 

If your rabbit roams in a larger space, be sure to have their area covered with wire, or provide lots of plants that offer shade and foliage to hide from flying predators such as hawks and owls. Even if your rabbit is too large to be swept away by a bird of prey, these flying hunters can inflict injury on your bunny by attempting to pick them up. You can also provide escapes with the Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System of your own design, or functional garden decor for safe rabbit-retreats. 

To dig or not to dig 

Rabbits are diggers by nature. They create tunnels, burrows, or simply move dirt to create a soft and cool spot to settle into on a warm day. When allowed to dig in appropriate places, rabbits fulfill their innate desires and upkeep their physical health – which means happier bunnies and shorter toenails! 

It’s important that any rabbit enclosure nestled on the ground have a dig-resistant liner all along the bottom. Even if you forgo having a designated run for your rabbit in favour of free-rein of the garden, all fences should be at least 3 feet tall, with wire-mesh buried at least 6 inches down to prevent escapes. As an added layer of protection, wire-mesh can be fixed to the bottom 6-8 inches of the fence, forming a 90 degree angle with another 6-12 inches tacked into the ground using landscape staples. 

Be sure to check your boundary lines daily for any new tunnels that may present a problem. Rabbits are quite proud of their handiwork, and will often spend time in their new constructions, so watch for extending tunnels and burrows. It’s a good idea to mark tunnels to note their progress and to avoid stepping on the hollowed-out ground between an entrance and exit. Plant marking signs make adorable additions to your garden, and can be useful when marking rabbit construction zones! 

Any tunnels that aren’t headed in a safe direction should be filled with dirt or gravel to prevent escape. And be sure to watch your step – rabbit tunnel entrances and exits are just the right size to swallow a shoe and turn an ankle! For more ideas on housing your bunny outside, check out: Rabbit-Proofing the Garden

If allowing your rabbit to tunnel is not a safe or desirable activity for them, creating a network of Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System components is a fun and safe way to curb their tunneling cravings! By connecting Zippi Rabbit Runs and Playpens together, and adding physically and mentally challenging components such as Zippi Lookout Towers or Zippi Rabbit Run Platforms, your rabbit will be able to fulfil its frolicking needs! 

Weather considerations

Rabbits are naturally equipped to handle a wide variety of weather conditions, but a little help from their humans goes a long way! If you are transitioning an indoor rabbit to staying outdoors, be sure to take temperature into consideration and avoid excessively warm or cool days at first. The ideal temperature for a rabbit is between 13°C and 21°C, so aiming for days with mild temperatures will give your rabbit the smoothest transition possible. 

Of course not every day will have ideal temperatures, but after getting acclimated to life outside, your rabbit’s coat and instincts will adapt to the weather. But to give them an advantage, rabbit weather protection and rabbit rabbit run covers can bolster your bunny’s natural defences against the elements. Rabbits have a dense coat that will insulate them once they are accustomed to being outdoors in winter months, but an insulated hutch is a particularly good idea if you live in an area that experiences sub-freezing temperatures. 

Rabbits fare better in cold temperatures than hot, so if you live in an area with excessive summer temperatures, be sure to keep a close eye on the thermometer as well as your bunny. Signs of rabbit heat stroke include: 

  • Rapid breathing or panting
  • Drooling
  • Lethargy

Bring your rabbit inside and contact your veterinarian right away if you suspect heat-related illness. Frozen water bottles or ice packs placed near your bunny’s favourite resting spot is one of the best ways to stave off overheating. Your bunny will appreciate having something cool to snuggle up to!

Omlet for the outdoors 

At Omlet, we want your pets to live their most natural lives in the safest way possible. Our line of rabbit products are designed to allow your bunny to enjoy the great outdoors without compromising their security. Whether you have a background garden for your rabbit to prune, or keep them housed in a hutch/run combo with strategically placed herbs and edible plants to nibble on through the wire, we have the products to create the ultimate outdoor play space! Easy to set up, clean, and maintain, you’ll love your rabbit’s new setup almost as much as they will!

Rabbit outside in garden with Omlet Rabbit Play Tunnel with Connector Rings

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How to Prepare Your Rabbit for Extreme Winter Weather

Children outside in winter with rabbits in their Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch

Winter is highly anticipated by some, and a source of apprehension for others. Depending on where you live, your outdoor rabbit could fall into either category! Rabbits that live in states that experience long, hot summers look forward to winter with glee. The good news is that rabbits are naturally able to handle the cold better than excessive heat, and with a helping hand from their human, they’ll be ready to withstand the cold winter months. 

Your pet rabbit’s wild counterparts have multiple ways of managing their wellbeing in the cold. For instance, rabbits have a burrowing instinct, as the underground is more insulated and temperature-regulated than the outside air and at the mercy of the weather. But since burrowing down in the ground all winter isn’t an option for most domesticated rabbits, we’ve created rabbit hutches and accessories at Omlet to simulate the ideal conditions for your rabbit to withstand wild weather of all varieties! 

With a few minor adjustments to your rabbit’s diet and routine, along with products designed by Omlet to keep the weather out and the warmth in, your rabbit can spend the winter months in their element – safe from the elements! 

Cold-natured

Rabbits have dense coats that insulate them from both heat and cold. In the summertime, you’ll notice your rabbit “blowing” their coat frequently in an effort to release their dense undercoat in favour of the longer “guard hairs” on top. As the days shorten and grow colder, outdoor rabbits will shed less and grow out their insulating undercoat once again in preparation for winter. You’ll notice your bunny looking particularly poofy by the time cold weather sets in! 

Once they’ve donned their winter coats (courtesy of nature!), bunnies are right at home in the cold! Like their wild counterparts, most pet rabbits will appear more energetic and playful in the colder months. But their increased activity isn’t just out of joy for the season – it’s also to create more energy and heat to warm themselves up. Nevertheless, it’s fun to watch pet rabbits increase their body temperatures through zoomies, hopping, binkies, and social play! 

Multiple factors such as breed, size, housing conditions, and age need to be taken into consideration when determining how cold is too cold for your rabbit. As a general rule, most rabbits should be comfortable in temperatures above freezing. Once the weather hits 32℉, it’s time to evaluate how your bunny is faring. 

For more frequently asked questions regarding keeping your pet rabbit outside during the winter, visit: Will My Rabbits Be Ok Outside in the Winter? 

Blizzards and bunnies

Rabbits don’t mind a little snow, but if you’re in an area that experiences hard frosts and blizzard conditions, you’ll need to bolster your bunny’s shelter! 

One of the best ways to keep your outdoor rabbit warm is to mimic their natural tactics in the wild. Bunnies burrow, nest, and huddle together for warmth – all of which you can recreate for your pet rabbit. Insulation, both in the wild and in your backyard, is a rabbit’s best friend in the cold.

Think of your rabbit’s hutch as their burrow. At Omlet, we’ve invented all of our rabbit products to maintain ideal temperatures and conditions for rabbits – just like they seek out in the wild. By selecting a well designed home for your bunny, such as the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch, they will have an insulated hideaway from the cold that provides ample ventilation without sacrificing warmth. But unlike a bunny-engineered burrow, the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch is waterproof and predator-resistant for when critters come lurking. 

For frigid cold snaps, an Extreme Temperature Blanket is an excellent added layer of insulation for your rabbit’s hutch. Like any good insulation, the material won’t become waterlogged when the snow begins to melt, and traps extra heat underneath to further warm the hutch. 

Rabbits outside in extreme weather of winter

Wild winter weather 

The winter season is unpredictable at best, and downright wild at its worst! Cold fronts can come out of nowhere, bringing temperature drops and heavy sleet or snow. 

Rabbits, being the intuitive and sensitive animals that they are, can sense when a storm is coming. They can sense atmospheric pressure changes, which will drive them to seek shelter and hunker down. When seeking shelter, rabbits will choose the closest cover available. By placing a few Zippi Rabbit Shelters in their run, you can make sure your rabbit has ample opportunity to escape from the elements.  

But you can also create a silver-lining to those winter storm clouds by creating a winter wonderland play-scape for your bunnies! By using a combination of Zippi Rabbit Tunnels, Zippi Rabbit Platforms, and Zippi Rabbit Shelters, you can design a winter-friendly playground that will make your bunny binky with joy! 

Health and dietary considerations for winter 

Rabbits need different care in the cold months vs the warmer months. You’ll want to inspect your rabbit’s coat before the first cold snap of the season. Check to make sure their undercoat is thick and healthy, and that they don’t have any patches where their hair has not grown in fully (rabbits may have bare or thinned patches of fur from rubbing, playing with each other, or from nervous grooming habits). 

Make sure all water bottles or crocks are either insulated or heated to prevent freezing. Heating water on the stove or in the microwave several times a day to add to your rabbit’s watering device is another way of keeping their water thawed and palatable. 

Rabbits also ramp up their metabolisms in the winter, and they’ll need more calories to support and maintain their increase in body temperature. They may pass on a hot cup of tea or cocoa, but your rabbit will thank you for extra hay and hay-based pellets during cold weather! You can give treats as usual, but additional treats aren’t necessary. Thanks to their unique digestive system, rabbits benefit the most from foods high in fibre – the longer it takes to digest, the more heat gets generated. Timothy hay, orchard grass, oat hay, and meadow hay are all energy-lending options that should be available at all times to your rabbit. Pelleted feed made primarily from hay should be free-fed as well. If you’re feeding your rabbit a blend (feed that has coloured pellets, cracked corn, or seeds) once or twice a day, you’ll want to transition to feeding a pellet feed before the winter. You can save their blended feed for a special treat to be given in small amounts a few times a week! 

It’s important to remember that rabbits do not hibernate. In fact, they become even more active during the colder months! If you notice your rabbit acting lethargic or sluggish, bring them inside and contact your veterinarian. An underactive bunny in the winter is either too cold, or will become too cold very quickly! 

It’s all in the design 

Preparation is the best method for caring for your rabbit in the cold months. But wouldn’t it be nice to have rabbit-housing solutions that work not only in the cold, but also in the heat?

We don’t want you to have to swap out setups every time the seasons change! That’s why we’ve invented one-product-suits-all solutions for caring for and enjoying your pets. 

The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch was designed to keep your rabbit’s thermostat at an even level all year long. And, with an added Extreme Temperature Blanket, you’ll give your bunny the highest level of comfort possible to not only endure the winter months, but to enjoy them! 

And don’t forget that while creating a happy winter-home is important for your rabbit, playtime doesn’t have to fall to the wayside just because it’s chilly! An Outdoor Rabbit Run gives you plenty of space to create a fun playground for your rabbit that you can walk in and enjoy with them! 

No matter where you spend your winter, Omlet is here to help you and your rabbit enjoy this season together. Whatever the weather – from temperate to frigid- we’ve thought up the products to cover your rabbit from every angle!

Rabbits sheltering in Omlet Zippi Shelter green

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How to Create More Space for Your Rabbits

Rabbit using Omlet Outdoor Rabbit Run

Bunnies were built to bounce, and in their natural habitat can even reach a super speedy 45mph! Whilst your domesticated floppy-eared pets don’t move as quickly as their friends in the wild, they still need to be provided with an exercise routine. We’re not talking rabbit aerobics or bunny boot camp, but by expanding their living space, you can help your bunnies to stay physically and mentally stimulated. Unsure of how you can offer your rabbits more room to stretch their legs? Let’s hop to it!

Run rabbit run

Your gym bunnies need space to keep on top of their workout routine! Whilst a good hutch like the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch is great for keeping your rabbits protected from backyard predators and the elements, providing them with an outdoor rabbit run offers them the additional space they desire. 

You can extend your Omlet Outdoor Rabbit Run at any time should you need to create even more room for your active rabbits. It has a full height stable door, meaning easy access for you to interact and bond with your bunnies. 

Alternatively, add a run up to 13ft to your Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch, perfect for children to get up close to their pet in the backyard. And since evidence suggests that rabbits that bond with their owners live longer and happier lives, enjoying quality time with your bunnies is even more important than once thought. 

What if you could give your rabbits the warren their instincts demand with no digging in the backyard? Our product designers once thought the same, which is why we made the Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System! Simply attach the tunnel to your hutch and provide your rabbits with a safe and secure route to their exercise space whenever they want!  

Hop on in!

If your bunnies live inside all year round, or you’re considering moving your rabbits indoors for the winter, then a playpen is ideal. Whilst bunny-proofing your home is a given for those keeping indoor rabbits, allowing them free range of the house at all times isn’t always an option. The solution? An indoor rabbit playpen! Fencing off an area with a large indoor rabbit playpen is ideal for creating more space for your pets for those times when they’re not wandering through the house, whilst you can be assured they are in a safe, confined area. You can also accessorize your indoor run using Omlet’s play tunnels – designed by our genius product designers to mimic their natural instinct to burrow! 

White rabbit using Omlet Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System

Upgrade to a 2-storey apartment 

What if your rabbits could see the world from our perspective? Rabbits significantly benefit from having an additional floor in their enclosure, so upgrading their home, and creating vertical space for your bunnies will give them a new outlook on the world. And now that you’ll almost be face to face with your rabbits, platforms allow you to interact with your pets at an even closer level! Use Omlet’s Zippi Rabbit Platforms in your rabbits’ run to give them their own bunny adventure playground – perfect for pets who live in a smaller space. Platforms are also great for strengthening your rabbits’ muscles. A fit bunny is a happy bunny, and just like us, exercise is fantastic for improving their mental well-being. Since these animals are nervous by nature, a regular fitness routine helps to take the edge off, as well as being a brilliant boredom buster. 

Creating more space for your rabbits is one key to successfully having your bunnies live hop-pily ever after! After more advice on enriching your rabbits’ environment? Take a read of our How to Make Your Rabbit Happy blog.

Rabbit in green Zippi Shelter on Omlet Rabbit Run Platforms

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Can Rabbits and Guinea Pigs Live Together?

One of the most commonly asked questions from pet parents of smaller breeds of animals is whether or not rabbits and guinea pigs can live together. They are both small, cute and cuddly, live in hutches (or a super stylish Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch!) and like vegetables but that is pretty much where the similarities end.  

Can-Rabbits-and-Guinea-Pigs-Be-Hutch-Mates_Newsletter-Graphics_Blog

It used to be fairly standard practice for Guineas and Bunnies to live together, this was because neutering smaller animals wasn’t seen as a safe option. Things have most definitely changed since then and this is no longer a concern. The other reason behind this cohabitation is that the saying “breeding like rabbits” is very true! It was thought that by keeping guinea pigs and rabbits together it would prevent mass breeding. 

A rabbit’s reproductive cycle is pretty fast, almost immediately after giving birth they can conceive again, and even though the average litter size is 5, it could be even higher! The largest recorded rabbit litter is 24, born to two New Zealand rabbits!
So, if a plethora of bunnies is not for you then your option would have been to let them share the living space with a guinea pig. It’s company after all, right? Wrong, in an ideal world, it would be perfect, however, it is not always meant to be. 

Rabbits and Guinea Pigs are not really recommended to share their living quarters. Here, we look into the reasons behind why this seemingly suitable match made in heaven and lifelong friendship, won’t always be ideal. 

They have different diets

Many consider these small pets to be similar in many ways, however, their dietary needs are quite different. Even though both mammals require hay, vegetables and fruit for a balanced diet there is something fundamentally different about how they process their vitamin intake.
Guinea pigs need Vitamin C to ensure they have a healthy diet because just like humans, they are unable to synthesise the vitamin alone, due to a gene deficiency. Vitamin C is found in citric fruits and is necessary for survival. Rabbits, on the other hand, can synthesise this particular vitamin, and if they are given too much then it could make them sick. 

Housing them together and allowing them to share a food bowl, may only be meeting the needs of one, which could cause health problems down the line for the other.

guinea pigs enjoying food from caddi treat holder

Rabbits bully guinea pigs

This may seem like a bold statement, but it is a possibility and one to be wary of. Our floppy-eared friends are bigger and somewhat stronger than their smaller counterparts. When it comes to food, especially if they are sharing, Peter Rabbit could quite easily push little Mini Guinea out of the way and assert their authority over them. This would result in a tempestuous relationship, especially if your guinea pig is being deprived of food!
Rabbits also love to bounce and hop around as they are very energetic creatures, so playtime could be slightly one-sided and maybe a little rough for your guinea pig who is a little more docile. 

They communicate differently 

Picture this, you’ve got your feet up, you’re comfortable and have a cup of tea on the side and are ready to read the Sunday papers, and all of a sudden your housemate decides to throw a Hawaiian themed party and invite the whole neighbourhood. That’s a little bit like living with a rabbit (from the perspective of a guinea pig!). Despite both being quite sociable little creatures, guineas do like their own space and time to relax, whereas rabbits tend to thrive from attention, either from regular mating or huddling together with their companions, grooming each other. This type of behaviour can be quite stressful for a guinea pig. 

They are a different species after all and will not speak the same language. If they cannot communicate with each other then they could suffer from boredom and loneliness. Whereas if there are lots of rabbits and guinea pigs they will feel happier being with their own kind. 

There are health risks

Both animals can be affected by Bordetella bronchiseptica which is a bacterial infection that can lead to bronchitis. It is more severe for guinea pigs, whereas rabbits display very few symptoms.
Another potential threat is Pasteurella which is passed through saliva, for example biting. Again, this is less of a threat to rabbits but more dangerous to guinea pigs. If rabbits and guinea pigs are living together, it could cause health risks which could be detrimental to a safe environment. 

hutch for guinea pigs eglu go and hutch for rabbits eglu go in garden

How to keep them safe if they do live together

Despite the recommendation that rabbits and guinea pigs should not house share, there may be some exceptions. Introducing them to each other when they are kittens and pups means they may grow to love one another and see each other as friends, not foes. Bringing in a new guinea pig into an environment with an older bunny could lead to a hierarchical imbalance.

You might find that they share a bond or have become the best of friends, or you simply can’t house them separately. If that is the case then there are ways you can accommodate their differences. 

Create a safe space for your guinea pig

If your guinea pig needs to retreat for a moment or two then having its own space is so important. Omlet has created products that can be extended, interconnected and upgraded providing you with a simple solution when it comes to creating a unique space for your animals. Start with the Eglu Go Guinea Pig hutch which is super easy to assemble and clean. It provides that perfectly safe peaceful space for your guinea pig! 

Feed your pets separately

Rather than sharing a food bowl, which we have discovered could be problematic, feed your guinea pig separately from your rabbit. Consider having a different area to feed your rabbit, like in their own enclosure. 

Ensure your rabbit is neutered

Nowadays neutering small pets has become a lot safer and far more common, so it would be recommended if you plan to keep multiple rabbits or keep them with guinea pigs. Since we know that rabbits have the urge to mate constantly, this would not only be annoying for your guinea pig but it could also lead to back injuries, considering they are smaller in stature in comparison to a rabbit. By neutering your rabbit they will have less of a desire to mount their hutch-buddy! 

Friendly neighbours? 

Of course, there is no reason why you can’t have rabbits or guinea pigs. It is possible to create separate living areas so that they can sleep apart and have space for themselves (guinea pigs mostly), and an extensive play area (rabbits!) to keep them energised and entertained. To improve on this architectural masterpiece, provide them with a communal playpen, with an interconnecting tunnel system.
It’s not as though they can’t live together, it is possible, though it is not recommended and hopefully this article has provided enough information as to why. If you have experience of rabbits and guinea pigs living in harmony together or perhaps not, then please share your stories in the comments section below. 

children sitting in eglu go playpen with a rabbit conntected to zippi tunnel system

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How to Make Your Rabbit Happy

Rabbits playing in Zippi Play Tunnels and on their Zippi Rabbit Run Platforms

Is your rabbit a happy bunny? Of course, any pet parent only wants their beloved furry friend to be happy and healthy, so how exactly can you fulfil your rabbit’s needs? Here are our top tips for how to make your rabbit happy!

Good Diet and Fresh Water

First and foremost to ensure your rabbit is happy, they’ll need a good, balanced diet and a constant supply of fresh water. Just as we feel our best when we’re eating well and staying hydrated, so do our pet rabbits! In fact, a large cause of illness in these animals can be traced back to dangerous or wrongly proportioned feeding.

Therefore, a rabbit’s diet should consist of around 80% high-quality hay, and they should always have an unlimited supply available to them. However, hay alone will not provide your pet with all of the nutrients they require. They should also then be given pellet food with ideally a 20-25% fibre content. Muesli style foods should be avoided when choosing a feed for your pet rabbit. This can unfortunately lead to complications with a rabbit’s digestive system and cause issues with a rabbit’s ever-growing teeth. Take a look at Omlet’s range of rabbit food to help you decide what would best suit your rabbit.

Your fluffy friend should also be supplied with greens as part of their diet. However, just be mindful that leafy green vegetables such as spinach, chard and cabbage, whilst nutritious, must be given in moderation. To find out more about the best diet for your rabbit, read our previous blog What Should Rabbits Eat? which will tell you everything your rabbit needs to consume to stay happy and healthy!

Water Bottle or Bowl?

When it comes to giving your rabbits water, there are two options – a bottle or a bowl. Fortunately, Omlet has both to choose from! The rabbit bowls and water bottles section will help you to pick a suitable choice to suit depending on your circumstance. Ultimately, what it comes down to is that giving your rabbit water from a bowl is a more natural way for a rabbit to drink. Bowls, however, can be knocked over and wet your rabbit’s bedding. On the flip side, a water bottle helps to reduce water waste and helps to keep your rabbit’s water supply at one temperature.

Give Your Rabbit Yummy Treats 

As well as providing your rabbit with a healthy, balanced diet, giving your rabbit a few yummy treats will go a long way too! Omlet has a wide range of rabbit treats that can be fed to your pet (in moderation of course!). Most rabbits also love fresh vegetables so you can even offer these as a treat too. To find a list of what vegetables are suitable for your rabbit to remain happy and healthy, read our blog Which Fruit and Vegetables Can I Feed my Rabbit? for some further clarification.

Protection From Illness, Injury and Disease 

None of us like feeling under the weather, including our floppy-eared friends! Your rabbit’s health is paramount to keeping them happy! It’s important that as a responsible owner, you stay on top of everything they need to protect them from illness, injury and disease.

Omlet stocks a wide range of rabbit health and hygiene products, designed to keep your pet rabbit in tip-top condition or help them recover from minor ailments. The Options Small Animal Mini Grooming Kit is a great rabbit care product, which will not only mean your rabbit’s fur will be looking great, but will also help the both of you to build a bond.

If you are concerned that your rabbit’s normal behaviour has changed, or you suspect they are unwell at all, do not hesitate to take them to their vet.

They Need Somewhere Suitable to Live

There’s no place like home! Rabbits need a secure and suitable place to live, whether you’re keeping a rabbit inside your house, or they are in a hutch like Omlet’s Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch outside. The Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch is a great choice for pet rabbits, perfect for all year round and suitable to house up to two happy rabbits.

Rabbits also of course need rabbit bedding to stay happy! Omlet’s rabbit bedding is suitable for either your Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch or any other bunny home. Dirty bedding increase the chances of them developing horrible conditions such as myiasis, also known as flystrike for a start. Also, your rabbit won’t be happy staying in an unclean environment. In general, these pets like to stay clean and will look after themselves by licking away dirt.

Your Omlet Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch can also easily be extended to offer your rabbit more outside space. Rabbits need to be kept on their toes and with such powerful hind legs that can reach 50 miles per hour, they need space to run! The Omlet Zippi Playpen is ideal for making sure your rabbit has enough room to hop around to their heart’s content, whilst keeping safe. Similarly, the Outdoor Rabbit Run will keep rabbits secure when exploring, and since it’s extendable in width, length and height, it’s suitable for rabbits of all sizes! Find out about all the possibilities of how you can give your rabbits more space with Zippi.

House Rabbits Too!

If you opt to keep domestic rabbits as house pets, then the same applies in that your rabbit’s home still needs to be somewhere they feel safe and comfortable. You’ll need to rabbit proof your home for one, if you do decide to go down this route. This means that you will need to consider all potential hazards e.g. electrical cables, furniture, and house plants to ensure your home is suitable. Furthermore, if you are planning on litter training your rabbit, might want to consider neutering them. Neutered rabbits are a lot easier to litter train. In fact, an unneutered rabbit is almost impossible to litter train completely! 

Give Your Rabbit Lots of Attention

Rabbits love attention from their owners once they’re comfortable. And just like any other pet, you should interact with your bunny to continue building a long-lasting bond. You can do this via play, training, or simply speaking to them! Talk to your rabbit in a soft tone, and they’ll soon get used to your voice. You should be able to tell if your rabbit is enjoying your company with a few tell-tale signs that we’ll go into shortly.

Respect Your Rabbit’s Boundaries

As with any animal, it’s important to respect a rabbit’s boundaries to ensure they live a happy life. Whilst rabbits are sociable animals who love showing their owners affection and make for great pets, the average rabbit is also naturally nervous, being prey animals.

One way to respect your rabbit’s boundaries is by reading their body language and responding based on this. For example, a happy rabbit will do ‘the bunny flop’ when they’re feeling happy and relaxed, whereby they will roll on their back with their legs in the air. However, a nose nudge could mean your rabbit wants to be left alone. If you’re new to keeping rabbits, you might be a bit unfamiliar with reading this language. Take a read of our Learn to Read your Rabbit’s Body Language so that you are able to identify when your rabbit is, or isn’t, in the mood to play”

What Noise Do Rabbits Make When They Are Happy?

A rabbit will also communicate vocally to let you know how they’re feeling. The sound of low grunting and grinding of teeth means that the rabbit is content and relaxed. However, if your rabbit lets out a scream, this is their way of telling you that they’re scared or in a lot of pain. As you develop a bond with your bunny, it will become easier to identify how they’re feeling and their likes.

Do Bunnies Like Being Held?

Generally speaking, rabbits do not like being held. Even more so if they have not become accustomed to it from a young age. Therefore, for this reason, some rabbit breeds don’t fit in well with households with small children. This being said, breeds like the French Lops and Dutch Rabbits are renowned for getting on well with young children who will be tempted to touch the new pet! For a bit more breed information on what would work best, read Omlet’s rabbit breed guide.

Create Fun Play Areas

Healthy rabbits need to be kept entertained to remain happy and in the best condition they can be! You can do this by creating lots of fun play areas in their outdoor run space or make your house rabbit happy by introducing accessories to the home. Outdoors, the Zippi Rabbit Playtunnel and Zippi Rabbit Run Platforms are great ways to make sure that your rabbit is mentally stimulated. Platforms also prevent the risk of obesity and injury. Both of this are to be avoided if you want to keep your rabbit happy! Read about more of the benefits of exercise across multiple levels with platforms with our blog Platforms: Benefits of Exercise Across Multiple Levels.

Omlet’s Zippi Rabbit Shelter is also brilliant to add to your rabbit’s environment. Since rabbits have a natural instinct to seek a hidey hole, the Zippi Rabbit Shelter provides this desired protection from the outside elements, as well as being somewhere your pet can sit safely in, whilst observing their surroundings.

Likewise, a Zippi Rabbit Tunnel also encourages a rabbit’s natural instinct to burrow, and a tunnel provides them with a sense of safety and shelter. You can give your bunny rabbits their own warren by connecting their rabbit hutch.

White rabbits eating from a Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder on Zippi Rabbit Run Platforms

Give Your Rabbit Massages 

Did you know that rabbits love massages?! So much so, that rabbits who have regular massages are said to be calmer and less stressed than pet rabbits that don’t! You should always be gentle and move slowly when massaging your rabbit and use a long gliding stroke. Start from down your rabbit’s head, following on to their neck and back. Eventually, end at the top of your rabbit’s tail. It goes without saying that you should gauge how your rabbit is reacting and of course stop if you sense that they’re not relaxed or enjoying the massage. However, if they are, continue to gently massage around their neck and ear base.

Introduce Your Rabbit to a Companion 

Whilst your pet rabbit can live a happy life as an ‘only rabbit’, they’ll also appreciate another rabbit friend for them to live with. Getting companion rabbits is a good idea because whilst this desire for having a friend can partially be met with their human pal i.e. you, rabbits can potentially get lonely without a rabbit companion of their own.

Again, because rabbits are a prey species, they enjoy the presence of and find comfort in a friend. One reason for this is because it means not having to look out for predators by themselves. This can then cause a rabbit to be anxious. However, do note that if you do get rabbits of the opposite sex, you will need to spay or neuter them to prevent baby bunnies. There are also other advantages to this, such as reducing the chances of female rabbits developing uterine cancer for example.

Use Positive Reinforcement Training

Whilst training a rabbit might not exactly be the same as training a dog, rabbits do require mental stimulation. Training is a great way of doing this! You can even train a rabbit to do a few tricks like how to give you a high 5! Find out how with this How to Teach Your Guinea Pigs and Rabbits Tricks blog, but the key here is to praise your pet when they’ve demonstrated the behaviour that you have asked for and never to shout at them when they have done something you don’t want.

Give Them a Variety of Toys 

Finally, give your rabbit a variety of rabbit toys to play with! There’s a wide range of rabbit toys available, designed to enrich your pets’ environment! As a rabbit owner, it’s your job to find out what your rabbit likes best.

Don’t forget that getting a rabbit is a long term commitment. It’s essential to do your research to ensure you can offer them a fulfilled happy life! If you have a rabbit already, hopefully, after these top tips, you can get the spring back in their step!

White rabbits eating from a Caddi-Rabbit-Treat-Holder-on-Zippi-Rabbit-Run-Platforms

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New Rabbit Checklist

Bringing home any pet is an exciting time for the whole family. But just like any other animal, rabbits require your full dedication and the right tools to make sure that they get off to a great start and live happy and fulfilled lives! So, to help you out, here is our new rabbit checklist, so that you can tick off everything you’ll be needing for your new furry addition.

white rabbit coming out of a zippi rabbit tunnel

Hay/Bedding – A Must for Your New Rabbit Checklist 

A great place to begin before getting your new pet rabbit is by making sure you have plenty of rabbit hay/bedding. Not only is fresh hay an important part of a rabbit’s diet, but they also require plenty for their bedding. Omlet stocks a large choice of rabbit bedding to tick off your new rabbit checklist –  suitable for any rabbit home, including Omlet’s own Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch, to ensure that your new pet gets the comfiest night’s sleep!

Hay is also ideal for encouraging a rabbit’s natural instinct to forage, whereby in the wild, they would search for wild food sources. Foraging also helps to keep rabbits mentally stimulated. You’ll find that a rabbit who is only fed pellets from their food dish, as opposed to a balanced diet including hay, can end up eating too quickly, which can, in turn, make them unwell. Furthermore, a balanced diet for your rabbits will keep their teeth in good condition as well!

Rabbit Food and Bowls

A rabbit’s diet should consist of dry food, fresh food, and hay. Omlet has a wide range of rabbit food that has been carefully selected, offering nutritious and balanced options so that you can pick the right food to suit the needs of your new pet rabbit.

Most rabbits love fruit and vegetables, so it’s a good idea to include these in their diet too. Whilst you might associate rabbits with gnawing away at carrots, this type of vegetable can actually cause constipation in rabbits, and make sugar levels rise dangerously if over consumed. The Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder is the perfect way to feed your rabbits fruit and veg. Not only will it provide your bunny with entertainment, but will benefit you too by improving run cleanliness and reducing food wastage. So if you plan on feeding your rabbit with nature’s very own treats, make sure to read our previous blog Which Fruit and Vegetables Can I Feed my Rabbit? where you can find a list of the fruits and vegetables that are suitable for your furry friend to be fed.

As well as food and an unlimited supply of fresh water, you should also make sure that your rabbit has a food dish alongside either a water bottle or water bowl. Some owners opt to use a bottle over a bowl, but this really is your decision to make. Whilst bowls can easily get knocked over and wet your rabbit’s bedding, they are more of a natural way for a rabbit to drink. This being said, a water bottle reduces water waste and is usually better than a bowl when it comes to keeping your rabbit’s water supply at the same temperature. You can find a selection of rabbit bowls and rabbit water bottles in the Omlet shop.

Rabbits outside in their Omlet Outdoor Rabbit Hutch next to their Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch

Rabbit Treats

Whilst rabbits need to be fed a healthy diet, the occasional treat won’t go amiss! Treats are a brilliant way of rewarding your rabbit and Omlet’s rabbit treats are perfect for just that! Your new pet rabbit will also absolutely love the Himalayan Salt Lick Stone, which can be hung up in your rabbit’s enclosure and help them to get in essential minerals and salts.

A Rabbit Hutch That’ll Last

Your new rabbit will of course need somewhere to live! Add the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch to your new rabbit checklist – ideal for any prospective rabbit owner and will keep your bunnies safe from the outside elements and any predators. Even better, the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch comes with a hay rack, feed bowl and water bottle, making keeping rabbits hassle-free! Furthermore, the Eglu Go Rabbit Hutch has a removable bedding tray, which means you won’t have to purchase a removable litter box for cleaning up after your pet.

If you opt to have a house rabbit, you’ll need to make sure that wherever they stay, they are in a bunny proofed room. You’ll find it helpful to read our guide on How To Rabbit-Proof Your House for some more information on this topic.

New Rabbit Checklist Essential: A Safe and Secure Run!

As well as your rabbits having a hutch or home to live in, they’ll also require a safe and secure run to provide them with some extra freedom and time for hopping around, so this definitely should not be missed off of your new rabbit checklist! One of the leading causes as to why rabbits dig, therefore potentially escaping from their run, is because of boredom. We wrote about this topic on our previous blog Rabbits and Digging if you’d like to find out more information on this area. 

Fortunately, the Omlet Walk in Rabbit Run not only offers plenty of room for your rabbit to hop to its heart’s content but will also keep them secure and safe from any other pets or predators. The run has a stable style door, which means that the top and bottom of the door open independently so that you can throw in some treats for your rabbits without the worry of them making an escape! Alternatively, you can create the ultimate rabbit adventure playground with the Omlet Zippi Rabbit Playpen, which can connect to their run and hutch for more space.

Within your rabbit’s run, you’ll want to provide them with plenty of stimulation. Omlet has everything you need to keep your rabbits bouncing around with joy, from the Zippi Playtunnel designed to mimic a rabbit burrow in the wild, to Zippi Rabbit Platforms, that will provide you rabbit new places to explore!

Rabbit Toys 

Something else to tick off your new rabbit checklist is toys! Just like our other pets, rabbits need to play, which means they’ll need plenty of toys to enrich their environment and keep their minds ticking! The Omlet Zippi Rabbit Tunnel System connects your rabbit’s run to their hutch but also doubles as a fantastic toy that your rabbit will love. You can also opt for hanging toys that can be attached to your rabbit’s run.

Somewhere to Hide

Your new rabbit will also need somewhere to hide. Although it might sound odd, rabbits actually have a natural instinct to hide in order to stay protected. In the wild, this is done so that they can keep safe from predators such as foxes. Hiding is also a rabbit’s natural response to fear, if they feel stressed, are in pain, are unwell, or just want a break from social contact! Omlet’s Rabbit Zippi Shelter is ideal for rabbits to carry out this behaviour, providing them with a safe space where they can retreat to relax.

Nail Clippers

A rabbit’s nails should not go neglected, so you’ll need to make sure you have nail clippers at the ready! In fact, nail clipping is an essential part of rabbit care, and you’ll need to do so approximately once every two months due to the remarkably quick rate they grow at.

Whilst nail clipping isn’t too long of a process, if you’re not confident doing so, you can always make a visit to the vet and they will be able to give you a helping hand.

New Rabbit Checklist Conclusion

So, whether you’re getting a new baby bunny or rescuing an adult rabbit, hopefully, you will now be prepared for what is to come when your new pet arrives home!

white rabbit coming out of a zippi rabbit tunnel

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This entry was posted in Rabbits