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Category Archives: Cats

End Of Summer Saver – £5 Off Omlet Cooling Mats

Provide your pet with the possibility to rest on a super cool and comfortable spot on those warm September days, or after a long and strenuous autumn walk! The Omlet Cooling Mat is self-cooling and has a memory foam layer that will enclose your pet’s body as they lie down on it, and you can choose to display either the classic cream coloured or the stylish grey side of the mat depending on your home and your pet!

Right now you get £5 off Omlet Cooling Mats for dogs or cats, but only for a limited time! Use promo code COOLOFF at checkout to claim this exclusive discount!

Terms and Conditions
Promotion of £5 off cooling mats runs from 03/09/20 – midnight 08/09/20. Use promo code COOLOFF at checkout. Includes Omlet Cooling Mat cats and dogs. All sizes are included. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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How to Litter Train a Cat

Photo by Paul Hanaoka on Unsplash

Most cats don’t need much persuading to use a litter tray. This makes training a straightforward process, and the key detail is the tray itself.

A litter tray needs to be large enough to accommodate your cat comfortably while it’s using the facilities. It also needs to be placed in a suitable spot. Cats feel vulnerable when they’re relieving themselves, and will not use a litter tray in a busy part of the house. A quiet corner is what they need – but it should be away from the feeding area, as cats, like humans, do not like their eating and toileting activities to be in the same space!

The cat litter itself is not usually an issue. All the available brands do the job. The advantage that shop-bought products have over plain sandy soil is that they are super-absorbent, and don’t stick to the cat’s feet. It is best to avoid perfumed or deodorizing litter, unless the additives are all natural. Chemical perfumes can cause allergic reactions in some cats.

Basic Litter Training

A young kitten with a weak bladder – or a stressed rescue cat – may take time to get the hang of litter trays, but it is rare for a cat to fail this basic training course!

  1. Make sure the tray is big enough. If in doubt, get the biggest one you can. This will accommodate the growing cat, and the tray will not seem ‘full’ after a couple of visits. If the cat thinks the litter is too soiled, it will not want to enter the tray.
  2. If your cat is particularly shy, a covered tray is the best option, as these give more sense of privacy.
  3. If you have more than one cat, it is recommended that you should have one tray per cat. This prevents problems if the pets fall out or decide they’re not going to poo where another cat has just pooed!
  4. Remove the solid waste from the tray each day, and thoroughly wash it – and replace the litter completely – at least once a week. If the tray starts to smell too unpleasant, the cat will be tempted to relieve itself elsewhere else.
  5. In the early days, timing is important. A kitten will usually need to relieve itself after playing and after eating. When a young kitten has finished eating, carry it to the litter tray. A few sniffs and a bit of litter-pawing will often stimulate the desired response. You can also play with your kitten next to the litter box, ready to lift her onto the tray when play has ended.
  6. Lead by example. Not by actually using the tray yourself, of course, but by pawing the litter with your finger. Don’t take the cat’s paw and force it to dig, though, as this can be stressful and may even lead to litter phobia, which is definitely not what you want.
  7. If accidents happen outside the litter tray, put the droppings in the tray as a prompt for the cat.
  8. Be patient, never shout at the cat if it’s taking a little time to get the hang of it, lavish praise and affection on a successful litter-visit, and once your pet knows what to do, just quietly leave her to it.

Litter Training Problems

If the cat is resistant to the idea of using the tray and continues to use other parts of the house as the toilet, one effective deterrent is to move the cat food bowl to the place where the accident happened. Cats do not like mixing and matching their food and toilet, so this should help her move on to the more appropriate facilities.

If the message is still not getting through, confining the cat to a spare room may do the trick. With the litter tray at one end and the food and water bowl at the other, it would be a very perverse cat indeed who did not get the message. It may sound a little like a prison, but as long as the room isn’t too hot or cold, the cat will feel secure. You can visit for playtimes too, of course, and the need for confinement will usually be over in a couple of days.

Cats that persistently refuse to use a litter tray may be stressed by something in their environment. This could be other cats, a dog, noisy children, or the simple fact that the tray is not in a suitable location. There are occasionally health-related issues that make a cat ‘miss’ the tray, too, so that’s worth checking out if you’re not making progress with the training.

Otherwise, litter training a cat is simplicity itself.

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What Is FIV and How Does It Affect My Cat?

Photos by Erik-Jan Leusink on Unsplash

What is FIV?

FIV, or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, is a viral infection that affects cats all over the world. It’s not in itself particularly dangerous, but steadily weakens the cat’s immune system, making them more susceptible to secondary infections. 

FIV can be found in 2.5-5% of all cats worldwide, but is less common in healthy, domesticated cats like our pets. 

How can my cat catch it?

FIV is spread through direct contact with an infected cat, most commonly through bites and wounds, which is why unneutered male cats prone to fighting for territory are over-represented among cases. Some evidence shows that mums can pass the infection onto their kittens, but it is rare. Infection through social grooming, sharing food and water bowls, and general close contact is very rare. 

FIV can’t be transmitted between species, so infected cats can live with humans and other pets, but should be kept in a single cat household to be on the safe side. 

How does it affect my cat and how do I spot it?

FIV starts with a short, normally relatively manageable illness that is not always noticed by the owner. After this the cats’ immune system will start to slowly deteriorate, but it can be years before it actually affects your cat in any way. 

Something that will make a vet react and test for the infection is a cat that seems to struggle to recover from minor infections and illnesses. The cat doesn’t necessarily need to be very ill, it’s more a question of how often he or she needs to see the vet, or if they seem to be constantly battling some kind of health issue. 

FIV positive cats are more susceptible to certain types of tumours, serious respiratory infections, skin diseases and mouth inflammations. That being said, research shows that infected cats have a similar life expectancy to healthy cats, and will in most cases be able to live a long and happy life if kept inside and looked after by a caring owner. 

Can FIV be cured? 

The simple answer is no, there is no cure for FIV, but as it’s secondary diseases and infections that mainly affect the cat, there are in most cases treatments, and there is no reason that a FIV positive cat won’t make a great pet for years to come. 

A vaccine against FIV has been developed, but its efficiency has been questioned, and it’s currently only being used in some places in America. 

What can I do if my cat is infected? 

As FIV is spread through direct contact with other cats, it’s very important that infected cats are kept indoors. Not only does this stop the cat from passing on the disease to other felines, but also reduces the risks of catching secondary infections that due to their weakened immune system can make them very ill.

If you have a cat with confirmed FIV that can’t be let outside, they will still greatly benefit from some fresh air. The Omlet Outdoor Cat Run makes it possible for your cat to be outside and interact with the world around them, without the risk of running into any other cats. Decorate the run with some toys and a climbing post and let your cat play while you potter around the garden, or put a chair inside and take the opportunity to spend some quality time with your pet in the sunshine. 

Other things you can do to help your cat is to take him or her for regular check ups, and to contact your vet as soon as you notice any changes, even if minor, in your cat’s health or behaviour. Also make sure to give a nutritious and well-balanced diet. Raw food diets are not recommended for FIV positive cats as uncooked meat and eggs can be dangerous to cats with a compromised immune system.

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Why Are Some People Allergic To Cats?

Allergy to cats is the most commonly seen of all pet allergies, almost twice as common as the dog equivalent. It’s estimated that up to 3 out of 10 people have some level of reaction to felines, but to what extent it limits peoples’ ability to spend time with cats varies greatly. 

Common symptoms of cat allergy include one or several of the following symptoms after having been around a cat, or having spent time in a house where cats live:

  • Coughing and wheezing
  • Itchy and blotchy rash on the chest and face
  • Red and itchy eyes
  • Sneezing

More extreme allergic reactions are shortness of breath, severe swelling, and in bad cases anaphylactic shock. If the allergy is present but not as prominent people might at first be absolutely fine around cats, but over time experience neverending fatigue and a constant sore throat.

What causes these symptoms?

Opposite to many people’s belief, it’s not actually hair that causes pet allergies, but a protein produced in oil glands on the skin, and is found in cat saliva, urine and dander (dried flakes of skin often found on cat hair). This protein is called Fel d. The World Health Organisation recognises 8 different allergens, Fel d 1-8, and out of these, Fel d 1 accounts for 60-90% of allergic reactions. Its exact biological function is still unknown, but it sure knows how to annoy humans! 

People with allergies have an oversensitive immune system that mistakes harmless things, like a cat protein, for dangerous invaders and sends out a strong attack to destroy these invaders. The symptoms allergic people feel are side effects of the body’s defence against the allergen. 

What is there to do?

Male cats produce higher levels of Fel d 1 than females and neutered males. The difference is however relatively small, so if you’re struggling it probably won’t matter that much. 

The same goes for so-called hypo-allergenic cat breeds. While they do work for some allergic cat lovers, they still produce Fel d 1. So if you have severe reactions to some cats, getting one that produces less dander won’t make it possible for you to live with one. The only thing you can do is to spend time with the breed you’re potentially planning to buy or adopt beforehand and see how you get on. 

Antihistamines can be a help to some allergic people; if taken regularly they minimise symptoms and make it possible to spend time in a house where a cat has been. They are normally best taken preventatively, making sure the body is prepared should it come across any triggering allergens. It’s however not recommended to depend on antihistamines on a daily basis to make it possible for you to get a cat. Even if it’s sad, you might have to come to terms with your allergy and that cat ownership might not be possible at the moment. 

Finally, it’s worth noting that you can develop cat allergies at any time of your life, even if you’ve never shown any signs before. Allergies are not hereditary as such, but the tendency to develop allergies is sometimes passed down from parents to their children. This means that if you’re allergic to cats, it is more likely that your child will develop an allergy to something. It won’t necessarily be to cats as well, but as it’s one of the more common allergies it’s worth letting your child spend time with other peoples’ cats before getting one yourself. 

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10 Cat Hacks All Cat Owners Should Know

1.

If you have problems with your cat eating their food too quickly, try changing their food bowl to a larger, shallow plate. This will slow them down significantly as they have to take smaller mouthfuls, which minimises the risk of the food coming back up again. 

2.

If you’re worried your cat doesn’t drink enough water, try putting the water bowl in a different spot to where they get fed. In the wild, cats will not drink at the same place as they eat to avoid the meat contaminating the water, and this behaviour lives on with some pet cats.

3.

Does your cat rub against your laptop or try to sit on the keyboard as you’re trying to work from home? Bring out the best cat toy of all time, the cardboard box! Place a box on your desk and most cats will forget about you and happily play or curl up in the box.

4.

Try freezing some of the treats you give to your cat. The unusual texture and temperature of the treat will stimulate several of the cat’s senses and encourage explorative play. This is especially good in summer when the cat will love the cooling effect even more.

5.

If you want to keep your cat off the kitchen counter, a new sofa or an expensive side table, put some double sided tape over the surface where the cat’s sharp claws would cause damage. Cats hate the feeling of the sticky tape, and will quickly learn to avoid these spots. At that point you can remove the tape. 

6.

The best way to avoid cat hair all over the house is to get on top of grooming and brush your cat regularly, preferably daily. It doesn’t only decrease unwanted shedding, it also helps the cat groom itself and prevents matted fur and hairballs. Get a brush that suits your cat’s type of hair and make it a lovely time of the day together with your cat. 

7.

For fur that has gathered on rugs and upholstery, put on a rubber glove and run your hand over the surface to gather up pet hair. Shower squeegees can also be useful for this task!

8.

Potted plants sometimes become alternative litter boxes, which is neither nice nor very good for the plant. To stop your cat from going in the pot, cover the soil with a layer of pine cones. These blend in nicely, but will put your feline friend off. 

9.

One of the best ways of stimulating an indoor cat is to give them a place to climb. If you haven’t got enough space for a large climbing station, put up some shelves that the cat can explore. 

10.

No matter how much you groom your cat and make sure the house is nice and clean, the cat’s bed will still be exposed to a lot of hair and dirt. Make sure you get a cat bed with a machine washable cover that can be cleaned over and over again without fading or weakening. The Omlet Bolster Beds with a super comfortable memory foam mattress are a perfect solution for all cat owners. 

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When is the Best Time to get a Cat?

There is only one universal rule when it comes to good timing with a new cat. Avoid introducing the furry newcomer when there’s a big party taking place, or at a time of year associated with fireworks.

Unfortunately, this one rule is often ignored. Big parties tend to take place at Christmas and birthdays. And when do people usually receive presents, including, possibly, new cats and kittens? Exactly…

The problem is that celebrations involve lots of noise and lots of people, and a cat introduced into this environment is likely to run for cover and stay in hiding for as long as possible. It can take a nervous animal several days to recover from party trauma.

The Best Feline Times

  • It is far better to introduce the newcomer when all is quiet on the domestic front. That way, the cat gets an early taste of how everyday life will be with you and your loved ones.
  • If the new cat is a birthday or Christmas present for a child, explain to them why the kitten is arriving a day or two ‘late’. The party day itself can then be a time to make the home cat-friendly. Install the scratching post, cat bed, cat flap and litter tray. Stock up on cat food and treats, and get lots of cat toys ready to go. These can all act as surrogate birthday or Christmas presents, paving the way for the new furry arrival a day or two later. Preparing your home in this way is necessary anyway, with or without the excuse of a birthday party.
  • Homes need to be cat-proofed too, with toxic house plants and vulnerable ornaments removed.
  • The new cat arrival date should be delayed until the person looking after the pet has enough time to do just that. Cats are independent animals, once they settle in, but in the early days you need to offer reassurance, a comfortable lap, and a few sessions of litter-tray training. An older cat may have been toilet trained already, but a kitten will take a while to grasp the idea.
  • If the cat is going to be spending time outdoors, it’s a good idea to bring it home when it’s not too cold outside. Although good weather can never be guaranteed, the summer months have a better chance of delivering dry and sunny conditions. The cat won’t be harmed by wind, rain or snow, but if the weather is very bad, the wet pet might decide to head for shelter away from home. If it has not been a household pet for long, it may decide to take up residence in this new abode, and tracking it down won’t always be easy.

Life Stages

  • The elderly: It’s a melancholy thought, but many cats outlive their owners. This is not a reason to avoid getting a new cat if you are elderly, but all owners should digest the fact that a cat will live 15, even 20 years, and if basic cat care is going to be an issue, it needs to be discussed. If there is someone who can help out with cat food shopping and litter tray cleaning, even if the cat owner is no longer able to carry out these tasks easily, that solves the problem. Cats are, indeed, a health asset for the elderly, with scientific research suggesting that they are greatly beneficial to mental health and happiness.
  • Infants: At the other end of the age scale, it’s recommended to avoid bringing a new cat home if there is a baby in the house. Although incredibly rare, there have been tragic stories of babies accidentally suffocated by cats. A far commoner issue is allergies – some children can develop symptoms such as asthma and skin rashes in the proximity of cats and dogs, and until you know your child is allergy-free, it is best to avoid taking the risk. And even if a child is allergic to cats, there are hypoallergenic breeds – including the Abyssinian, the Cornish Rex and the Bengal – that do not provoke the allergic reactions.
  • Children: If the new cat is for a child, it is important that there is someone else who is willing to put in some cat-care hours too. No child under the age of 12 should be given full responsibility for a cat – or indeed any pet.
  • The Inbetweenies: Between childhood and old age, there is a time when many of us plan making a new start in new jobs and new homes. If you know this kind of change is imminent, it’s best to delay getting a new cat. Acclimatising them to a new home, and then another new home soon after, is not ideal, and the cat might leave the second home in search of the first one…

So, if you’re looking for a general rule here, it’s this: You can bring a new cat home any time – as long as it’s the right time!

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Spoil Your Pet With Their Own Sofa Today – Now £20 Off

Reduce drafts, dirt and disturbances to improve your pet’s quality of sleep by raising their bed off the ground with the stylish Fido and Maya Sofa Frames. At the moment you get £20 off all Sofa Frames, so it’s the perfect opportunity to spoil your pet with their very own sofa!

Terms and Conditions
Promotion of £20 off sofa frames runs from 18/06/20 – midnight 23/06/20. No promo code needed, discount has already been applied. Includes Fido Dog Sofa Frame Small, Fido Dog Sofa Frame Medium, Maya Cat Sofa Frame Small and Maya Cat Sofa Frame Medium. Excludes beds without sofa frame. Subject to availability. Omlet ltd. reserves the right to withdraw the offer at any point. Offer cannot be used on delivery, existing discounts or in conjunction with any other offer.

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Cat Tail Facts

A cat’s signature move is the slinky walk with an upright tail. Intriguingly, no other cat species walks like this, and it is not known exactly when pet cats first adopted the posture.

The domestic cat’s ancestor, the African wildcat, hooked up with humans more than 10,000 years ago. They probably adopted us, rather than the other way round, attracted by the surplus of rodents nibbling away at our grain stores. It seems pretty certain that the feline freeloaders soon adapted their body language – tails included – just to please us, quickly securing their place on the sofa.

The following cat-of-nine-tails facts tell you everything you need to know about your pet cat’s swishing tail.

1 – Balancing Act 

Cats have fantastic balance. Their tails play a major role in this skill, acting as a counterweight when puss is ‘tightrope walking’ on narrow walls or ledges. The tail also helps cats run and change direction with great agility – and without stumbling. Next time you get the chance, watch a cat run and turn – if a human took some of those feline twists and turns at a similar pace, they would simply fall over.

2 – Tails Tell Tales

 Cats communicate with their tails, sending out subtle signals. The most familiar signal is the upright tail, a sign of a happy cat. In moments of great pleasure, the upright tail will quiver at the tip. This is not to be confused with the twitching tail of a resting cat, which means she’s irritated. Once the cat is on her feet and the tail is swinging from side to side, she’s switched from annoyance to anger, so watch out!

3 – Let us Prey

When they’re stalking prey, cats tend to keep their tails low and still, but they may still flick and twitch in excitement as the moment of pouncing draws near. If the hunt is unsuccessful, the tail will twitch restlessly in irritation.

4 – No Tail to Tell 

Some breeds, including the Manx, are born without tails, due to a dominant gene. Two tailless Manx cats should never be allowed to breed, however, as a combination of the two dominant genes brings severe health problems to the kittens. The curly tail of the Bobtail breeds doesn’t come with the same potential health problems as the Manx cat gene. Both the Manx and the Bobtails seem to have learnt to balance pretty well without a classic cat tail.

5 – When the Tail Goes Cold

A cat that has lost its tail in an accident, or has injured it in a door or traffic accident, is definitely handicapped. It will not be able to balance as well as before or send out those tail-twitching signals. It is still capable of leading happy life, though – owners just have to look for other body language details to read their pet’s mood.

6 – Inside Story 

Cat’s tails have between 19 and 23 vertebrae, depending on the breed (and not counting the tailless Manx!) This represents around 10% of the total number of bones in the cat’s body. These vertebrae give the tail its whiplash flexibility, held together with complex muscles, tendons and ligaments.

7 – Ailing Tails 

If your cat is feeling unwell, you can usually see the signs in its tail. It won’t be held upright or twitching excitedly like before. If you notice that the behaviour of your pet’s tail has changed, take it as a sign that she needs a health check. Some cats are prone to dermatitis, sometimes brought on by fleas. This can often be seen in inflamed areas in the region where the tail joins the rump. Some hormonal problems can result in inflammation in the tail too.

8 – Upstanding Felines

The ability to walk with an upright tail is actually unique to domestic cats. All other members of the cat family walk with the tail down, horizontal, or tucked safely between the legs.

9 – Tail End

Cats raise their tails to tell us they’re happy and relaxed, but when prowling amongst other cats the raised tail signal is an invite to come and investigate. Other cats will sniff a cat whose tail is in the air.

It is widely thought that purring is something cats invented just for us – and perhaps that upright happy tail is another one of the ways they won a place in our hearts and homes.

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Why Fresh Air is so Beneficial to Cats

Watch a cat stalking through the grass or simply relaxing in the sunshine, and it’s clear that they love being outside. If you live in the countryside, this isn’t much of an issue, and all country cats mix and match the great outdoors and the great indoors. In towns, however, owners may be less keen to let their cat spend a night on the tiles.

Town cats have shorter lifespans than country cats, on average. This is not due to the benefits of fresh air – it’s simply because most premature deaths in the cat population are caused by road accidents, and a town the cat has far more chances of quickly shedding its nine lives.

Why do cats like being outdoors?

Do you like spending time in the sunshine, with the fresh air in your lungs and a gentle breeze on your face? Cats are exactly the same. Like you, they get a buzz from life beyond the four walls. They are stimulated by movement, sounds and scents, and even the humblest garden has these in abundance. Cats will investigate whatever the world has to offer, and this gives them both mental and physical stimulation, a combination that results in a happy and healthy cat.

Research has shown that certain sounds, including the squeaks of rodents and the twittering of birds, is particularly stimulating for cats. They find these things satisfying and engaging on an instinctive level, and all animals need to keep their instincts happy.

If given the chance, cats will make full use of the possibilities of life in the fresh air – not just the immediate vicinity, but the much wider local area, sometimes prowling a territory with a radius of one mile from their home. They will form all kinds of relationships in this territory, some friendly and some not, but all part of the rich tapestry of cat life.

What this means is that access to the outdoors is a great stress reliever, giving a cat many of the things it needs in order to stay alert and content, and to allow it to chill in its natural habitat.

However, owners who want to keep their pets indoors should not be put off by this. They can still provide their pet with most of the benefits of the outdoor life.

How to bring the outdoors indoors

Breed – and therefore personality – plays a big part in a cat’s contentment. Some breeds – including the Burmese, the Siamese, the Korat, the Oriental and the Abyssinian – need the outdoors in the same way as a piano player needs a piano, and they will not be happy if denied access to nature. Others – including the Persian, the Russian Blue and the Ragdoll – seem to have been bred for a life on the sofa, and will not miss being outdoors one little bit. Most crossbreed cats like to enjoy the best of both worlds, so if your cat is going to live indoors, you will need to make the domestic space a bit more ‘wild’.

Providing stimulation with toys, including ones filled with catnip, is half the battle. You should also open your windows wide enough to let the fresh air and the scents and sounds indoors, without giving an escape route for the cat. Failing that, opening the door to the garden while closing off the inner doors will allow the fresh air to circulate.

If space allows, a cat run is a great option. This can be linked to the house via a cat flap on the door, allowing your pet to spend as much time outdoors as it wants. If the cat run is not connected to the house, you can let the cat spend time on the run while you’re out in the garden as well. Or, if you start early, you may be able to train your cat to walk on a lead. This needs careful planning, though, as avoiding dogs out on their walks is an important detail!

Even if you live in a flat it’s possible to allow your cat some fresh air, providing you have a balcony. Omlet’s Cat Balcony Enclosure fits most balconies, and will give your cat a safe space to feel the wind in their fur.

The main takeaways from this are that cats need fresh air, and all the things it represents. But at the same time, town cats who are happy with a life on the sofa can enjoy most of the fun and stimulation of the outdoors by staying indoors.

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Learn To Read Your Cat’s Body Language

The closest ancestors of the domestic cats were solitary wildcat species that didn’t have to, and in most cases didn’t want to, draw attention to how they were feeling. Showing weakness would potentially expose you as an easier target for predators or competing cats. This is still present in cats today; in most cases they will try to hide what they are feeling from you.

With that being said, they do of course communicate. With other felines, and with us. They use scents and vocalisations, but also a lot of visual cues in the form of body language. 

When you’re trying to analyse and understand your cat’s body language it’s important to use the context of the whole situation rather than just looking at one thing. Check the surroundings and try to work out what factors might affect your cat. Is there anything that might make the cat stressed, angry or worried? This might make it easier to understand the cat’s, not always crystal clear, signals. 

There are five things to focus on when trying to read your cat’s body language. Eyes, ears, face, body and tail!

EYES 

  • Slow blinking – Eyes that blink slowly or are half closed indicate that your cat is really relaxed and trusts that the situation is not threatening. Try blinking back in the same slow way to mimic the cat’s behaviour. This is a great bonding exercise for the two of you.
  • Dilated pupils – Given it’s not extremely dark in the room, large pupils indicate that your cat is feeling surprised, or scared and anxious. Normally the eyes will also be open wide, and the cat will not blink.
  • Constricted pupils – If the pupils on the other hand are very small and constricted, your cat will most likely feel tense, possibly bordering on aggressive.
  • Staring – If your pet locks their eyes on something or something, it is likely to be a challenge. If it’s you the cat is staring at – best not to approach!

EARS

  • Pointing slightly up and forward – A content and relaxed cat will keep its ears held upright and pointing forward. This is the default ear position, and the ears will probably move somewhat as the cat follows familiar sounds in the room.
  • Pointing straight up – This is a sign of a cat who is alert and ready to go. They might have heard something they want to investigate, but will first listen out a bit longer.
  • Pointing in different directions – If one ear is angled to the side and the other one points backwards it is possible that the cat is nervous and trying to assess the situation to get as much information as possible. 
  • Pointing back, lying flat against the head – This is a sign of an annoyed, angry and potentially aggressive cat who is ready to pounce. It’s best to leave them alone. 

FACE

  • A relaxed and happy cat will have relaxed whiskers pointing going out from the face. Many cats also have a relaxed facial expression that resembles a smile.
  • An anxious or scared cat will pull its whiskers back along the side of the face to take up as little space as possible and not seem like a threat. Or if they are on high alert, the whiskers will point forwards. 
  • If the whiskers stand erect pointing away from the face, or forwards, it’s a sign that the cat is angry. He or she might show their teeth and hiss or growl.

BODY 

  • The neutral body stance for a cat is relaxed and even, with no tension. If they are lying down, they will be stretched out or curled up into a ball with their paws tucked in under the body. Often this might be followed by purring, a sign that the cat is content and relaxed.
  • An anxious or scared cat will in most cases just run away and hide somewhere away from what is frightening them, but if it’s not possible they will crouch very still on the ground with their head held low. 
  • An angry cat will try to make itself look as big as possible, with the fur pointing away from the body, straightened front legs and an arched back. 
  • It’s worth noting that a cat that’s lying on its back might not want a belly rub. Just as dogs they are trying to show submission, but would in most cases prefer just to be left alone.

TAIL

  • Held upright – This is a sign of a happy cat that wants attention and company. The tail can also be relaxed, but normally doesn’t move.
  • Held straight down – This should be a sign that the cat is scared or upset. A scared cat can also hold its tail under its body. 
  • Wagging – A wagging tail does not mean the same for cats as it does for dogs. If the tail is moving quickly from side to side, the cat is likely annoyed and would like to be left alone. If the cat instead wags the tail slowly, they are trying to assess the situation and deciding what to do. The cat might be a bit worried, so if you can, try to reassure him or her. 
  • Big, bushy tail held out straight from the body – Do not approach! This is an angry cat that is trying to look as scary as possible to potential threats. 

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Why Do Some People Dislike Cats So Much?

We’ve all been asked the age-old question at some point in our lives… “Are you a cat person, or a dog person?”

For those who reply “cat person” you will likely have had the confusing but unsurprising reply of “No way! I HATE cats!”

But why? So many people have strong feelings against cats, and most of the time can’t even justify their negativity. While some reasons can be understandable, others are just plain unreasonable! Here are a few reasons why our feline friends gained so many haters…

Myths and history

If we look back into Ancient Egyptian history, we will see that cats were considered magical beings, protectors and a sign of good luck by the Egyptians, and they even worshipped a Cat Goddess, named Bastet. 

So how have we become a world completely split over whether cats are good or bad? 

Throughout history, other countries have had mixed thoughts on the symbolism of cats. The main myth that has been carried through to the present day is most damaging to the reputation of the black cat. Some say if a black cat crosses your path you will have bad luck, others believe black cats are actually witches in disguise. Despite neither of these conspiracies holding any weight in truth, they still impact black cat adoption rates to this day, and may go somehow in explaining why so many people feel uneasy around cats of any colour.

Bad experiences

A common reason for the hate towards cats is related back to bad experiences that may have happened as early as childhood. It normally follows a story of visiting a family or friends house as a kid, and being swiped, bit, scratched or hissed at by the resident cat, with rarely any mention of what the disrespectful child-self may have done to provoke said cat.

Some people fear dogs for the same reason too so it definitely isn’t the main cause of hostility. We can only hope that someday these people may come around to the fact that it is very rare for a cat to attack for no reason, as an adult you are going to be better at reading the signals of a cat who would like some space.

Independent creatures

Yes, okay, sometimes cats aren’t as affectionate as dogs but this is because they are typically more independent. However, the notion suggested by some cat-haters that cats aren’t capable of loving their owners at all, is just plain silly. 

Some cats who have bad experiences with humans, may be more wary or even fearful of us, and will likely have got used to their own company and learnt to fend for themselves. But even the most frightened and isolated cats learn to enjoy human company again, after lots of love, care and affection.

There are lots of fascinating ways that cats show they love their owners and you can read all about those here.

Neighbour’s cat

If your neighbour’s cat is causing a mess in your garden or terrorising your chickens, it is understandable that some anger may develop towards the whole species. However, that behaviour is not a reflection on all cats, so don’t paint them all with the same brush!

You might, however, like to place the responsibility on the cats’ owners and suggest solutions to prevent upsetting neighbours, such as an outdoor pet enclosure for cats to spend time outdoors without getting up to mischief. Some people even walk their cats on a lead when they are new to an area to show them where they can go – whether this works or not is debatable.

“Dogs are cuter”

Some people are just die hard dog fans and we have to accept that, but the argument of which pet is “cuter” is entirely subjective and shouldn’t be taken as truth. If you think cats are cuter, then good for you! Cats should have as much chance as any other pet in finding a happy and loving home for life, and if you give them everything they need to be safe and content, they will love you right back.

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Why Do Cats Need a Scratching Post?

When a cat scratches a wall or post, it’s a sign that strong winds are about to rattle the rafters. If the cat scratches the legs of your table, it means a change in the weather. According to old British folklore, that is…

In reality, cats scratch for personal reasons – not to alert you to things your weather app may have missed! But the folklore underlines something very true – the fact that cats will happily run their claws up and down your household treasures. That’s why a tailor-made scratching post is a must for all pet cats.

There’s no doubt that cats enjoy the sensation of scratching. But there are two practical reasons for the behaviour. Cats trim their nails by clawing against hard or rough surfaces, so a scratching post is a kind of manicure station. Scratching also lets them have a good, general body stretch.

Cats also have scent glands in their paws (to match the ones on their cheeks – that’s what they’re up to when they brush against your legs). When scratching, they are also scent-marking, to tell the world that this particular territory belongs to them.

It’s not just domestic cats that do this. Tigers, for example, scent-mark trees, gouging them with their enormous claws as they do so.

Learning From Scratch

Pet cats that spend a lot of time outdoors will not scratch as much in the home. Their nails will be kept in good shape the natural way as the animal roams its wider territory. Cats will also, like tigers, take advantage of trees and other natural scratching stations.

If your cat spends little time outdoors, the urge for indoor scratching will be strong. You can reinforce desirable scratching behaviour by showering the cat with praise and affection when it uses the scratching post, and gently discouraging it if it tries to get its claws up close and personal to the furniture. It’s important not to simply cuddle the cat to stop it clawing, as your pet may interpret this as attention. The assumption “My Claws + Your Furniture = Quality Time With You” is one you need to discourage.

Cat Scratch Posts – Feline Groovy

A persistent furniture- or curtain-scratcher will need to break the habit. Covering the cat’s favourite table leg, sofa arm, etc., with kitchen foil, double-sided sticky tape or shiny plastic sheeting usually does the trick. The cat doesn’t like the feel of its claws on these surfaces.

Odours can deter persistent scratchers too. Citrus and menthol are two scents that most moggies will keep away from.

Another trick is to buy (or make) a scratching post and place it next to the piece of furniture the cat has been scratching. A sprinkle of catnip will make the new scratch post irresistible. Once the cat has engaged, the post can be moved somewhere more convenient.

It’s important that the scratching post is appealing to your pet. It will need a wide, heavy base to prevent it from wobbling or falling over during clawing, and should be tall enough to accommodate your cat at full stretch – between 60cm and 90cm. Make sure the material attached to the post has vertical grooves, rather than horizontal. Corrugated fibre boards work well, or materials with a vertical weave. This will ease the scratching process, and also minimise the chance of a claw snagging in the material (something to be aware of if you’re making your own post).

A scratching mat is another option, although many cats seem to prefer stretching upwards to scratch. This may be something to do with getting their scent spread at optimal height for feline passers-by to sniff at.

Identifying the Claws of Stress

Cats sometimes claw when they’re stressed, and that’s when your furniture is in real danger from cat-scratch-fever. Identifying the source of stress is important. It could be another cat, another pet (usually a dog), or even a child in the house whose rough handling has freaked out the poor puss. On the other hand it could be a noisy household appliance, or some regular noise from outside the home, such as aircraft or hyperactive car alarms.

As far as possible, remove or minimise the source of stress. Provide a second scratch post too. If you have more than one cat, it’s a good idea to give them each a separate post to call their own.

And just out of interest, next time your cat has a prolonged scratch at its post, take a look outside. Is it getting windier? Is the weather on the change? After all, those weather apps don’t get it right every time.


Are you looking for a new scratching post for your feline friend? We currently have an amazing offer on the Igloo Cat Scratching posts. This sturdy scratching post is attached to a soft square fabric base and is suitable for use by all types of cat. By combining it with the innovative Grooming Mat you can create a neat 2-in-1 scratcher and grooming device for your cat, making sure your furniture stays clear from fur, dander and sharp claws while also giving your cat an opportunity to stretch and mark their territory.

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Why Do Some Animals Have Paws?

Have you ever looked at your pets’ paws and wondered why? Why don’t they have hands and fingers like us? The answer dates back thousands of years and is the result of our pets’ ancestors adapting to the independent and wild lives they once lived in an environment which was very different to your safe, warm home. 

The History of the Paw

Before our pets were domesticated, they had to defend themselves to stay alive while hunting for their own food. Many of the traits that helped them do that haven’t changed, staying with the species’ throughout evolution. This includes the paw

Dogs and cats are the main paw-ed animals that may come to mind. But before we had house cats and dogs, there were generations of wild cats and wolves. The purpose of the paw is largely related to sound and shock absorption. The fatty tissue inside the pads helps animals jump and land without pain or noise, especially helpful for silently hunting prey in the wild while protecting limbs from impact. 

A dog's paw pad

The paw pads are also much rougher when the animal is subject to extreme surfaces day in, day out. This assists with grip in treacherous or slippery conditions, working in a similar way to human shoes. For our domestic pets, the paw pads are often much smoother as conditions are easier underfoot. Some dog breeds still have webbed feet to help them swim, an adaptation that wolves passed on and still benefit from.

While paws are well adapted for walking and jumping around, debris can sometimes get stuck in the paw pads and cause pain. If you spot your pet chewing at their paw or limping and lifting it off the ground, carefully check their paw pad for any stones or splinters that may need removing. If your rabbit or guinea pigs paws look sore it could be a sign that their bedding is too scratchy. 

What can the paw tell us?

Did you know, that some animals use their paw pads to keep cool and release sweat? So damp paw prints could mean your pet needs some help cooling down.

Pet’s paws can sometimes tell us a little bit about how they are feeling, too. For example, cats will knead blankets, beds, pillows and even humans with their paws when they are feeling happy and content. There’s lots of reasons why this may be; it might remind them of nursing from their Mother, they could be trying to create a cosy spot to sleep, or they could be using the scent glands in their paw pads to mark their territory. 

Have you also noticed your cat doesn’t like their paws to be touched? This is because the pads are extremely sensitive to touch, but some cats can be trained to tolerate their paws being touched, often easier if done from a young age, so if your cat does let you touch their paws it could be a sign of trust. 

More info here and here.

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Do Pets Experience Heartbreak?

There is something very arrogant in assuming that only humans can experience deep emotions. We’ve all seen our pets excited and happy, and we also come to recognise when they’re sad. In other words, they experience feelings.

Sorrow in an animal is different from fear or anxiety. The latter things are brought on by stress, resulting from poor environment, poor diet, scary neighbours, cruel owners, or countless other factors that can make animals feel exposed or in danger.

Heartbreak, as any person who has experienced it knows, is something very different. It results from bereavement, or other forms of fundamental loss. Scientists are often eager to point out that we can never prove an animal feels these emotions. But many owners have seen it for themselves and have no doubt at all.

What Makes Dogs Sad?

A pet may become distressed if a certain person or a longstanding companion of the same species is no longer around – but only if that person or pet was one that the animal had completely bonded with.

A family dog will have a relationship with all the human members of its family, but there will usually be one favourite – an Alpha male or Alpha Female, if you like. Although the dog may miss the others, it is on this favourite, its main owner, that its affections will be focused.

If such a person leaves the household, for whatever reason, the dog’s first reaction will be one of separation anxiety. It will pine and lose its interest in things such as food, games and walks. Loss of appetite can lead to liver problems in a relatively short time, so keep an eye on the situation and be ready to turn to a vet for help.

The dog may also whine and cry more than usual, and may start to lick and chew household items, or its own fur or paws. Many grieving dogs find it hard sleeping, and will sit and whine by a door, or may simply go into hiding.

A lot depends on the breed, and on the individual animal too. But many dogs can certainly be classed as heartbroken in these situations. The grieving will last for several weeks, even months.

Time will cure the heartache, but in the meantime you can help by making sure the pet continues to have walks in its favourite places. If the dog enjoys staying in kennels, a short break there is a possibility too. You could also consider employing a dog walker, to give your pet a change of routine. Don’t be afraid to be more generous than usual with the snacks, treats and toys, too.

What Makes Cats Sad?

Cats can be harder to read than dogs. They will tend to lay low, hiding away more than usual. Some will become more vocal, mewing and crying for their lost friend. Many will lose their appetites, sleep less, and may even run away for days at a time.

Like dogs, a cat that stops eating can develop potentially fatal liver disease, so early intervention by a vet is recommended.

Many, however, soon transfer their main affections to another member of the household. Other, more independent cats seem to readjust without any problem.

What Makes Other Pets Sad?

Small mammals don’t appear to grieve when their owners disappear from their lives. But many will revert to a natural nervousness if they are no longer being handled and fed by their best friend. Someone else needs to step up and become the pet’s favourite.

Pet parrots who have bonded with a partner or owner are known to grieve the loss of a loved one, whether a fellow bird or a human. Loss of appetite and listlessness are the usual signs. Someone needs to keep up the contact and interaction, to ease these highly intelligent birds into their new lives.

The problem does not usually arise if the birds are kept in an open aviary setting. Smaller parrots such as budgies and lovebirds don’t seem to miss their human friends so intensely either, although they will certainly grieve if their feathered best friend disappears.

The Grieving Process

Above all, try to be upbeat and affectionate with the grieving animal. Pets pick up on our moods with an almost supernatural skill, so if we’re very sad, they may mirror our feelings. Again, this might be a good time to bring in friends or relatives more able to put on a happy face for the sake of the heartbroken pet.

Most pets will, with time, move on. Some older pets may never entirely recover. In all circumstances involving loss, all an owner can do is care for the animal as it readjusts to changed circumstances.

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Top DIY Ideas To Upgrade Your Cat Run

One of the great things about the Omlet Outdoor Cat Run is how extremely versatile it is. The run in itself can be modified to fit the space you’ve got and the need of your cats, but it doesn’t stop there! We constantly see creative and and fun ways of using the run, and we thought we might share some that could inspire you, whether you’re getting a run for the first time, or are just looking for ways to getting the run ready for spring! 


DECORATIONS

When it comes to decorating the cat run there are practically no limits. Allow your cats to do all the things like like on the run, whether it is climbing, playing, running, scratching, hiding, or just lounging in a hammock. You can make the run even more practical with run covers that allow you cat enjoy the run in all weathers, or a chair for you to sit on while you’re spending time with your furbabies. We also love all the (catfriendly) flowers and plants that customers add to the run to make it blend in to the garden even more!


CONNECT IT TO THE HOUSE

The cat run comes with four walls, but is robust enough to be stable with only three of them. If you manage to find a way to secure the open end to the house, this is a way of allowing the cats to move between inside and outside at their own will. This amazing set up is from a customer in Denmark, with a special kitty entrance from the basement into the run in the garden, where by the looks of things both humans and felines will enjoy spending time. By combining clear and heavy duty covers they have also made sure the cats are safe from both rain and sun while out on the run.


WORK WITH WHAT YOU’VE GOT

This German customer decided to build their run around a small tree in the garden. This way you get around most of the decorating of the run, as the tree will act as both a climbing post, and provide shade during sunny days. Ideal!


RUN ON WHEELS

The modular design of the cat run does mean that it’s possible to move it whenever needed. If you just want to shift it to a different spot in the garden you can invite some neighbours around and lift the whole run, and if you’re moving house or want to use the space for something else for a while, you can take it down and pack it up into pieces that are easy to store, ready for when it’s next needed.

However, this French customer didn’t think either of these solutions were good enough, and decided to build a platform with wheels, so that the run can be pushed around on the patio to find the perfect sun/shade ratio, or have the cat either relaxing in a corner away from the hustle and bustle, or close to the house for a more sociable time in the fresh air.

A DIY specialist will be able to help you find what you need for this. Our advice would be to make sure you fasten the run on the platform, and that you choose wheels which can be locked to stop the run from rolling into the neighbours’ garden in strong winds!


CORNER SOLUTIONS

If you run out of space in one direction – turn a corner! This amazing feline haven might just be the best thing we’ve ever seen!  The different resting places, the play tunnels, the toys, the decorative pebbled outline – who wouldn’t want to spend their days here?


Have you got a cat run? Send us photos of your set up, and you can feature in future posts!

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Keeping Your Cat Out of the Christmas Tree

Cats love trees, they love things that hang and dangle, and they love shiny objects. With this said it’s not difficult to understand how your beautifully decorated Christmas Tree will seem like a wonderful playground to your furry friend. But a toppled tree will not only make a lot of mess, it can also hurt your cat, so it’s best to do everything you can to keep your curious cat away from your holiday evergreen. Here are our best tips:

Choose the right tree and the right position

If you’re having a real tree, choose one with sharp needles, like a Scots Pine, that the cat will want to keep their paws far away from. Hoover up the fallen pine needles every day, as they can cause serious pain if they get stuck between paw pads. 

Place the tree somewhere away from bookcases, sofas and other furniture that the cats might use as a platform to pounce from. 

Secure the tree

To make sure the tree doesn’t topple over and fall if the cats were to get hold of it, make sure you choose a stand with a wide base that can take some potential swinging. Depending on your set up, you might also be able to tie a piece of strong fishing line to the top of the tree and connect it to the ceiling. 

Don’t tempt fate

When you’re at work, or in bed, close the door to the room with the tree to stop the cat from playing with it. Ideally you will be able to give the cat access to the rest of the house, but if you have to lock them in a room, make sure it’s big enough for them and that they have everything they need.

Go top heavy on the ornaments

Try not to place too many ornaments at the bottom of the tree where you cat can reach, especially not ones that are precious to you, or that would automatically break if they fell off. One idea is to get ornaments that make noises, like bells, and place them on the lower half of the tree. Not only will this potentially stop your cat from going further up the tree, you will also hear when the cat has approached, and can interfere before any damage is done. 

You can also secure ornaments by using wire hangers, or plier ones that you can clamp around the branch. These will be more difficult for your cat to pull off. 

Things cats don’t like

Cats hate the scent of oranges, so to discourage them from approaching the tree, you can put orange peels around the base. You can also wrap tin foil around the trunk of the tree. Cats don’t like the sensation of putting their paws on it or the crinkling noise it makes. This works better if you have a kitten or a younger cat, but it’s worth trying. 

Secure the electrics

Some cats will nibble on the cables to the lights, which can hurt them or become potential fire hazards. Consider investing in pet-proof cord protectors, use duct tape to secure the cables to the floor or the wall, or use battery powered lights without long cables. 

Skip the tinsel

Don’t use tinsel if you have a cat in the house. Tinsel is extremely attractive to cats, and they will pull it down and spread it all over the house. If ingested, it can also cause the cat serious injuries, so it’s best avoided.


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Gift Guide – For the Crazy Cat People

Is your friend or someone in your family what some might refer to as a crazy cat person? These people will no doubt appreciate gifts for their cats just as much as something meant directly for them. So if you’re struggling to find something to get for a feline fancier, here are some purrfect gifts!

Indoor Cat House Maya Nook with wardrobe and curtains

Does your mum come down to breakfast in the morning complaining about how the cat kept her up all night moving around on the bed? If you treat her to the luxury indoor cat house Maya Nook this Christmas, the cat will get a secure den of their own to sleep in, and your mum’s beauty sleep won’t be disturbed. The optional curtains are not just a beautiful decorative touch, they also provide the cat with a secluded space to fully relax in. Choose the stylish charcoal grey fabric, or use our custom made pattern and a Christmassy fabric of your choice to add a festive touch to the home.

The practical wardrobe for the Maya Nook can be used to store all things cat, like toys, food, treats and grooming products, so that clearing up for that Christmas party will be quicker than ever. 

Star buy! The Maya Nook Curtains and Bed ( 24″) plus a small Igloo scratching post makes a great bundle for a new Nook. Was £57.98, now £45.99. Buy it here!

Balcony Run

Urban cats rarely get to roam the streets at their leisure, due to all kinds of city dangers. Does your cat loving friend however still want their cat to breathe fresh air, hear bird song and feel the breeze in their fur? Then the Cat Balcony Enclosure might be the best gift they have ever received. This balcony run provides a fully secure and escape proof space for the cat to enjoy, fits all types of balconies, and is big enough for your friend to spend time together with their cat outside in the sunshine. 

Beds

The perfect present for that cat lover who already has everything! The deep filled Maya Cat Bed is the ultimate bed for the Nook, but we have plenty of other beds to choose from. The Dream Paws Cosy bed combines maximum comfort with effortless style, and the Banbury & Co Luxury Cat Cosy Bed is the ultimate place for cats to curl up in on those chilly December nights.

Stocking

Cat people will love any chance to include their furbabies in the festivities, and a perfect way of doing this is giving the pets their own stocking on Christmas morning. This luxurious stocking with a cute cat design can be filled with a fun selection of goodies from our Christmas Shop that will get all notoriously grumpy cats purring with festive joy!

Toys 

If you got the cat in the office for Secret Santa, we’ve got you sorted! We have cat toys for all budgets and occasions. Get them moving with a wand toy, or see them transform under the influence of catnip, ideal for keeping four-legged friends entertained during the holidays. 

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What to do if Your Cat Goes Missing

Contact neighbours to check sheds and garages

Before you go for a full search party, try contacting your neighbours and ask them to check their garages and sheds to see if your cat has accidentally got locked in. As you’re walking around the neighbourhood, call the cat’s name and listen out if you can hear a cry from any garages. 

Make sure someone is home 

If you don’t have a cat flap, make sure someone is at home while you’re out searching just in case your cat decides to come back. Some cats do just like to go for a walkabout for a few days. If the weather takes a turn and it starts to rain, it can be heartbreaking to think of your pet out in the cold weather, but actually bad weather can help as it will drive your cat home as it seeks shelter. 

Go out searching

If you know your cat, you will know where their favourite hang out is. Make sure you head along to their most frequented spots and take a box of treats with you to loudly shake and call their name. 

Put up posters

Make sure you put up posters locally, including lampposts, notice boards in shops and post through peoples doors to spread the word and make them more aware. 

Make sure they are collared and chipped

If your cat is chipped, then if they’re taken to a vets the vet can call you and reunite you asap. If they are not, make sure you call all of the local vets and check your cat hasn’t been brought in. 

Social media

Put up a post on your social media similar to your physical poster and ask friends and family to share it. Also message your local community Facebook groups to get them to post about the missing cat. 

Let your other cat help

If you have another cat, it can be tempting to keep them locked in whilst the other one is missing due to your worry. Don’t do this! Make sure your other cat is allowed out exploring as they normally do, more often than not they will lead you to your other cat who might potentially be trapped or injured. Also if you follow your other cat it will give you an idea where they normally spend their days. 

Use smart front door cameras

Front door cameras such as Nest and Ring will often pick up any movement going past their house including animals. Check with your neighbours if anyone has one and ask them to look at motion alerts from the time you last saw your cat. 

If you move house

To avoid your cat getting lost when you move house,  keep them indoors for at least 3 weeks to avoid them getting disoriented or trying to head back to their previous territory. This time indoors allows them to settle and regard the new house as ‘home’ marking their scent. 

You can also rub butter on your cats paws on the first day you arrive, instead of stressing and trying to dart out the door your cat will enjoy sitting down and licking the butter off its paws thereby slowly becoming familiar with their surroundings. 

Whilst they’re kept indoors, keep sprinkling some of their used cat litter around the garden so that it warns off other cats and also is a familiar scent for them when you do let them outdoors. Once you do let them out, do it just before a usual mealtime, if they’re hungry they will more likely come back to the sound of dinner rattling in the box or packet.

The need and want to return to their old home can be very strong for a cat, particularly if the house isn’t very far away. Make sure the new owners have your contact details in case your cat returns. 

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How To Make Sure Your Cat Keeps Warm This Winter

Some cats would rather have an early night on a warm sofa than a long night out on the tiles. The Persian, the Ragdoll and the Russian Blue, for example, all view the world beyond the window as a hazard rather than something irresistible on the other side of the cat flap.

Breeds such as the hairless Sphynx and the thin-coated Cornish Rex and Devon Rex struggle at both ends of the weather scale, burning in strong sunlight and shivering in the cold.

Other breeds, such as Burmese, Korat and Siamese love being outside and will soon become stressed and destructive if forced to live behind closed doors.

Many others mix and match as the mood takes them. For example, you’ll never see an Abyssinian cat more content than when she’s curled up in a favourite armchair – until you’ve seen her rolling blissfully on the lawn.

But no matter where your feline friend sits on the Coach Potato/Great Outdoors scale, one thing they all love is warmth. For an outdoor cat in the UK this is no problem from – let’s be optimistic – the back end of March to the middle of October. But when the temperature drops and the frosty mornings bite, every cat needs somewhere to warm its paws.

An Indoor Haven

You don’t need to have the central heating blasting out to keep your cat from shivering. A cosy spot to curl up in, away from drafts, hustle and bustle, will do the trick. It could be something as simple as a box with a blanket, or a safe space under the cupboard – or even on top of it. Best of all, a tailor-made cat bed will maximise cosiness and heat retention.

Another custom-made option is the Maya Nook. This transforms your cat’s cosy corner into a piece of attractive furniture, providing snuggling space for your pets, and with curtains that keep it all nice and private. The Maya Nook also has an optional wardrobe attachment, for keeping cat food, toys and other feline bits and pieces tidied away.

Even without the heating cranked up, the enclosed nature of the Maya Nook makes it the perfect hot spot at any time of the year.

An Outdoor Haven

If you have the kind of cat who craves the outdoors no matter what the weather, and who sometimes likes to sleep rough in the garden, there are things you can do to make their life a little comfier.

A box-with-a-blanket in a shed or other outbuilding, or a covered area in a quiet corner, can all give the bare minimum of cosiness that no outdoor cat can resist. Even a little dry area under a trampoline or climbing frame can do the trick.

If you have an Omlet Cat Run, you can put a covered snoozing area in one of the corners. That keeps things snug and safe for a cat who likes being outside, but who has a tendency to disappear or wonder into danger.

If your cat still suffers the shivers in winter, you could buy a cat jacket. These can be particularly useful for hairless breeds such as the Sphynx.

Best of all, though, there is that perennial favourite warm spot that can help a cat through the longest of winters – your lap!

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15 Signs That Your Cat Loves You

Cats have a reputation for being aloof, and for not getting over-excited when they see you. All this really means is that they’re not like dogs! Cats actually form very strong bonds with their beloved owners, and the subtlety of their affection is all part of the feline charm. So, you know it’s true love if your cat…

1. Greets you when you open the door.

The welcoming meow, the erect tale, the eager trot towards you… if that’s not a happy cat, we don’t know what is! Some cats even acquire an uncanny knack for predicting your arrival, sitting by door or window and waiting for you before there’s any sight or sound of you in the street. But you’ll need to verify that psychic trick with one of the other humans in the house…

2. Enjoys being stroked.

While it’s true that some cats just love being stroked no matter who’s doing the stroking, many don’t like being manhandled at all. If your cat shies away from an over-friendly stranger or discourages them with a claw or two, but lets you stroke her, that’s definitely love.

3. Grooms you.

You might not particularly like being licked by your cat’s sandpaper-like tongue, but it’s a sign of affection nonetheless. It means your cat sees you as her family, a parent figure.

4. Gazes at you.

If your cat looks into your eyes without turning away, she is completely relaxed in your company. A long, slow blink is a good sign too. A cat will normally interpret staring as a sign of aggression, and will look away (or run away). If she’s relaxed enough to meet your gaze lovingly, take it as a great compliment!

5. Head-butts you.

Cats rub against humans and furniture with little discrimination. However, a full-on head-butt rub is a sign of affection, and doesn’t just mean she wants some food!

6. Brings you presents.

Okay, this isn’t your cat’s most endearing habit, but the ‘gift’ of rodents – dead, half-dead or very much alive – is a sign that they feel secure and at home, according to some experts. There’s also a school of thought that interprets it as affection. Sort of. It’s something a mother cat would do for her kittens, teaching them how to handle prey.

7. Meows a lot.

Cats are thought to have a special ‘meow’ for humans. If your cat mews, gurgles and vocalises a lot in your presence, she’s telling you how much she loves you.

8. Gives you the twitchy tail treatment.

When your cat walks up to you, tail erect and twitching, she’s letting you know how pleased she is to see you. Sometimes it’s because she knows its food time, but it’s often simple affection.

9. Falls asleep on you.

Cats are always wary, and need to feel super-secure when choosing a sleeping spot. If they choose you as their bed, take it as a sign of complete trust and contentment.

10. Sticks her bottom in your face.

Cats have scent glands on their rear ends, a kind of scented ID. If your pet presents you with her behind, it means you’re a friend. Don’t feel you have to reciprocate, though…

11. Shows her belly.

A cat that rolls on its back and invites you to rub its tummy is very chilled, and views you as a friend and playmate. But that doesn’t mean she won’t use her claws in the belly-rubbing game that follows, so watch out!

12. Purrrrrrrrrs!

Cats purr for their kittens, and for their human friends. No on else.

13. Gently nibbles you.

The soft nibble of a friendly cat is very different from an aggressive bite. Some cats use this oral greeting as a means of bonding with their human friends. Some owners, however, discourage it, as even a gentle nibble can be a little uncomfortable if the cat gets over enthusiastic.

14. Follows at your heels.

If it’s not food time, this behaviour is a sign of pure affection. The cat simply wants to be with you. Some cats tag along with their owners outdoors, and many are very happy to follow their best friends to bed. Once you’ve let them adopt this habit, it’s a hard one to break!

15. Kneads you.

If your cat needs you, she may also knead you… This behaviour is thought to originate in kittens, pawing their mums to stimulate milk flow. If your cat does it to you, take it as a sign of affection, bonding and trust. Love, in other words!

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