The Omlet Blog Category Archives: Uncategorised

Pride of Omlet: Teachers Pet

This article is a part of our Pride of Omlet series, a collection of amazing stories which shine the spotlight on extraordinary pets and share their selflessness, bravery, talent and compassion with the world.

-Written by Anneliese Paul

Henni Hen is a teaching assistant by trade. A cute and cuddly chicken who loves children. She follows in the footsteps of her bubbly humans, Hamish and Verity.

       

Verity hatches chicks in an incubator every year at the primary school in Kent, where she works as a reception teacher. It’s a highlight for the children in spring, with lots of learning opportunities and fluffy little chicks make Easter even more special

It was natural for Henni to become a teaching assistant at an early age. She was, after all, born in a school. Henni helped the children with topic work and became the subject of many good literacy and science lessons. 

But Henni’s talent lies in her ability to help children read. Henni can’t read herself, but children who wouldn’t usually read to an adult began taking Henni to beanbag in a quiet corner where they could get cosy. Henni cuddles up and listens patiently to her young reader, giving the odd encouraging cluck. 

When Henni and her sisters became too big for the classroom’s hutch, Verity and Hamish moved into a house with a garden. Instead of rehoming the chicks with local farmers (like they usually did), they decided to take Henni and her sisters home. They’d been talking about getting a dog, but both working full-time, the chickens seemed like a good option.

Most of the time, Henni is outside, like an ordinary chicken, scratching in the garden or getting up as high as she can. But Verity and Hamish potty trained her because she loves coming into the house for a cuddle, and of course,  she needs to work. 

         

During the lockdown, the children missed holding Henni. So, Henni sprang into action and delivered both live and recorded lessons from the study that she shares with Verity. Verity read children stories, and Henni sat on her shoulder, making sure the children were listening. The deputy head called Verity regularly to make sure Henni’s doing ok. 

Being a caring soul, Henni also gave to the community over lockdown. Together, Henni and her sisters lay six eggs a day, so Henni and Verity decided to do a doorstep delivery service for their neighbours. At 10 am, Henni would lay an egg and make a lot of noise about it, so all the neighbours knew when their eggs are ready. Then, Henni would hop onto Verity’s shoulder, and together they delivered eggs to all the houses on their close.

When she returned home, she’d often hop onto her favourite perch (the top of the garage), and the children from the neighbourhood would come over to Verity and Hamish’s to see “the one on the roof!”

Henni and her sisters Megg, Gertie, Margot, Ginger, Rona and Nora used to live in a wooden coop in the garden and come into the garage in winter when it was cold, but Verity and Hamish wanted the best for them. So last year, they got a new home, an Omlet Eglu Cube, and now they’re cosy outside all year round. 

But Henni still likes to come inside for a cuddle and can often be found sitting on the sofa between Verity and Hamish for a family film night after a hard week at work. 

   

She’s just an ordinary brown chicken, and she’s low in the pecking order, but she’s got high hopes for the world. She’s very special to the children she teaches and the community she lives in, and of course, to her humans Verity and Hamish. She’s worthy of a gold star for an outstanding effort.

     

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This entry was posted in Chickens


How To Remove Pet Hair From Your Home

Everyone loves to stroke, cuddle and pamper their pet. Their fur is soft and warm, and stroking a dog or cat can help humans relax and destress. But despite these positives, your pet’s loose hair can invade your living space, settling on carpets, sofas, beds and furniture. It can be difficult to get rid of. So how can you avoid spending hours cleaning up after your pet? 

Spring is finally here and the winter fur is starting to fall out. Avoid being overcome with pet hair and make life easier for yourself in the days to come, with the Omlet tips below…

Removing fur to help pet allergies

Do you often have red, swollen eyes, a runny nose and experience persistent sneezing? If so, it could be because of your pet’s fur. Di dyou know, 40% of European cats are carriers of a bacterium: Bartonella henselae? Researchers thought that this bacteria could only be transmitted through your pet’s scratch, but numerous studies have shown that the bacteria can be transmitted through fur and fleas. This is why it is important to treat your pet and wash your hands after petting it.

Pets affect the quality of the indoor air we breathe. Hair and saliva carry allergens and can cause nose, throat and eye irritation, asthma and breathing difficulties. 

Photo de cottonbro provenant de Pexels

So how do you deal with pet hair? 

Useful techniques to get rid of hair 

Removing pet hair from your home doesn’t have to be a time consuming task. Here’s a few tips and tricks to try…

Photo de Sam Lion provenant de Pexels

Brush your pet’s hair regularly, preferably outside, but if that’s not possible, an easy clean area such as the bathroom may be just right. By brushing your pet, you allow it to shed any hair that may have otherwise fallen onto your sofa or other surface in your home.  You can gather the hair in one place and you clean it up much more easily and quickly. 

Protect furniture and areas where your pet likes to lounge. Your furry friend is bound to have a special place where he likes to spend time napping and grooming, and these areas can become loose fur hotspots! Try covering your pet’s favourite patch with a towel or blanket.

The ultimate appliance: the hoover. Cleaning your home is essential in normal times, and even more so when you have furry pets. This solution seems obvious and yet it is radically effective. Choose a hoover over a broom. A broom tends to make the hair fly around and instead of getting rid of it, you move it around to other surfaces. You can also vary the end caps to suit all surfaces. 

Use dishwashing gloves! An original but effective tip. Use a pair of washing-up gloves to pick up your pet’s hair in a circular motion from the desired spot. The hair will stick to the glove and can be rinsed away.

Use moisture to quickly gather the hair into small balls. Take a damp sponge or flannel and wipe the desired area. Some of the hairs will cling to the sponge while others will clump together. This method should be combined with other techniques to effectively remove your pet’s hair.  

The well-known method: the adhesive roller. Using an adhesive roller is particularly effective on your clothes, especially if you do not want to wet them with a sponge. The hair will stick to the tape and lift from the material. This technique is super effective on small surfaces. However, the roller soon becomes full of hairs and it is necessary to change the roller regularly if attempting larger surfaces in your home. 

Use specific brushes: velvet brushes, electrostatic brushes, etc. There are all kinds of useful brushes on the market. With a simple movement of the hand, they attract the hair to the brush and lift off your soft furnishings. 

Static electricity with tights! Don’t just throw away your frayed tights, they can be reused to pick up your pet’s hair. The friction creates static electricity and attracts the hair to the nylon material.

Ventilation: renewing the air to reduce the concentration of hair in one place. Whether you have pets or not, airing your home is essential to prevent the accumulation of dust and bacteria. You will eliminate bad odours and allow for fresh air to circulate the home.

Photo de Andrea Piacquadio provenant de Pexels

If you really need to keep an area hair-free, the most effective method will be to restrict access to your pet. It may be drastic, but you won’t have to worry about hair in your bedroom cuasing irritation while you try to sleep, for example. 

Adapted furniture that makes life easier 

Are you tired of your pet’s accessories collecting dust and fur? Invest in the right equipment and think long term. 

As well as keeping your pet comfortable, consider buying a functional dog bed that will make life much easier for you too. Omlet’s Topology bed provides your pet with optimal comfort thanks to its memory foam mattress, and also provides the ultimate solution for hygiene, by making cleaning your dog’s bed easier than ever. A variety of mattress toppers allow you to change the style as often as you like, and they are also easy to unzip to put in the washing machine, guaranteeing impeccable hygiene. Now you can easily refresh your dog’s bed to eliminate a build up of fur.

     

The Maya Donut Cat Bed also has a washable cover, and provides ultimate comfort for your pet. This bed is a neat, cosy size and can even be placed on your sofa if your cat likes to lounge around next to you. When you notice a build up of loose fur, just unzip the cover and put in the washing machine!

Omlet beds (Topology, Bolster and Maya) are designed from the ground up to be functional, practical and easy to clean. Omlet has designed feet to raise your pet’s bed, not only for aesthetic and decorative purposes but also for hygienic benefits. By raising your dog’s bed, you allow air to circulate, which prevents the accumulation of dust and hair. This brand new concept offers you and your pet a healthy and comfortable environment. 

       

Your pet’s fur will always be present, and impossible to eliminate entirely, however, these little tricks will help you to considerably reduce the accumulation of hair in your home and allow you and your pet to live in a healthy, comfortable and hygienic environment. 

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This entry was posted in Pets


Pride of Omlet: A Perfect Match

This article is a part of our Pride of Omlet series, a collection of amazing stories which shine the spotlight on extraordinary pets and share their selflessness, bravery, talent and compassion with the world.

-Written by Anneliese Paul

On paper, Kipper wasn’t exactly what Angela wanted. After years of behavioural challenges, he’s become the best-behaved blood donor and saved over forty dog’s lives. Kipper’s turned out to be Angela’s perfect match.

When Angela’s house was burgled, the first thing the police said was, “Get a dog.” Because a dog barks, and people are less likely to enter your home uninvited. But working as a teacher, Angela felt she couldn’t look after a dog, especially not an active breed like a collie. 

With fond memories of the collie she grew up with, she spent a long time talking to the Border Collie Trust, and they helped her find Kipper. He was an eighteen-month-old Irish stray and had been rehomed multiple times. Being a collie, Kipper had a lot of energy. On paper, he didn’t look right for Angela. 

But the Border Collie Trust thought he was the perfect match and persuaded her to meet him. So, she went to the rescue centre to get to know him. Angela could tell he was fantastic with humans, which was really important. So she took him for a walk and fell in love with him. A few weeks later, she brought him home to start their new adventure. 

Angela had prepared a lovely kennel and run in the garden for Kipper to spend half the day in. The plan was at lunchtime; he would be walked by a professional dog walker and then left in the house in the afternoon until she got home from school.

Kipper turned out to be hard work, boisterous and disruptive. He destroyed the house and was what Angela describes as ‘over the top’. In the evening, after a long day at work, Angela would go to tie up her shoes for a walk, and he would bite her hair, not in an aggressive way, just incredibly overexcited. It used to take them twenty minutes just to get to the front gate. It was exhausting.

But Angela had experience with Border Collies, she knew he had incredible intelligence, and he just needed things to do. Her teaching instincts kicked in, and with support from the Border Collie Trust, she began what would turn out to be life-changing behaviour training for both her and Kipper.

At first, it was simply stopping and waiting for him to calm down whenever he did something that was ‘over the top’. Then Angela needed to tackle the chewing at home. She started by leaving him for five minutes, going to the front gate, standing across the road, then coming back in and praising him for being good. Angela worked out Kipper’s motivations (toys and food) so that she could effectively train him.  

“He is so clever,” says Angela “, That he will work out. What am I being asked to do? What is the reward on offer, and is it worth it? And if it isn’t worth it, he won’t do it.”

Over time he made progress, and his behaviour slowly improved. Angela worked hard with him, and as his obedience improved, their bond grew, so did the trust between them.

Kipper lives on the edge of the countryside and occasionally chases livestock, so he has to wear a muzzle on long walks.  But incredibly, Angela can leave him alone, unmuzzled with the chickens in her garden. His behaviour at home has transformed so dramatically that Angela is confident Kipper will do whatever she asks him to. Angela has even watched a big bolshy chicken trying to steal Kipper’s bone!

“The chicken was getting closer and closer and closer, trying to peck at his bone. All Kipper did was pick up the bone and walk away.”

     

With good obedience at home, they started to have fun together. Kipper achieved Gold in the Kennel Club Good Citizen Dog Scheme and got to the Kennel Club Starters Cup Final in 2017, an agility competition for beginners. The activity and the mental work was fantastic for him, and they both made new friends, travelled to new places and shared memorable experiences.

But when Kipper had to have his dew claws removed, he couldn’t do his agility work, and the lack of exercise led to frustration.  Angela, always on the lookout for ways to develop Kipper’s potential, discovered CaniCross. Cani sports are a whole range of sports to nurture the bond between dogs and their owners and are particularly beneficial for dogs with behavioural issues. 

Taking part in cross country runs and triathlons, Angela and Kipper were getting fit together and making strong friendships with a whole community of like-minded dog lovers.

One of their friends introduced them to the pet blood bank. Angela was keen to give back to the dog community, but he was under the 25kg minimum weight. However, as he matured, his muscle development changed. As soon as he’d gained enough weight, Angela registered Kipper as a donor and proudly took him along to his first session. 

But Kipper was terrified. He had to have a little piece of fur shaved and couldn’t stand the sound of the clippers. Once again, Angela turned to training. The blood bank advised using an electric toothbrush to get him used to the vibrating sound. Over time, using his favourite soft cheese as a treat to reward good behaviour, Angela gently got him used to sound until she was sure he knew it wasn’t going to harm him. 

 

Finally, Kipper was ready to give blood, perfectly behaved. He’s now on his tenth donation, and with a rare negative blood type, his blood is a perfect match for any dog. With every donation providing blood for up to four other dogs survival, Kipper has helped save forty dog’s lives.

 

Kipper and Angela have experienced so much together. Pushing each other to do better,  they’re a winning team. Motivating each other to get on with life and do something good, to make friends together. As Angela says,

 

“Not every dog would suit me, and not every owner would suit him, but the Border Collie Trust got it right. We were meant to be.” 

 

   

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This entry was posted in Dogs


5 Easter Games to make the Holiday extra Hoppy

Photo by Freestocks on Unsplash

Are you eggcited about Easter? Easter is the second biggest family gathering of the year, so let’s celebrate it with some extra “hoppy” Easter games! This year, Easter will be celebrated in a small circle, but this doesn’t mean you have to miss out on all the great fun. Here are 5 festive Easter games that will keep the whole family entertained!

 

1- Easter Tic-Tac-Toe 

This is mostly played by young children but makes a great strategy game for adults too! To make this game extra “hoppy” for Easter, you could paint real or plastic eggs in different colours or decorate them to distinguish each player.

Players then take it in turns placing their egg on the spaces in a 3×3 grid. The player who succeeds in placing three of their eggs in a diagonal, horizontal, or vertical row is the winner!

 

 

 

 

Photo by Ulleo from Pixabay               

 

2- Hula Hoop Aim 

This is a great game for families or groups, where everyone will be entertained – and it’s super easy. Set up five hula hoops on the floor and assign a point value to each (example: the closest hoop is 10 points, the second closest 20,…, and the furthest hoop is 50 points). Give each player five plastic eggs. Have them toss the eggs into the hoops to see who can rack up the most points!

You can decorate the eggs together with your children by painting them in individual colours, so that each player has their own coloured egg. Let the fun begin!

 

 

Photo by Patricia Prudente on Unsplash

 

3- Bunny Hop Sack Race 

Old but gold: the hoppiest game in our top picks! Since bunnies hop, having a good old-fashioned sack race is a great fit for Easter, your children will love racing you!

Set up each player with a burlap sack — decked out with a bunny tail — and have them race to the finish line. Make sure you’re on a soft ground. Just don’t forget to whip up some yummy Easter treats for the grand prize winner!

 

 

 

Photo by Michael Schmid on Unsplash                       

 

4- Pin Rabbit Tails

This game is for the whole family! Get pom poms and attach double-sided sticky tape to each of them. The players then have to stick the rabbit tails (pom poms) to one another…whoever ends up with most tails on them after 5 minutes of playing loses the game!

Once the game is finished, your children can get creative and do some Easter crafts. The possibilities are endless!

 

 

 

 

Photo by Eliza Diamond on Unsplash             

                                                

5- Easter Egg Piñata

Piñatas are great for any celebration but they’re also fun to make! Kids will have a blast making these as much as they will enjoy tearing them down.

You’ll need the following suppliers:
balloons (small, middle and/or big)

  • craft glue
  • 2 cups water
  • tissue paper and/or crepe paper streamers
  • 1 cup flour
  • decoration
  • newspaper                                                                                                                           Photo by Cottonbro from Pexels
  • craft knife
  • wire, string, ribbon or rope (to hang the piñata)
  • piñata bat (e.g. baseball bat)

 

Step 1: Blow up the balloon, tie it closed and tear or cut newspaper into strips. 

Step 2: Mix water with flour to create paste. Dip the newspaper strips in the paste and apply the moistened strips to the balloon. Repeat this until the balloon is completely covered – three layers will help make the piñata strong. Make sure not to cover the knot. This is where you’re going to put the treats later. This part is messy but the kids will love getting their hands dirty. To hold the balloon in place while applying the newspaper strips, place it on top of a plastic container that will act as a stable base.

Step 3: Let the piñata dry for at least 24 hours, making sure to rotate it so all sides dry. 

Step 4: After it’s completely dry, cut different colored tissue papers in strips and give the kids freedom to choose their colors and start adding stripes with craft glue to cover the base layer. Decorate as you wish. Now pop the knot with a craft knife and pull out the balloon. Punch two small holes around the main hole. Tie a string or ribbon to the holes to create a loop. 

Step 5: Now fill your piñata with some delicious treats, like mini chocolate eggs, jelly beans, marshmallows or any other sweets… whatever you prefer!

Step 6: Glue down some crepe paper on top of the hole, or use masking tape. The goal is to prevent the filling of the pinata from falling out before you’ve actually hit it. Tie another piece of string, ribbon, or rope to the loop you’ve already made and use this to attach the pinata to whatever you’d like to hang it from.

 Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels                                                                                                              

                                                                                                                                                                                Photo by Eismannhans from Pixabay                                                                   

Here is a video about how to make a piñata and who explains it better than kids itself?

 

BONUS

Here comes an eggstra game! Everything’s a bit more fun with a little mystery. Check out this super cool secret Easter egg hunt! 

Let the children – and adults – hunt for the eggs but this time, write a letter on each egg. In the end, when all eggs are collected together, they have to decode the message and they’ll get the clue where the Easter gift is actually hidden. Example: if you hide the gift in the garage, place the letters “G”, “A”, “R”, “A”, “G”, “E” individually on each egg. If they put the letters together, they know where to go for a successful egg hunt! – You can also use Kinder eggs and put individual messages inside.

 

Omlet wishes you Happy Easter &
a successful Egg Hunt!

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

 

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Pride of Omlet: The Constant Companion

This article is a part of our Pride of Omlet series, a collection of amazing stories which shine the spotlight on extraordinary pets and share their selflessness, bravery, talent and compassion with the world.

-Written by Anneliese Paul

                            

Martha’s humans Nicola and Ben bought chickens to bring joy to Julia, their mother who they cared for at home. The family could never have imagined that a chicken would become a caring companion to Julia in the advanced stages of dementia. 

Julia used to have chickens as a child. She fondly told Nicola stories about dressing up the chickens and wheeling them around the garden, like babies in her toy pram.  But it wasn’t until her 90th birthday that Julia owned chickens again. It was a dream come true.

Nicola and Ben always thought they didn’t have enough space in their bungalow garden, but whilst visiting relatives in Ireland, Ben saw an Omlet ad and brought it home to show Nicola. “That’s just what we need,” she said. Their Eglu arrived soon after, and then their two hybrid chickens moved in. Julia named them Martha and Mary.

Whilst Mary was always shy and kept her distance. From day one Martha ran to Julia, Nicola’s mum. “She was mums best friend from the beginning,” says Nicola.

Unfortunately, Mary died and then there was a near miss for Martha. Like most people, the family like to let their hens roam free in the garden for a bit, but one day a fox came into the garden and attacked Martha. Nicola and Ben heard her squawking and went to the window. The fox saw them and ran, leaving poor Martha very shaken and suffering from a broken wing. But Matha was brave, and luckily the wing has completely healed. Now Ben and Nicola have extended the run so the chickens only come out when they’re in the garden.

When it was sunny, Julia liked to sit outside in the sun watching Martha. Julia had to use a wheelchair, and Martha would jump (in a very ladylike way) onto the footrest to warm her feet. Last summer when Julia could no longer speak in sentences, she’d make gentle noises and Martha would answer back. She’d sit for hours by the wheelchair with Julia, having quiet conversations. 

Nicola couldn’t deny Martha had a human quality. She didn’t just come for crumbs because she was there when there weren’t any. Martha cared. 

“She went from a chicken, running around the garden then in those moments with mum, it was like she knew. It was beautiful.”

Nicola began to trust Martha to squawk loudly if something was wrong. When she went into the house to make a cup of tea, she’d leave Julia in the garden with Martha. 

 “It was weird,” says Nicola “ Martha would squawk, and I’d go out to find Mum had dropped something, or something had fallen off the table, or Mum was confused because she didn’t remember where I was.”

 

Martha was the thing that made Julia smile every time, and her eggs brought so much joy to Julia in the advanced stages of dementia. Boiled was her favourite, and Martha would let them all know when it was ready to be collected. When Martha lays an egg, she stands at the edge of the run and squawks and squawks as if to say, “Come and get my egg!” 

Julia loved holding Martha’s warm eggs. Once, when Julia was having a lie-in, Nicola took her the freshly laid egg. She’d just woken up, and a big smile spread across her face, then she fell asleep again holding it. A couple of hours later, Nicola went to wake her up. Julia sat up. All of a sudden, the egg rolled out from behind her as if she’d laid it on the bed. Incredibly it was completely intact. “Are you laying eggs now?”  asked Nicola. Julia understood, and that made them all laugh. It was the happiest occasion, just an egg rolling along the sheet. Julia kept the egg in her hand for the rest of the day. Moments like that are precious memories to Nicola and Ben. 

Sadly, Julia died in September. When Julia was alive, it was Mum and Martha, Nicola says. She never thought she’d take to chickens. But having seen how Martha cared, chickens have become constant companions. 

I think we’ll probably always have chickens because they get under your skin. Well, no, that’s a bad expression. They become part of you. They’re like a little family.”

     

 

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This entry was posted in Chickens


Help, my chicken keeps flying away!

Note: from 14/12/2020 all chickens in the UK should be kept indoors to prevent the spread of avian flu. For more information, please see these articles: https://blog.omlet.co.uk/2020/11/26/ 
https://blog.omlet.co.uk/2021/01/27/

Help, my chicken keeps flying away!

It’s nice to have chickens in your garden but they need to stay there! Seeing them fly away and attempting to catch them again is not necessarily the easiest of tasks. It’s stressful for everyone and sometimes even dangerous for your chickens! So what is the solution? Cut off their wings? Obviously not, but here are a number of flap busting techniques that may help to keep your feathery friends on the ground.

Why does my chicken want to fly away?

If you are dealing with a runaway chicken it could be for several reasons. Each chicken’s character is different from one bird to another. While some like to lounge under a tree or in their chicken run, others prefer to frolic in search of freedom. This traveling and sometimes adventurous spirit can be associated with certain breeds of chickens. So, it’s not uncommon to find breeds such as the Leghorn or the Gauloise, for example, perched on a branch to rest. This is mainly due to their lighter weight in comparison to other breeds. Evolved with a fairly developed herd instinct, it only takes one chicken to take flight for the rest to follow suit.

However, sometimes your chickens may fly away, or even jump, not to rest but to escape a situation. A sudden or unusual situation can induce panic. A visit from a dog, the presence of a wild predator such as a fox, or the triggering of an unexpected high pitched noise can stress your hens and cause them to flee. They then have two options: run or try to fly. Under stress, fear and panic they can easily surprise you and fly higher than you think. They may even injure themselves in a panic to get away. So how do you avoid this kind of situation?

How can I prevent my chicken from flying away?

There are three main precautions that can be taken when you have a flight-happy chicken:

  • Choose a quiet but well placed area in your garden to set up your chicken coop. If you have space, keep the chicken coop away from potential dangers: roads, parking areas, children’s toys. Here, your chickens should feel safe. Their chicken coop is their home, they need to be able to eat, peck and sleep in peace.

  • Invest in a fairly large enclosure. Having a high enough fence can deter them from trying to fly and protect them from potential animal attacks and external dangers.
    An enclosed space, like the Walk in Chicken Run, is ideal for giving chickens a safe area to exercise and stretch their wings, without escape.

  • The third precaution is often known to chicken owners, but it is not often applied. However, this is an elementary precaution when bringing a bird into a chicken coop. It regards cutting the feathers of a single wing in order to unbalance your chicken and stop them from being able to take flight

    . But how to do it? Take a pair of clippers and cut the flight feathers, that is, the larger feathers. You can also cut the primary and secondary flight feathers. The feathers must be cut halfway for it to be effective. Rest assured, we only cut Keratin (what our hair and nails are made of). It’s like going to the hairdressers!

Find the tutorial video “How to Clip your Chickens Wings (Safe and painless) (Easy to do)” by here.

Providing a comfortable living space, and large, safe enclosure will keep your hens happy and healthy in their home. And if necessary, wing clipping can be an effective solution for particularly determined escapees.

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This entry was posted in Chickens


Holiday Pet Quiz: Omlet Edition

Holiday Animal Quiz: Can you identify the roles of these animals in these holiday movie favourites?

1.What does the Grinch tie to Max’s head in the movie?

Photo by Woodson’s Mom on Unsplash

A. A twig

B. Holly

C. A bell

D. Mistletoe

2.What does the Grinch steal from a mouse when he is stealing from the Who’s in Whoville? 

A. A piece of cheese

B. A cookie

C. A candy cane

D. A crumb

3. Who provides the voice of Rebecca the Hen in the 2017 holiday movie “The Star”? 

A. Mariah Carey

B. Keegan Michael Key 

C. Aidy Bryant 

D. Gina Rodriguez

4. In “A Charlie Brown Christmas”, why is Snoopy decorating his dog house?

A. For Charlie Brown 

B. For a holiday contest

C. For Santa 

D. For Woodstock 

5. In the movie “Annie”, what is the name of her beloved Dog?

A. Goldie 

B. Molasses 

C. Sandy

D. Butterscotch

6. In the movie “The Holiday” what is the name of Kate Winslet’s Dog?

A. Charlie 

B. Chip 

C. Jackson 

D. Pip 

7. What animal says the line “Bye Buddy, I hope you find your dad!” in the movie “Elf”?

A. A whale 

B. A seal

C. A narwhal

D. A polar bear

8. What is the name of Snoopy’s bird sidekick in “A Charlie Brown Christmas?”

A. Tweetie

B. Sunny 

C. Pebbles 

D. Woodstock

9. What is the name of the famous red-nosed reindeer?

A. Rudolph

B. Prancer

C. Dancer

D. Comet 

10. How does Rudolph help Santa on Christmas Eve?

A. His nose helps detect rain or snow 

B. His nose detects which houses are on the naughty or nice list 

C. He flashes his nose to the airplanes to make way for Santa 

D. He guides his sleigh

Answers: 1.A, 2. D, 3. A, 4. B, 5. C, 6. A, 7. C, 8. D, 9. A, 10. D

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Why Are Black Cats Said to be Unlucky?

In Britain, the fact that black cats are considered unlucky is a complete reversal of the original belief that black cats were actually lucky. It is white cats that were considered unlucky. 

The cause of this drastic reversal of fortune, and the fact that black is the new white, is transatlantic exchange. In America, which in its early days was obsessed with witches and witchcraft, black cats – the classic pet of the witch – were demonised, and that superstition has been imported along with all the other baggage of the American Halloween. What Halloween goody bag is complete without its pumkin, bat and black cat?

Are black cats a sign of bad luck?

The American blacklisting of black cats is linked to the days when British settlers were founding colonies in New England. These founding fathers were Christian fundamentalists, hounding out anything they perceived as witchcraft. Witches and their pet cats were viewed with fear and hatred, and a black cat was thought to be particularly demonic. They featured regualrly in witch trials of the period.

This classic US symbol of bad luck began to overturn the black-cat-good-white-cat-bad superstitions of pre-20th century Britain after the appearance of the 1934 movie The Black Cat, starring Bela Legosi and Boris Karloff (more famous for their Dracula and Frankenstein’s Monster roles in that same decade). The film was based on a short story by American horror writer Edgar Allen Poe, which was first published in 1843. The commercialisation of the American-style Halloween in the last few decades has set in stone these superstitions of the black cat as a scary beast.

Why are black cats sometimes said to be lucky?

The reason why black cats hadn’t been demonised in Britain was that witches and their cats had always been there, originally as part of everyday life. And there was nothing sinister about keeping a cat – they were the only means of controlling the mouse and rat population. The so-called witches were the herbalists and healers of the villages, the Middle Ages version of the GP. 

Black cats used to be thought lucky on board ships, not only keeping the rodent population under control, but helping to keep storms away too. Fishermen’s wives sometimes kept black cats at home to ensure their husbands were safe at sea. However, if the cat ran away, or if a random black cat hopped on board and then off again, it meant the ship was in danger of sinking.

In Scotland, the arrival of a black cat in a house was said to be a sign of good fortune. In general, a black cat taking up temporary residence in a porch was said to be a good omen. This is an echo of superstitious ages gone by, when felines (and not just black cats) symbolised domestic happiness. In Ancient Egypt, for example, the cat-shaped goddess Bastet was a symbol of domestic bliss and good fortune.

Gladstone – the black cat of Whitehall

The tradition of black cats as bringers of good luck still survives at the heart of the British government. Whitehall has adopted several cats from Battersea Dogs & Cats Home over the years, for the traditional role of mouse hunter. Many of them have been black cats, including the current holder of the post, Gladstone, who began his official government work in 2016. 

Gladstone the black cat is a social media star, not surprisingly. His popular Instagram page makes him one of the most famous black cats around today.

What is the superstition about a black cat crossing your path?

In some parts of the world, including Britain a few centuries ago, the direction of travel of a black cat crossing the road was important. If the cat crosses your path left to right, it means good luck; if it goes the other way, it means bad luck. Similarly, if the cat walks towards you, it brings good luck, but if it runs away from you, it takes the good luck with it. For this reason, chasing a black cat from your property is said to bring misfortune.

The ultimate symbol of a black cat running away is when it dies. In the 1640s, King Charles I was reported to have said that he owed his good fortune to his pet black cat, and that he dreaded the day its nine lives were used up. Shortly after the cat’s death, Charles – having been on the losing side in the English Civil War – was arrested and eventually beheaded.

Where do black cats originate from?

In folklore, the witches’ black cat has very deep roots indeed. In Greek mythology, Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft had a black cat that had originally been Galinthias, a servant of Hera (wife of the god Zeus). She had turned him into a black cat as punishment for trying to prevent the birth of Hercules. Shakespeare’s witchcraft-coloured play Macbeth features Hecate (although her black cat is not mentioned).

Putting all superstition about cats aside, a black cat is simply a cat with the maximum amount of melanin, which turns the fur black. Pure black cats are rare in cross-breed cats, and it is thought that only 22 of the recognised cat breeds can have completely black varieties.

The superstitions about black cats may all sound like simple good fun, but there are definitely downsides. Stray cats and kittens with black fur are harder to rehome, and there are stories of black cats being abused by revellers during Halloween. So, even though we may dismiss the superstition about unlucky black cats as harmless fun, it can still cause very real problems.

The truth of the matter is that black cats, along with all other cats, are wonderful and bring nothing but good luck. The estimated 200 million cat owners worldwide will certainly vouch for that!

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What You Need to Know About Avian Flu in 2020/2021

Important update on 19th March 2021 from gov.uk:

“The risk of avian influenza to both wild and kept birds has reduced to ‘medium’. The Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) requiring enhanced biosecurity will remain in force but Wednesday 31 March 2021 will be the last day poultry and other captive birds will need to be housed (housing restrictions end 23:59 31 March 2021). Bird gatherings are still prohibited. High standards of biosecurity remain essential as infection may still be present in the environment.”

Important update on 3 December 2020 from gov.uk:

“The Chief Veterinary Officers for England, Scotland and Wales have agreed to bring in new measures to help protect poultry and captive birds. The new housing measures announced on the 3 December 2020, which will come into force on the 14 December 2020, mean that it will be a legal requirement for all bird keepers to keep their birds indoors and to follow strict biosecurity measures in order to limit the spread of and eradicate the disease.”

 

Avian Flu is an issue that affects all chicken keepers. Efforts to contain the virus never result in its eradication, and the fact that it is not currently in the headlines doesn’t mean it’s disappeared. Many countries are enduring the avian flu version of lockdown in certain regions this year, and people are being told to take appropriate measures. 

There have been local outbreaks in the UK, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands in the second half of 2020. The current avian flu strain in Europe is a low pathogenic avian influenza, meaning that it is highly unlikely to spread from its bird hosts to humans. The ghost of a bird flu pandemic cannot be ignored, though.

The outbreak is thought to have originated in western Russia and Kazakhstan, following the same pattern as the avian flu outbreaks in the summers of 2005 and 2016. In both previous cases, epidemics soon spread to northern and eastern Europe.

This article describes the impact of pathogenic avian influenza, how it spreads, and what chicken keepers can do to prevent it, based on government guidelines and other practical measures.

What is avian flu?

As its name suggest, the avian flu virus is a form of influenza (flu) biologically adapted to bird hosts. Bird flu is not a virus specific to chickens and poultry, and in theory any bird, wild or domestic, can be infected. The reservoir of avian influenza is, indeed, flocking wild birds such as geese and gulls.

Symptoms of avian flu in chickens

Chickens with avian influenza will display various symptoms. They may be less active than usual, and will lose their appetite and show signs of nervousness. Their egg production will drop, and eventually their combs and wattles will look swollen, with a blue discoloration. Other avian influenza symptoms in poultry include coughs, sneezes and diarrhoea. Unfortunately, many of these bird flu symptoms are associated with other ailments, too, so a vet will need to make the diagnosis.

It can take 14 days for an avian influenza outbreak to spread throughout a flock. Some infected birds may exhibit no signs, even though they are still potential virus carriers. Others may ail and die very quickly.

How to treat avian flu in chickens

You can reduce the risk of avian influenza in your poultry by following the latest guidelines issued by Defra and the government. Vaccination of a flock at risk from the avian influenza virus is the only method of prevention. If avian influenza affects a flock, the flock has to be put down. Links to the latest UK government advice is given at the end of this article.

How to protect your chickens

  • Place your birds’ food and water in fully enclosed areas that are protected from wild birds, and remove any spilled feed regularly.
  • Keep your equipment clean and tidy and regularly disinfect hard surfaces.
  • Clean footwear before and after visiting your birds.
  • Ensure clothing that you use when handling your chickens is washed after contact.
  • Use run covers to protect your chickens’ enclosure from wild bird droppings.
  • Keep moveable coops in the same place – if coops are moving to fresh ground there is more chance of coming into contact with wild bird faeces.
  • Keep a close eye on your chickens. If you have any signs of illness, seek advice from a qualified vet.

Areas in the UK affected by avian flu in 2020

The latest cases of avian influenza virus amongst chickens and other poultry occurred in the Melton Mowbray region of Leicestershire in November 2020, with the other affected areas located south of Liverpool and in the Leominster region of Herefordshire. There are 10-kilometre exclusion zones in place at these locations, and there are dozens of other areas observing a 3-kilometre exclusion zone based on the risk from wild birds. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has an up-to-date interactive avian influenza map showing all the areas affected by restrictions in England, Scotland and Wales. Not surprisingly, areas adjoining the island’s various estuaries, firths and The Wash, are affected, and anyone keeping chickens in these areas needs to be up to date with the latest government advice and regulations.

The UK government recommends registering your hens (and any other poultry), which will ensure that you receive the latest advice regarding the flu. If you keep over 50 hens, registration is a legal requirement, as you are then, by definition, a poultry farmer. Farmers who do not comply with regulations regarding avian flu can be imprisoned for up to three months or face unlimited fines.

Advice from Gov.co.uk

“The risk of HPAI incursion in wild birds in the UK is HIGH. The overall risk of infection of poultry in the UK is MEDIUM; although it should be noted that the risk of introduction to individual premises depends upon the level of biosecurity implemented on farm to prevent direct or indirect contact with wild birds.” 

(Official advice about biosecurity can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu#biosecurity-advice)

“Bird flu is a notifiable animal disease. If you suspect any type of bird flu in poultry or captive birds you must report it immediately by calling the Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact your local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.

If you find dead wild waterfowl (swans, geese or ducks) or other dead wild birds, such as gulls or birds of prey, you should report them to the Defra helpline (03459 33 55 77 – please select option 7).”

*Advice correct as of 25th November 2020.

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What is the difference between the Eglu Go and the Eglu Classic?

The Eglu Go which we launched in September 2009 is the new version of the Eglu Classic MK 2 which was launched in 2005.
The Classic and the Eglu Go are made of the same secure weld mesh, are the same size and are both easy to clean.
With the Eglu Go:
Possibility of changing this into the Eglu Go Up;
Lighter Rear Panel which gives access to the inside;
Droppings tray, roosting bars and nest box all slide out.
With the Eglu Classic:
You can open the side eggport door and collect your eggs.
It is the only chicken house in the permanent collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum because of it’s cool design!

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Feather loss

There are several causes of feather loss. Hens usually go through a moult in the Autumn, usually around October or November. The first year tends to be a small moult affecting the head and neck area but the second year is a little more drastic. Hybrids moult more than pure breeds and often look ready plucked. The whole process takes around 3-4 weeks to be completed and starts at the neck, moves along the back, breast and ends at the tail. It happens annually to replace old worn out feathers. Sometimes dramatic total body moults occur where nearly all the feathers fall out overnight but they do grow back. You should start to see and feel little quills poking through the flesh which grow and open out into lovely new feathers which will keep her warm and dry throughout the winter. Make sure you provide a good quality layers meal for them because the moult takes a lot out of your hens. Don’t give too many treats as these don’t really provide enough nutritional value but wheat is very good as a scatter feed in the afternoons or you could perhaps give a wheatgerm porridge made with warm water to keep their little bodies warm overnight. Adding Poultry Spice to their layers meal or a Chicken Tonic to their water will help correct any mineral imbalance caused by losing and growing new feathers as they contain lots of minerals and will help the hens over the moulting process. Adding protein to the diet can also help so things like hard boiled eggs, tuna canned in spring water rather than brine which is too salty or live mealworms are good, protein rich foods. Egg production often takes a break during the moult as so much energy is put into growing the new feathers but once they are fully feathered again, the eggs should return.

Another cause of feather loss is feather pulling by another hen. The neck and back area tends to be a prime target, as is the vent area. You can get sprays to use on the bullied bird which make her feathers taste unpleasant to the other birds and this usually deters pecking. If the skin is red, sore or broken, separate the injured hen straight away and you can use Veterinary Wound Powder on her to help stem the bleeding and promote healing. Hens are morbidly attracted to the colour red and will peck at wounds until they are in a dreadful state if nothing is done so Gentian or Purple Spray is very effective as it stains the skin purple and this makes it a much less obvious target for the bully. You can also use Stockholm Tar which acts like a sticky black plaster, deterring further pecking whilst allowing the wound to heal underneath. With my own hens, I’ve found that some of these sprays cause the feathers to clump together though and this can make them more of a target for a bully so a puff of Veterinary Wound Powder or even household cornflour in an emergency disguises the sore area effectively and helps stop bleeding. If any hen develops a wound of any kind, remove them and allow it to heal for a few days before reintroducing them to prevent the wound being pecked.

A broody hen will pluck the feathers from her breast and abdomen to line the nest to help protect her eggs so if she’s displaying any odd behaviour or is clamped to the nest all day, this may be the cause. However, there is also a slight possibility that she might be allergic to any nesting material you are using. Some hens seem to have skin problems when they are in contact with shredded paper or some of the hemp based bedding. If you are using any of these, it might be worth taking them out and replacing them with something like wood shavings which are sold as rabbit/guinea pig bedding as these tend to be non-allergic. Sudocrem sold for nappy rash in babies is very soothing for sore skin in hens too so it might be an idea to try gently rubbing some onto the bald, red areas to see if this helps soothe any irritation.

There could also be another reason for baldness and that is skin parasites. Dirty vent feathers, lots of scratching and dustbathing, hunched or withdrawn hens and soft shelled eggs are often indications that your hen has an infestation too. Mites can’t be seen easily with the naked eye but they leave the skin looking sore, red and featherless. Lice can be spotted quite easily. The hot spots where lice tend to hide are around the vent, under the wings, round the abdomen and chest and the neck area. Ruffle the feathers against the direction of growth and look for little scuttling creatures or tiny cream eggs stuck to the feather shafts. If you come across any, you can get louse/mite powders from various sources including poultry feed suppliers/farm suppliers and some large petshops. Apply it to all your hens and repeat the treatment after a week to catch any eggs which might have hatched out. Depluming mites don’t respond to some of the mite powders on the market so if there’s no improvement, try one which has Pyrethrum or Permethrin in as these are very effective against this particular mite.

Red Mite don’t live on the hens but live inside the hen house and move onto the hens during the night so if you check in all the corners, pull out roosting bars if you can, check around the roof for signs of infestation. They aren’t particularly easy to spot as they are only about 1mm long and are grey before feeding and red after due to the blood that they suck from the hens and this blood sucking can lead to anaemia and lethargy. If you have a red mite infestation in your chicken coop, you may see tiny blood spots on the hens eggs and there may also be a greyish powder which can be seen around the ends of the perches. If you wipe the undersides of the perches with a clean white paper towel and find red streaks on it, this will show that there are red mite in the coop. Spreading Vaseline or nappy cream on the ends of the roosting bars and in the ledges where these bars sit can trap red mite too as they head for dark crevices during the day and any which do become stuck in the sticky cream can be wiped or washed off. To treat an infestation, you will need to remove everything from the coop which can be taken out and spray with a proprietary red mite treatment. Steam cleaners are also very effective for eradicating lice and mites from coops.

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Chicken Prolapse

It is very difficult in the first instance to tell or diagnose when a chicken reaches maturity if it is going to have any internal issues a sometimes can be somewhat of a surprise to new chicken keepers when chickens fall ill, but judging from your conversation it seems that something is protruding from the vent area, which as you suspect is likely to be a prolapse, this is where the oviduct or egg laying tube has been pushed out of the body in an effort to lay an egg. It is vitally important to separate her from any other hens you might have as they will be attracted to the redness and peck at it causing your hen distress and serious injury.

To treat the prolapse, first wash the prolapsed area with warm water with some antiseptic in it. Dettol or Savlon will be perfect. You may see that there is an egg in the prolapse and you’ll need to carefully try to remove this without breaking it. If you do happen to break it, make sure that you remove any pieces of shell as they may lead to an abdominal infection. Once the prolapse is clean, tuck the hen under your arm with her head covered to keep her calm and gently push the prolapse back into the vent cavity with clean hands or wear clean rubber gloves or even use a clean wet cloth to help you push it back. Keep the hen in a darkened room or box to recover and allow the prolapse to settle back into her body. Many people recommend smearing honey onto the prolapse as this has antiseptic and healing properties. Applying haemorrhoid cream to the vent afterwards can also help. You will need to stop her laying for a while to stop the prolapse from just popping back out again so keep her off her layers meal for a couple of days and only give a very bland diet such as wheat (weetabix mixed with water or Growers Pellets) and if she’s kept in a darkened room for a few days, this will also stop her body from being stimulated into laying. She may need veterinary treatment if it keeps happening and if it does, I’m afraid that the prognosis isn’t good.

Making sure that she has a good intake of calcium may help as this strengthens the muscles in the oviduct and will help her to pass the egg. Limestone Flour mixed with her layers meal will help boost her calcium levels and you can get this from animal feed suppliers in the equestrian section, you add a heaped teaspoon of this to a feeder of pellets or mash a couple of times a week.

Also giving lots of leafy green vegetables can help with the absorption of calcium into the body so would be a good treat for her, cod liver oil given in moderation can also help with the absorption of calcium. If you give a a tablespoon of cod liver oil over a week, this may also help. Don’t overfeed your hen with other treats though as prolapses are more common in overweight hens.

Also have a look at this topic on our forum with advice from the BHWT – http://club.omlet.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=62511

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Broody Chickens

You can usually tell if a hen is broody or not fairly easily. If she goes into the nest and doesn’t come back out again and starts making a very strange noise whilst puffing herself up like a football she could be broody. The noise they make is obviously different from the usual range of sounds and can vary from something like a very deep cluck-cluck-cluck rather like horses walking on cobbles to an ear splitting screech! Another sign of broodiness is feather pulling and you may notice that your hen starts plucking them from her breast to line the nest ready for the eggs resulting in an embarrassing bald patch on her belly. You may also spot a strange habit of picking up leaves, twigs, feathers and bits of grass and throwing them over her shoulders in an attempt to make her nest! A normally placid hen can turn aggressive and will peck you if you try to move her and the opposite can happen to a very flighty bird who will suddenly let you cuddle her till the cows come home as soon as she turns broody!
If you act quickly, you can get her to resume egg laying much sooner so try to restrict her access to the nest if possible, although this is usually very difficult if you have other hens who are trying to lay. If she sleeps in the nest, you need to encourage her to sleep on the roosting bars to allow lots of nice fresh air to circulate around her to keep her cool as she’ll get wonderfully warm and cosy overnight and that will just prolong the broodiness. If you put a brick, upturned plant pot, football or even a garden ornament into the nest, this will stop her from roosting in it but remember to remove it during the day so that your other hens can lay eggs. Keep her out of the nest if you can during the daytime. If you spot her in the garden sitting on a nest she’s made from leaves, twigs and feathers, make sure this is quickly removed and move her on or tempt her away with a treat or two.

The urge to go broody is usually caused by a rise in internal body temperature so a quick cold bath usually brings her back to normal and should stop the urge. Dunk the hen’s rear end and abdomen in a bucket of cold water until feathers are soaked. You can do this several times a day. Continue soaking until she stops being broody which should only take a couple of days depending on how long she’s been broody for. It sounds horribly cruel but they actually seem to find it soothing as they are so hot, bothered and cross that a cool bath makes them feel a lot more comfortable. Some people use an old towel to wrap an ice block or fill a plastic bag with ice cubes and put that under the hen in the nest and the coldness soon drives them from the nest. If your hens are in a run and she is determined to sit on the eggs at every possible opportunity, a trick we have used on our own hens might work for her too. We sectioned off the end of the run for our broody hen and put food and water in it. We popped her in there as soon as they woke up in the morning and kept her there until our other hens had laid. As soon as they all had, we removed the barrier, closed the coop door and let her socialise with the others. It took about a week of isolating her out of the way of the nest to break the broodiness but it worked and she’s been fine since. If your hens are free ranging, it’s even easier. You can make a separate run for her using some fruit cage netting or chicken fencing and leave her in there with food and water until the others have laid then you can let her out to join them.

You can let her sit it out if you like as it won’t do her any harm but you won’t get any eggs until she stops being broody and if she’s been sitting for a long time, this could mean no eggs for weeks afterwards. If she does stay put in the nest, try to encourage her to get up once a day to eat, drink and go to the toilet. Broody hens can lose a lot of body weight while they are sitting. It’s important that you check her regularly for lice and mites as they tend to infest broody hens because they aren’t dustbathing and preening as regularly as they normally would. A bad infestation of red mite can kill a broody so it’s also vital to check the coop carefully too as these mites live in crevices and corners of the coop rather than on the bird itself. If you happen to find anything on her, a dusting with a suitable powder or spray, repeated a week later, should remove any stowaways and there are various red mite treatments available for treating the coop. Once she’s lost the urge to sit, she’ll come off the nest and start socialising again and hopefully the eggs should start to arrive again.

A sick hen may also give a false impression that they are broody so be aware that she may not be feeling hormonal at all. A sick chicken will look completely miserable – head tucked into its neck, eyes closed, hunched up shoulders and a droopy tail. They withdraw themselves from the other hens and look unhappy and listless. A hen in lay or even a broody hen should have a bright red comb while a sick hen’s is yellowish and droopy. If you are concerned that she may be ill, it might be a good idea to take her to see a vet to get her checked over properly.

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How many chickens can be kept in the Eglu Go/Classic/Cube

Both the Eglu Go and Eglu Classic houses sleep up to 4 medium to large chickens, however the standard 2 metre run that come with them, are really only suitable for up to 2 chickens, as it is best to try and give each chicken about a metre of run each.

You can extend both the runs, 1 metre at a time, to make them longer which in turn allows you to keep up to 4 chickens… (If you want three chickens, purchase the standard Eglu with a 1 meter run extension, the chickens will be quite happy in a run this size)

The Eglu Go UP can sleep up to 4 medium to large chickens, but again the standard 2 metre run for the Eglu Go UP would only be suitable for 2 chickens. You can also extend the Eglu Go UP run by adding 1metre extensions.

With regards to the Eglu Cube, the house itself will sleep up to 10 small chickens, but with the standard 2 metre run, we would suggest between 4 and 6 chickens, 4 chickens if you were NOT going to let them free range and 6 chickens if you were. The Eglu Cube run extension can also be extended 1 metre at a time, and you can have as many 1 metre extensions as you require.

If you were to have an extension on the Eglu Cube run making it 3 metres long, we suggest the number of chickens be between 6 and 10 chickens, 6 chickens if you were NOT going to let them free range and 10 if you were.

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Getting Chickens to Use The Chicken Swing

How do I get my chickens to use The Chicken Swing?

Chickens being birds are a bit quirky. Nonetheless, they are extremely habitual and love a routine. It seems the older they get, the slower they are to take on new habits. They are pretty low on the food chain which makes it nice for us because their production rate is high – lots of eggs! However, this makes them cautious and wary of new things. It also makes them group or flock up. They prefer another bird to try new things first. They also remember things surprisingly well. Do you know they will always remember and bond with their hatch mates? They also remember things that scare them and things that reward them with food or pleasure. There are also basic instincts I call “Chicken Things”. One of them is roosting up high in trees. If they perch on moving narrow branches a lot of predators are unable to get them. A moving perch is natural to them.

So, with all that being said, how do we get chickens to get on The Chicken Swing?

Place the swing above the heads of the other fowl in your coop, if you can. You don’t want the swing spooking or hitting other birds (the light – weight design and smooth edges will not injure them.) They are quite able to jump up to four feet or more. A good starting point for full grown/ teenage chickens is twenty inches, or about your knee – height. If you have a small coop and cannot raise the swing that much, don’t worry. Swinging birds will not be able to get the big swing gliding motion or as hard of a kick off as with a full – height set up. But, they will still enjoy the gentler swinging movement of a smaller backyard coop set up. Other fowl will learn to stay clear. They tend to naturally stay out of the way of its movement.

Place The Chicken Swing™ free of obstructions as it swings. For a full swing installation, try to keep it about 18 – 24” away from walls or objects in the swing plane. Smaller coop set – ups have less swing so you can get away with having closer objects. Once they trust the swing, chickens grow more tolerant of kickoffs banging against the coop. (I think that is the goal for some of my hens.) If you have more than one Swing, be sure they can’t collide.

If you have a trusting hen, you can try placing her up on the swing and immediately rewarding her with meal worm treats. Once she is used to that, gently give the swing a pull to get it swinging. Give her a treat eachtime it swings toward you. Soon she will jump up on the swing and start swinging when she hears the bag shake. However, if you try to force her, this method can backfire on you. If the hen gets scared or feels forced, she will relate this to the swing and the other hens might follow her lead of fear. This will set you back. I recommend you do not try this with all your flock, but choose only a few, be very gentle, remain calm, and have rewards ready. Of my 30 hens, only 4 or 5 were taught using treats. Generally, if you get one swinging others will give it a try. I note that in my flock, hens that use the swing most often are not necessarily those trained using treats. Chickens tend to choose their own time. Some are very habitual while others are whimsical. Some are morning swingers. Some swing after their daily egg. Some hop on at odd times. Chickens are chickens, I guess.

One other thing you can use is youth. Young chickens have a lot more free time and are more willing to take risks. Introduce the Swing soon after bringing them home, or at least before they start laying. Not only is it an irresistible adventure for them, it is just too dang cute to watch them carry on and practice moves. I have had older chickens take up swinging. But results are quicker with younger fowl.

Start your chicks out swinging

Whether your chicks are bought from a hatchery or hatched in your coop, chicks will take naturally to The Chicken Swing™ in most cases. The design of our swing allows for chicks just days old to hop up and start trying it out. Its design is lightweight and will not injure them if they are bumped when a hatch mate or fowl of similar size is using it. You may set it up right in your brooder by using the “small coop installation” procedure. Hang the swing from the cross-member using some extra S-Hooks, or by re threading the rope. You can also use a broom stick or shower rod on top of your brooder box and install it similar to full swing method. Just lower the Cross-Member support knot (or untie it) and let the Cross-Member rest on the Side Tie Knot.

For the first few days, set the swing height about two inches above the floor. You may gently place the chick on the swing perch. If they jump off right away, that is just fine. Don’t try to force a chicken to swing. They will get on by themselves after your initial placement if you have been gentle. (No treat is needed with very young chicks.)

After they all seem to have gotten comfortable jumping up on it in this low stage, begin raising it bit by bit as they grow. It is amazing how high those little fluffs can jump! If you have different – sized chicks, you may set a stump or something similar under one side of the swing to help the smaller ones get on. Be prepared to spend way too much time watching them play!

A final point: my flock gets excited when they hear me coming. They stop doing whatever they were doing anticipating garden scraps or treats. This makes it hard to get photos of them swinging. I see them swinging the most when I look out the window out of sight. I had to stop fussing over them every time I went out there so they would just keep swinging when I wanted to take a picture or show them off to a friend. And remember peafowl and turkeys also enjoy The Chicken Swing™!

Fowl Play Products® hopes this information helps to get your backyard flock swinging. If you have older fowl, it might be tricky and take some time to get it going. The saying “Can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is sometimes true. In the end it is up to individual chickens. Not all fowl like to Swing, but we found a whole lot of them do. If you are unable to get your older Chickens to take up swinging, you may want to get a few chicks and introduce The Chicken Swing™ to them. Their example might set the mood for other fowl in your coop.

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How to Return an Unwanted Item

You can easily return an unwanted item to Omlet Ltd.

Please use the link below to the Royal Mail website, where you can easily create a free returns label. This can be attached to your returning parcel, taken to the post office who will return it to Omlet for free.

If you have any questions about our returns policy, then please don’t hesitate to call our customer services team on 001295 750094, Monday-Friday between 9:00am and 5:30pm.

Also if it is a large product you would like to return, then please contact customer services, who can arrange a free courier collection service for your items.

http://www.royalmail.com/track-my-return/create/110

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How to Return an Unwanted Item

You can easily return an unwanted item to Omlet Ltd.

Please use the link below to the Royal Mail website, where you can easily create a free returns label. This can be attached to your returning parcel, taken to the post office who will return it to Omlet for free.

If you have any questions about our returns policy, then please don’t hesitate to call our customer services team on 001295 750094, Monday-Friday between 9:00am and 5:30pm.

Also if it is a large product you would like to return, then please contact customer services, who can arrange a free courier collection service for your items.

http://www.royalmail.com/track-my-return/create/110

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Run Door Self Fit Kit

The Run Door Self Fit Kit lets you add an extra access door to your Eglu run or Walk in Run. Simply cut out a section of your run mesh, cover the edges with the supplied edge protectors and clip the door in place.(You will need some good quality pliers to cut the hole in your run panel.) If your pets move their toys to awkward parts of the run or occasionally lay an egg just out of reach, the Self Fit Door Kit is just the thing for you!

Note: The door opens inwards not outwards, so remember to take that into account when deciding on the location of your new door. If you are using it on an Eglu Go run or an Eglu Cube run, the angle of the Run panels will mean you need to mount it slightly higher to avoid it colliding with the ground when you open it.

830.0556C

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Aufbauanleitung für Omlet Hühnerzaun – Deutsch

Bitte klicken Sie auf den unten stehenden Link, um die Anleitung als PDF herunterzuladen.

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Chicken Keeping Course Risk Assessment Form

Chicken Keeping Course Risk Assessment Form

chicken_course_risk_assessment

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