The Omlet Blog

Date Archives: February 2020

Leap Year Competition – Win a Zippi Bundle!

🐰 Competition Time! 🐰 To celebrate the leap year we’re giving you the chance to WIN an amazing Zippi set up for your rabbits, worth over £600! To enter, head over to our Instagram account for more info!

Terms and conditions
Competition closes at midnight 01/03/2020. One winner will be randomly selected and notified within 7 days of the competition closing from all entries from our worldwide community. The prize is an Eglu Go Hutch with 2m run, Zippi Tunnel Twin Pack with Roof and Underfloor Mesh – Single Height, Caddi Rabbit Treat Holder and Zippi Shelter for rabbits. The prize is non-transferable and has no cash value. All Omlet competitions and promotions are in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by or associated with Instagram. This competition is not open to Omlet employees or members of their immediate families. To be entered into this competition, you must follow the Omlet Instagram account and comment on the competition post. By entering this competition, entrants are indicating their agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions. The winner will be notified via private message on the Instagram account they have commented on the competition post with. If we do not get a response within one week, the prize will be offered to a runner-up. The prize is not exchangeable for cash or any other prize. Omlet reserve the right to withdraw competitions at any point. Omlet may amend any competition, competition information, or these terms and conditions without prior notice. Any changes will be posted either within the competition information or these terms and conditions. Our decision in respect of all matters to do with the competition will be final and no correspondence will be entered into. 

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This entry was posted in Offers and promotions on February 27th, 2020 by linnearask


How to incorporate your dog’s bed in your home interior

Ever feel like your dog’s bed is just ‘plonked’ at the side of the room, standing out like a sore thumb? Or do you put their bed out of sight so as to not ruin your home’s interior style?

This needn’t be the case. It’s actually very easy to incorporate your dog’s bed into any room, like it’s part of the furniture. 

Utilise the space above your dog’s bed

If your dog’s bed is positioned near a walkway they could be regularly disturbed by people walking past and even tripping over them. Building up around your dog’s bed can ensure they have an enclosed space which is safe and secure from knocks and spills, while also allowing you to make the most of the wasted space that is usually above a dog’s bed.

You can easily utilise the space above the bed better by installing shelves or coat hooks, however, this doesn’t protect your dog from passer’s by accidentally standing on the corner of their bed or knocking them with the hoover. Installing a complete unit which completely encloses your dog’s bed with walls like a den, while also raising the bed off the ground is much more effective and beneficial to your pet. 

The Fido Nook Luxury Dog House does just that. The stylish piece of furniture complements your home while also providing a cosy space for your dog’s bed. The top of the Nook is an ideal surface for decorative or functional items such as plant pots, candles, photo frames and key bowls, and it is also available with an integrated wardrobe, perfect for storage of all your dog’s favourite things, including treats, toys, collars, leads and more. You can even accessorise the wardrobe with a sweet clothes rail and mirror to really make your dog’s new home their own. 

Match your dog’s bed to your soft furnishings

If it’s the look of your dog’s bed that is putting you off placing it pride of place in your lounge, kitchen or bedroom, it might be time to upgrade to a more stylish bed that matches your own sofa, bed sheets and cushions. 

Plus, dog beds are naturally prone to getting very hairy, dutty, muddy and smelly. You can be forgiven for preferring to hide that from visitors to your home. A bed with a removable and washable cover allows you to keep the bed smelling fresh and looking as good as new, all the time. 

The new Bolster Beds from Omlet are available in 3 stylish colours, with a subtle, woven, diamond geometric pattern, to suit all homes. The grey is the most simple and classic of the colours, while still being super stylish, guaranteed to fit in any home interior. The rich, forest green is perfect if you like a subtle hue, in your warm toned interior, while the vibrant, rose pink will be a hit with any lover of colour! 

Add the new Luxury Super Soft Blanket for extra comfort for your dog. 

A stylish upgrade

If you’re already happy with the positioning and look of your dog’s bed, but want something to tie it in with your home interior and really make it part of the room, why not give it a stylish upgrade with the Fido Sofa Frame? Available in 2 sizes to suit most beds, the Fido Sofa Frame turns any dog bed into a contemporary piece of furniture that blends into any room. 

Plus, it is effective in raising your dog’s bed off the ground; reducing disturbances and draughts for your pet. 

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This entry was posted in Dogs on February 26th, 2020 by linnearask


What Should Rabbits Eat?

All rabbits, whether they live in burrows in the wild or in a comfy hutch and are kept as pets, are herbivores. This means that they exclusively eat things that come from plants, mainly grasses, seeds and vegetables. 

The largest cause of illness in pet rabbits can be traced back to dangerous or wrongly proportioned feeding. Apart from life threatening gastrointestinal diseases, a poor diet can also cause teeth problems and weakened immune system, so it’s very important that you learn how to feed your pet properly. 

HAY

A wild rabbit’s diet will consist almost exclusively of grass that they find on and around their warrens. As grass contains very little nutrition, they need to eat large amounts to survive, and spend most of their days looking for and munching fresh grass. Pet rabbits won’t be able to eat this much in a day, so their diets must be supplemented with dry food, vegetables and hay to get the calories, vitamins and minerals they need to stay happy and healthy.

A good rabbit diet should consist of about 80% good quality hay, and they should always have an unlimited amount available to them. They hay does not only give the rabbits the nutrients they need, it also helps them wear down their constantly growing teeth. It’s not enough to just make sure the rabbits always have access to hay; you must also limit other types of food, as they will often be prioritised at the expense of hay intake.

FEED

The most common types of feed for pet rabbits are pellets and food mixes. Pellets are always the better option here, as it has a higher fiber content (at least 18%, ideally 20-25%) and is not as high in fat and unhealthy carbohydrates, like sugar. Pellets also prevent selective feeding, as the nutrients are evenly spread in each pellet, so that you can be sure all your rabbits get the same food. 

Only feed a small amount of pellets every day. As mentioned earlier, a rabbit that is fed too much other yummy things will prioritise these over the very important hay. 

GREENS

Fresh greens are a great source of nutrients for rabbits, and the different chewing motions will help with wearing teeth down. Try to give your pet a wide variety of greens throughout the week, and aim for three different types per day. Some good examples include grass, clover, dandelion leaves, leaves from fruit trees, carrot tops and parsley. Spinach, chard, cabbage and sprouts are also nutritious, but must be given in moderation. In general, introduce new vegetables slowly, and look out for any signs of an upset stomach. 

Make sure that the greens you feed your rabbits stay fresh by putting them in a treat holder, like the Caddi. This makes feeding your rabbits easy and hygenic, while also providing your pets with a fun and interactive experience of foraging their treats.

TREATS

Other vegetables, fruits and berries can be fed in small amounts every now and then. Avoid any “human food” containing sugar or salt, as well as nuts and seeds. It’s tempting to spoil your pet, but if it’s not done in moderation, your rabbit might end up obese and ill.

It’s also important to note that some fruit and vegetables are dangerous or even toxic to rabbits, and must be avoided at all times. Before you try something new, make sure you check that it is okay for rabbits. 

CAECOTROPHES

In order to get the most nutrients out of the food they eat, a rabbit will produce small, dark, grape-like balls, different from the normal pellets, that they eat straight from their bum. It may seem strange to us, but it’s very important that they eat these extremely nutritious snacks. 

If you notice lots of these caecotrophes scattered around the hutch, or if they are getting stuck in the fur around the rabbit’s bottom, it’s a sign that the rabbit’s diet is too rich. Try cutting down on pellets and add more hay, and contact your vet if the problem persists.

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This entry was posted in Rabbits on February 25th, 2020 by linnearask


Why Are Chicken Eggs Different Colours?

The ancestor of all chickens is the Red Junglefowl, Gallus gallus, a native of South-east Asia. All Junglefowl eggs have shells of a creamy white colour. And yet, as any chicken keeper knows, the eggs of domestic hens can vary widely.

Many years ago British chicken egg producers realised that shoppers favoured brown eggs, and turned their noses up at white ones. It was even said that brown eggs were more nutritious (which is not the case – all chicken eggs have the same nutritional value).

This tyranny of supermarket brown eggs continued until about 20 years ago, when a niche market was created for eggs from specific breeds. Chocolate browns, blues, and even the much-maligned whites, all began to appear on the shelves.

But for anyone familiar with backyard chickens, this was nothing new. Pearly whites from the Sussex and Leghorn, lovely blues from the Ameraucana and Cream Legbar, red-brown beauties from the Barnevelder and Welsummer and the dreamy greeny-blue of the Araucana and Favaucana are all in a day’s egg-collecting.

But why, given the fact that those ancestral chickens all laid creamy white eggs, do these different colours exist?

Egg Painting – the Natural Way

An egg takes around 26 hours to fully form inside a hen. Twenty of those hours are dedicated to toughening and colouring the egg shell. Layers of calcium carbonate provide the toughening – which is why hens need plenty of calcium in their diets – and the colouring is down to pigments. Calcium carbonate is naturally white, so any other colour has to be ‘painted on’, from the inside.

Breeders have created hundreds of chicken varieties over the centuries, and each of these has distinctive plumage and colouring. The pigments that give feathers colour sometimes go hand in hand with specific pigments for colouring egg shells too.

For example, the Ameraucana carries the blue pigment biliverdin, and this is painted onto the shell in the later stages of the egg’s development in the oviduct. Both the outside and inside of the shell have the same blue colour.

This is not the case with a standard brown egg. Crack one open and you’ll notice it’s white on the inside. The pigment responsible for brown colouring is protoporphyrin. This is present to a greater or lesser degree on the majority of chickens. Even eggs of a creamy colour have a hint of protoporphyrin in their shells. Hens carrying an excess of the pigment – such as the Delaware and Marans – produce fabulous chocolate brown eggs.

Many hens lay brown eggs dappled with darker brown spots and streaks. The Neera and Welsummer are good examples of this. The effect is causes by the egg turning as it makes its way through the oviduct, and it is a common feature in the eggs of many wild bird species. It is details like this that enable owners to recognise eggs from their individual birds (in a small flock, that is!)

When the two types of pigment – the blue and the brown – are mixed together, the result is a greenish blue or olive colour. If the brown pigment is light, as in the Favaucana and Araucana, the eggs are a soft greeny blue. With a darker brown in the mix, the olive colour is increased, as in the aptly named Olive Egger.

What Colour Are Your Chickens’ Earlobes?

It can come as a shock to learn that chickens have earlobes. Even more surprising to hear that these lobes give a clue to the colour of egg shells.

The earlobes are obvious, once they’ve been pointed out. Chickens have three types of ‘wattle’ – the red crest, the wobbly ones on the throat, and the ones on the side of the head, towards the back – the earlobes.

White earlobes are found on hens with white or otherwise pale plumage. These birds have relatively small amounts of pigment, hence the light feathers. The same rule applies to the eggs – no pigment, and hence white eggs. Meanwhile, hens with brown or reddish earlobes lay brown eggs, and ones with a creamy, pearly, shiny white earlobes lay blue eggs.

These days, ironically, it is the non-standard-brown eggs that command the higher prices in the shops. And yet once you get a clutch of golden-yoked, grass-fed, free range chicken eggs cooking side by side in a pan, you can’t tell which shell produced which egg. When it comes to chicken eggs, beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder – and the earlobe of the chicken!


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This entry was posted in Chickens on February 19th, 2020 by linnearask


Why Do Cats Need a Scratching Post?

When a cat scratches a wall or post, it’s a sign that strong winds are about to rattle the rafters. If the cat scratches the legs of your table, it means a change in the weather. According to old British folklore, that is…

In reality, cats scratch for personal reasons – not to alert you to things your weather app may have missed! But the folklore underlines something very true – the fact that cats will happily run their claws up and down your household treasures. That’s why a tailor-made scratching post is a must for all pet cats.

There’s no doubt that cats enjoy the sensation of scratching. But there are two practical reasons for the behaviour. Cats trim their nails by clawing against hard or rough surfaces, so a scratching post is a kind of manicure station. Scratching also lets them have a good, general body stretch.

Cats also have scent glands in their paws (to match the ones on their cheeks – that’s what they’re up to when they brush against your legs). When scratching, they are also scent-marking, to tell the world that this particular territory belongs to them.

It’s not just domestic cats that do this. Tigers, for example, scent-mark trees, gouging them with their enormous claws as they do so.

Learning From Scratch

Pet cats that spend a lot of time outdoors will not scratch as much in the home. Their nails will be kept in good shape the natural way as the animal roams its wider territory. Cats will also, like tigers, take advantage of trees and other natural scratching stations.

If your cat spends little time outdoors, the urge for indoor scratching will be strong. You can reinforce desirable scratching behaviour by showering the cat with praise and affection when it uses the scratching post, and gently discouraging it if it tries to get its claws up close and personal to the furniture. It’s important not to simply cuddle the cat to stop it clawing, as your pet may interpret this as attention. The assumption “My Claws + Your Furniture = Quality Time With You” is one you need to discourage.

Cat Scratch Posts – Feline Groovy

A persistent furniture- or curtain-scratcher will need to break the habit. Covering the cat’s favourite table leg, sofa arm, etc., with kitchen foil, double-sided sticky tape or shiny plastic sheeting usually does the trick. The cat doesn’t like the feel of its claws on these surfaces.

Odours can deter persistent scratchers too. Citrus and menthol are two scents that most moggies will keep away from.

Another trick is to buy (or make) a scratching post and place it next to the piece of furniture the cat has been scratching. A sprinkle of catnip will make the new scratch post irresistible. Once the cat has engaged, the post can be moved somewhere more convenient.

It’s important that the scratching post is appealing to your pet. It will need a wide, heavy base to prevent it from wobbling or falling over during clawing, and should be tall enough to accommodate your cat at full stretch – between 60cm and 90cm. Make sure the material attached to the post has vertical grooves, rather than horizontal. Corrugated fibre boards work well, or materials with a vertical weave. This will ease the scratching process, and also minimise the chance of a claw snagging in the material (something to be aware of if you’re making your own post).

A scratching mat is another option, although many cats seem to prefer stretching upwards to scratch. This may be something to do with getting their scent spread at optimal height for feline passers-by to sniff at.

Identifying the Claws of Stress

Cats sometimes claw when they’re stressed, and that’s when your furniture is in real danger from cat-scratch-fever. Identifying the source of stress is important. It could be another cat, another pet (usually a dog), or even a child in the house whose rough handling has freaked out the poor puss. On the other hand it could be a noisy household appliance, or some regular noise from outside the home, such as aircraft or hyperactive car alarms.

As far as possible, remove or minimise the source of stress. Provide a second scratch post too. If you have more than one cat, it’s a good idea to give them each a separate post to call their own.

And just out of interest, next time your cat has a prolonged scratch at its post, take a look outside. Is it getting windier? Is the weather on the change? After all, those weather apps don’t get it right every time.


Are you looking for a new scratching post for your feline friend? We currently have an amazing offer on the Igloo Cat Scratching posts. This sturdy scratching post is attached to a soft square fabric base and is suitable for use by all types of cat. By combining it with the innovative Grooming Mat you can create a neat 2-in-1 scratcher and grooming device for your cat, making sure your furniture stays clear from fur, dander and sharp claws while also giving your cat an opportunity to stretch and mark their territory.

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This entry was posted in Cats on February 17th, 2020 by linnearask


End of Season Sale – Up to 20% Off Covers

Even if we might start to see the light at the end of this winter tunnel, there is a risk we’ve still got some frosty mornings and cold sleet to come. Take this opportunity to accessories your pets’ run with a cover that will keep them dry from rain, sheltered from wind and shaded from the sun – all year round!

Browse our amazing selection of covers to find one for your pets. For a limited time only you know get up to 20% off!

Terms and Conditions:
Promotion runs from 17/02/20 – midnight 29/02/20, while stocks last. No promo code required. Discount varies up to 20% off and applies to all Run Covers, Extreme Temperature Protection and Zippi Run Covers. Exclusions include; Heavy Duty Cover for Eglu Classic – Full Length, Bungee Hook Single and Bungee Hooks Pack of 6. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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This entry was posted in Offers and promotions on February 17th, 2020 by linnearask


Why Do Chickens’ Legs Not Get Cold In Winter?

Watching chickens scratch at the frozen ground or strut through the snow, you might wonder how they manage to keep their feet and legs warm. After all, this is one part of their body with no feathers to keep it cosy (unless you happen to have a feathery-legged breed such as the Cochin, Brahma or Silkie).

Surprisingly, the simple answer to ‘How do they keep their leg warm?’ is ‘They don’t!’ Those skinny, bare legs have scales, which retain heat to a certain extent, but they will still get very cold if the bird stands still for too long.

And that’s the important detail. A chicken keeps its legs warm by moving, and by not keeping all its toes on the ground for too long. These parts of their body lose heat rapidly; but the solution is quite simple.

Perching is the most effective way of retaining heat. A hen hunkers down when roosting, and her legs are tucked into her warm body. If space allows, install a flat perch too. A piece of wood with a 10 cm width will enable the hens to roost without having to grip the perch, which in really cold weather will prevent their toes freezing. (The lucky ones will simply snuggle down in a nesting box, which is the chicken equivalent of a thick quilt!)

But of course, a hungry hen doesn’t want to waste the whole day perching, so even in the coldest spells she will make a lot of contact with the ground.

One-Legged Hens

Like many other birds, chickens often adopt the ‘one leg’ look, tucking one of their limbs up into the warmth of their bellies. This reduces overall heat loss and stops feet and toes from freezing on the icy ground.

An upturned pot, a log, pallet or other slightly elevated space – cleared of snow or ice – will help the hens get the circulation going again, without having to catch their breath on the frozen ground. Like all birds, chickens are warm-blooded, just like us, and their own body heat soon works its magic. Indeed, with an average body temperature of around 41°C, chickens can remain active in the coldest weather.

The leg-warming process is helped by other tricks, too. Fluffing up the feathers retains body heat, by trapping small pockets of air which are then heated up by the bird’s warm body.

Some owners give their hens a supper of corn and grains, which take longer to digest than a standard pellet or other chicken food. Part of the digestion process involves producing heat – a kind of internal hot water bottle!

In general, hens will eat more food in the cold months, as more of their energy is spent keeping warm. Some owners like to supplement the birds’ diets with extra protein or a little suet, to increase their fat levels for the winter. Fat retains heat, and the whole bird benefits – not just the legs (which will remain as thin as ever!)

Help With The Heating

You can help your hens keep their toes cosy by making sure the coop is clean and dry. Clear out any snow dragged in on the birds’ feet, and keep an insulating layer of straw on the floor. You can give the birds extra protection by insulating the coop – although there should still be some ventilation, to allow the gases released from the birds’ droppings to escape.

You can install an automatic door to help keep the living quarters snug. Heaters are also available – but never use anything other than a heater designed specifically for hen houses. It’s also best to use these only if the temperature gets below -5°C, otherwise hens may get used to being cosy all the time, and that could be disastrous if the heater fails and the birds are suddenly exposed. Heat-pampered poultry can die of cold shock.

A coop should be draft-free, but not completely sealed, as ventilation is important for healthy hens. During the day, a sheltered spot in the run or garden will help them take a breather and warm those long-suffering legs.

Chickens are amazingly hardy, and although not exactly warm, their legs will be able to cope with anything the average winter throws at them. As long as they can toast their toes on a nice perch every now and then…

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This entry was posted in Chickens on February 14th, 2020 by linnearask


Why Do Some Animals Have Paws?

Have you ever looked at your pets’ paws and wondered why? Why don’t they have hands and fingers like us? The answer dates back thousands of years and is the result of our pets’ ancestors adapting to the independent and wild lives they once lived in an environment which was very different to your safe, warm home. 

The History of the Paw

Before our pets were domesticated, they had to defend themselves to stay alive while hunting for their own food. Many of the traits that helped them do that haven’t changed, staying with the species’ throughout evolution. This includes the paw

Dogs and cats are the main paw-ed animals that may come to mind. But before we had house cats and dogs, there were generations of wild cats and wolves. The purpose of the paw is largely related to sound and shock absorption. The fatty tissue inside the pads helps animals jump and land without pain or noise, especially helpful for silently hunting prey in the wild while protecting limbs from impact. 

A dog's paw pad

The paw pads are also much rougher when the animal is subject to extreme surfaces day in, day out. This assists with grip in treacherous or slippery conditions, working in a similar way to human shoes. For our domestic pets, the paw pads are often much smoother as conditions are easier underfoot. Some dog breeds still have webbed feet to help them swim, an adaptation that wolves passed on and still benefit from.

While paws are well adapted for walking and jumping around, debris can sometimes get stuck in the paw pads and cause pain. If you spot your pet chewing at their paw or limping and lifting it off the ground, carefully check their paw pad for any stones or splinters that may need removing. If your rabbit or guinea pigs paws look sore it could be a sign that their bedding is too scratchy. 

What can the paw tell us?

Did you know, that some animals use their paw pads to keep cool and release sweat? So damp paw prints could mean your pet needs some help cooling down.

Pet’s paws can sometimes tell us a little bit about how they are feeling, too. For example, cats will knead blankets, beds, pillows and even humans with their paws when they are feeling happy and content. There’s lots of reasons why this may be; it might remind them of nursing from their Mother, they could be trying to create a cosy spot to sleep, or they could be using the scent glands in their paw pads to mark their territory. 

Have you also noticed your cat doesn’t like their paws to be touched? This is because the pads are extremely sensitive to touch, but some cats can be trained to tolerate their paws being touched, often easier if done from a young age, so if your cat does let you touch their paws it could be a sign of trust. 

More info here and here.

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This entry was posted in Cats on February 12th, 2020 by chloewelch


Don’t Leave Your Pet Out of Date Night

With Valentine’s Day approaching many of us will be making restaurant bookings and buying cinema tickets for a night out with their partner. Sure, that’s nice, but wouldn’t you really prefer it if you could include the third member of your couple, your pet, in your plans? We’ve put together a suggested date night schedule that both humans and pets will enjoy, so that no one gets left out!

A few days before

If you’re buying a present for your parter, you should make sure you treat your pet to something special as well, as they’ve been such a good boy or girl. How about getting your rabbits or guinea pig some fun accessories for their run, like a shelter or some Zippi-tunnels? Dogs and cats will always appreciate a new, super comfy bed, like the super luxurious Omlet Bolster Bed.

16.00 Time Outside

Depending on what pet you have, the key to a good date night might be to tire them out a bit before you snuggle up inside. Rabbits and guinea pigs will love a run around in their tunnels in the garden, cats will enjoy some fresh air (either letting them hunt around the neighbourhood for an hour or so, or join them for some time on their cat run) and dogs will feel spoiled after a long hike or trip to the park to see some doggy friends. If you have a dog, why not stop off at a dog friendly pub for a drink and a small snack before you return home?

18.00 Play Time

This is a perfect opportunity to spend some quality time with your pet, doing what you know they love doing. If you have a smaller animal, you and your partner can create a maze or prepare a scavenger hunt for them, hiding snacks and building obstacles around the living room. Cats will enjoy chasing toys, and dogs will go crazy for some tug of war. If you want to spoil your pets even more, why not get them a new toy to play with?

19.00 Dinner Time

The key to the perfect date night is some good, and preferably rather indulgent, food. Maybe this is a good opportunity to try one of those recipes that requires a bit more time and effort? Or just to order some take away, if you’re knackered after all the playing. To fully include your pet, we would suggest making sure they also get to have something special for dinner. There are plenty of easy and healthy recipes for all pets online, so you can find something that you will enjoy making, and your pet will enjoy wolfing down. Divide the work and let your partner make something for the pets while you cook the human food, or the other way around.

20.00 Spa Treatment

Get settled on the sofa for a pampering session for pets and humans alike. Give your pet a bath and some grooming, like cutting their nails, brushing their fur and cleaning their teeth. While you enjoy a face mask or a manicure, dogs and cats might benefit from an oil treatment for dry skin and paw pads. Finish off the spa hour with a good long massage. Your pet will probably not be of much help here, so you humans might have to take it in turn.

While you’re treating yourselves, why not put on some relaxing music? Spotify has recently launched Spotify for Pets, customised lists based on your pet’s personality and your music taste. Unfortunately you’re limited to only a few pets at the moment, but what’s to say your rabbit won’t enjoy a cat playlist?

21.00 Film and Snacks

Pop some popcorn, pour some wine and curl up on the sofa together with your date(s) for some Petflix and Chill. Make sure your pet has a place where he or she can get settled and feel comfy, maybe on a special blanket or bed. Date night is all about a relaxing rom-com, or something else that both you can your pet will love napping in front of. Make sure that you offer your pet movie snacks and a nice drink as well, we have plenty of treats and goodies for all pets in our shop, including white and rosé Pawsecco for a true celebratory evening . As an added bonus, you currently get 25% off all treats in the Omlet shop!

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This entry was posted in Pets on February 9th, 2020 by linnearask


Do Pets Experience Heartbreak?

There is something very arrogant in assuming that only humans can experience deep emotions. We’ve all seen our pets excited and happy, and we also come to recognise when they’re sad. In other words, they experience feelings.

Sorrow in an animal is different from fear or anxiety. The latter things are brought on by stress, resulting from poor environment, poor diet, scary neighbours, cruel owners, or countless other factors that can make animals feel exposed or in danger.

Heartbreak, as any person who has experienced it knows, is something very different. It results from bereavement, or other forms of fundamental loss. Scientists are often eager to point out that we can never prove an animal feels these emotions. But many owners have seen it for themselves and have no doubt at all.

What Makes Dogs Sad?

A pet may become distressed if a certain person or a longstanding companion of the same species is no longer around – but only if that person or pet was one that the animal had completely bonded with.

A family dog will have a relationship with all the human members of its family, but there will usually be one favourite – an Alpha male or Alpha Female, if you like. Although the dog may miss the others, it is on this favourite, its main owner, that its affections will be focused.

If such a person leaves the household, for whatever reason, the dog’s first reaction will be one of separation anxiety. It will pine and lose its interest in things such as food, games and walks. Loss of appetite can lead to liver problems in a relatively short time, so keep an eye on the situation and be ready to turn to a vet for help.

The dog may also whine and cry more than usual, and may start to lick and chew household items, or its own fur or paws. Many grieving dogs find it hard sleeping, and will sit and whine by a door, or may simply go into hiding.

A lot depends on the breed, and on the individual animal too. But many dogs can certainly be classed as heartbroken in these situations. The grieving will last for several weeks, even months.

Time will cure the heartache, but in the meantime you can help by making sure the pet continues to have walks in its favourite places. If the dog enjoys staying in kennels, a short break there is a possibility too. You could also consider employing a dog walker, to give your pet a change of routine. Don’t be afraid to be more generous than usual with the snacks, treats and toys, too.

What Makes Cats Sad?

Cats can be harder to read than dogs. They will tend to lay low, hiding away more than usual. Some will become more vocal, mewing and crying for their lost friend. Many will lose their appetites, sleep less, and may even run away for days at a time.

Like dogs, a cat that stops eating can develop potentially fatal liver disease, so early intervention by a vet is recommended.

Many, however, soon transfer their main affections to another member of the household. Other, more independent cats seem to readjust without any problem.

What Makes Other Pets Sad?

Small mammals don’t appear to grieve when their owners disappear from their lives. But many will revert to a natural nervousness if they are no longer being handled and fed by their best friend. Someone else needs to step up and become the pet’s favourite.

Pet parrots who have bonded with a partner or owner are known to grieve the loss of a loved one, whether a fellow bird or a human. Loss of appetite and listlessness are the usual signs. Someone needs to keep up the contact and interaction, to ease these highly intelligent birds into their new lives.

The problem does not usually arise if the birds are kept in an open aviary setting. Smaller parrots such as budgies and lovebirds don’t seem to miss their human friends so intensely either, although they will certainly grieve if their feathered best friend disappears.

The Grieving Process

Above all, try to be upbeat and affectionate with the grieving animal. Pets pick up on our moods with an almost supernatural skill, so if we’re very sad, they may mirror our feelings. Again, this might be a good time to bring in friends or relatives more able to put on a happy face for the sake of the heartbroken pet.

Most pets will, with time, move on. Some older pets may never entirely recover. In all circumstances involving loss, all an owner can do is care for the animal as it readjusts to changed circumstances.

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This entry was posted in Cats on February 8th, 2020 by linnearask


25% off all treats for a limited time only!

We could probably all benefit from something special to make it through the last winter weeks, and your pets will definitely feel the same way!

Stock up and spoil your loved ones this February with 25% off all treats on the Omlet shop, and find the pawfect Valentine’s Day gift for your furry friends!

Use promo code PETFLIX at checkout to claim the offer.

Terms and conditions:
Promotion runs from 06/02/20 – midnight 17/02/20, while stocks last. For 25% off treats use promo code PETFLIX. 25% off is available on treats for all animals, excluding bags of feed over 1.5kg, as well as treat toys and Feldy High Energy Chicken Pecker Balls – Box of 40. Excludes out of stock items. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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This entry was posted in Offers and promotions on February 6th, 2020 by linnearask


Birds Who Mate For Life

According to folklore, birds choose their mates on St Valentine’s Day. A rare few only have to make that choice once, staying with the same partner for as long as both birds are alive.

There is something romantically appealing about this idea of birds sticking together for life. But not many species follow this lifestyle. The faithful few include many species of goose and swan, several of the owls and eagles, and some of the penguins. Many others are ‘serially monogamous’, meaning they stick with one partner throughout a single breeding season, but not for life. An estimated 90% of bird species fall into this category.

Mating for life is something much rarer. Parrots in captivity usually stick with one partner, as their choice of mates is limited. But the whole idea of bird fidelity is best captured in the image of two lovebirds cuddling up and rubbing beaks.

What’s the advantage in sticking together for life?

The chicks of birds of prey such as owls and eagles grow slowly. Rearing a big bird such as an osprey or golden eagle takes around three months from egg laying to independence. It helps save time if the parents start rearing their young early in the season, preferably in the same nest as last year. Lengthy courtship displays and nest-building are simply delays, and ones that can be avoided if two birds resume their old relationship each year.

The advantages of faithfulness may seem less obvious for smaller birds. But it ensures that both parent birds are focussed on the successful rearing of their chicks. The alternative is polygamy, in which the male strays away to mate with other birds, putting all the pressure on the hen bird to feed the chick. In a harsh season, having two parents working together can make the difference between life and death for the chicks.

Most mating-for-life species don’t actually live together outside the breeding season, though. Not in the wild, at least. But there is one famous exception – the Lovebird.

Lovebirds of a feather stick together

Lovebirds take mating-for-life very seriously. Most other ‘faithful’ birds rediscover their independence outside the breeding season, but Lovebirds live up to their name 24/7, 365 days a year.

Like most parrot species, in the wild all nine species of Lovebird live in flocks, and their social organisation is based on pairs. The strong bonds involved prevent bickering and fighting in the mating season. It’s a peace-keeping system that works so well, it’s surprising that other species haven’t followed a similar evolutionary path.

Lovebirds are bonded to the point of jealously. They may be our perfect picture of avian affection, but they will fend off any intruders. It is recommended to keep pairs separate from other birds, rather than including them in a mixed aviary – unless you have a huge space in which grumpy or jealous birds can easily find space away from each other.

A bereaved Lovebird, or one kept on its own, will become depressed. It will pine, stop eating, squawk, and become irritable. The exceptions are those birds that have been handled from a young age and have bonded with their human companion. Their affection is every bit as genuine with a human ‘partner’ as a feathered one.

There are downsides to this, though. A bonded lovebird will regurgitate food for you, and will need discouraging from attempting to mate!

Zebra Finches – Lovebirds of the Finch world

Most birds that live in flocks are monogamous – that is, they have just one mate each breeding season – but the Zebra finch takes it a step further. Many owners think the bird’s habit of mating for life is something that only happens in captivity, where choice of partner is restricted. But the little Zebra is every bit as faithful as the Lovebird, even in the wild.

In captivity problems can arise when birds die, or when new ones are added. A singleton in a group of Zebra finches will find it hard to find a mate without a fight. For this reason, ironically, it is actually best to keep these finches in pairs rather than big or odd-numbered flocks, as a single bird may be forced to become either a bully or a depressed outcast.

Love is in the air

Nature has found all sorts of ways of ensuring that the next generation of birds takes to the wing. At one end sit the cuckoos, taking no responsibility for parenting or relationships of any sort. Next come those birds that take the lots-of-mates approach. Most, however, opt for one partner per season.

But there’s something particularly appealing about those few species that mate for life. For Lovebird and Zebra finch owners, romance is an everyday fact of life.


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This entry was posted in Pets on February 6th, 2020 by linnearask