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Category Archives: Guinea Pigs

Getting a Guinea Pig? Here’s everything you need!

Guinea pigs are fun, quirky companions for people of all ages and make fantastic pets. Though small, these little animals have bags of character and very distinct, individual personalities. If you’re thinking of bringing some guinea pigs into your home, you’ll be rewarded by conversational squeaks, affectionate nuzzling, and the comical sight of your pets devouring hay and vegetables like there’s no tomorrow. If you’re already an owner, then you’ll know firsthand what enjoyable and easy pets they are to look after. 

If you are thinking of getting a guinea pig here’s a checklist of everything you need to keep your new pet happy and healthy! 

1 – A friend

Guinea pigs are very sociable animals, and will need to live together with a friend, or else they will get very depressed. Siblings of the same sex is normally the best combination, but males of different ages normally get along well as long as there are no females around. If you’re planning to keep a male and a female guinea pig together and don’t want plenty of guinea pig babies you must make sure to get the male castrated.

2 – A safe and dry house

Your guinea pigs will need a hutch to live in, even if you intend to keep them in your home. Whether you opt for a modern hutch like our Eglu Go Guinea Pig Hutch, or a traditional wooden hutch is up to you, but which hutch and run you choose, and where you keep it, requires some careful thought.

A good hutch is vital to a guinea pigs’ wellbeing. It’s their home, and where they’ll spend the vast majority of their time. Well-made hutches provide a secure environment for your guinea pigs to sleep, socialise, and exercise, and a good hutch can last you and your pets many years, especially if you invest in a solid, robust model.

The Eglu Go Hutch is the simple, stylish, straightforward way to keep pets. Suitable for two to three guinea pigs, this will make a wonderful home for your new friends. It has been designed to enable your pet guinea pigs to express their natural instincts, offering them a fun environment that will make them feel really at home.  

3 – Space to run around and play

Guinea pigs love exercise and space to play, so they need to spend time in their run each day. If your guinea pig hutch has a run attached, like the Eglu Go Guinea Pig Hutch, simply open the door to the run when you bring your guinea pigs their food in the morning. If your hutch doesn’t have a run attached, then it’s a good idea to give your guinea pigs an opportunity to stretch their legs each day by purchasing a standalone guinea pig run. If your run is outside then, weather permitting, your guinea pigs would like to be be put out there each morning and brought back each evening. Take this opportunity for a cuddle!

You can enhance their living space by providing Guinea pig activity tunnels linking hutches to runs and playpens. It’s a practical add-on that appeals to the animal’s instincts too – in the wild they are wary of open spaces, darting for cover under a bush or in a grass tunnel, whenever they sense danger.

The Zippi Guinea Pig Tunnel System is custom made with all this in mind – something that keeps the Guinea pigs happy at an instinctive level, while providing a practical addition to your set up, and bringing hours of fun for the family. The Zippi’s Guinea pig burrow pipes connect all the different areas used by your pets. Its Guinea pig hutch connector is suitable for whatever house you have provided for your pets – whether that’s The Eglu Go Hutch, a traditional wooden hutch, or something you’ve put together yourself. It connects very handily to The Zippi Playpens and Runs and The Omlet’s Outdoor Pet Runs.

4 – Food and Water

Guinea Pigs need constant access to food, so make sure you refill their dry dry food bowl twice a day. Fill their hay rack and cut up some fresh fruit and veg for them to munch on. Be sure to keep their water bottle nice and fresh, too.

 

Guinea pigs will eat virtually anything! As well as grass in the summer, they can be given a variety of wild plants such as dandelions, plantains, chickweed and milk thistle. When wild plants are not available they can be given vegetables, herbs and fruit. The key is to introduce as many different fresh foods when they are young, as they may be reluctant to try something new as they get older. Do however stay away from potatoes, onions, raw beans and beetroot, as well as anything bloating. 

Hay is another important daily component of their diet. Only the best quality hay should be fed, and it should not be either dusty or mouldy. If you have somewhere to store it, it is often worthwhile to buy a bale from a farm, of a quality that would be fed to horses. As well as eating it, they will snuggle under it for warmth. Straw should not be used; it has no nutritional value, and the sharpness of its stalks often causes eye injuries as the guinea pigs burrow around in it.

5 – Vitamin C

The most important fact to know about guinea pigs is that, like us humans, they need a daily intake of Vitamin C. This can be provided by providing a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables. Most good guinea pig dry mixes now also contain vitamin C. Carrots and Broccoli are great sources of vitamin C, and a carrot a day keeps the vet away!

6 – And finally……..a routine!

Guinea pigs soon get used to a routine, and will reward you with welcoming squeaks as soon as they hear you open your back door. It is important to check on your guinea pigs at least twice a day, in the morning and evening. However guinea pigs love human company and the more time you can spend with them the happier they are.

For further information about Guinea Pigs, please read our guide here

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12 facts you might not know about your Guinea pig!

1)

Guinea Pigs are not pigs but, rather, rodents. They are also not from Guinea; they originated in the Andes mountains of South America

2)

A male is called a boar; females are sows and babies are referred to as pups.

3)

“Pups” are born with fur and their eyes open.

4)

A healthy weight of a Guinea pig is between 700 and 1200g (1.5 – 2.5lbs)

5)

Guinea pigs are around 20 and 25 cm long (8 – 10 inches)

6)
The life span of a guinea pig is between 4 – 7 years
7)

They have 4 toes on their front feet but only 3 on their back ones

8)

Their teeth continue growing throughout their lives which is why it’s important for them to constantly gnaw on the things they like to eat so they wear their teeth down

9)

Guinea pigs only sleep for about four hours during a 24- hour period and usually nap from between 20 seconds to six minutes.

10)

Guinea pigs are extremely vocal and have a broad range of sounds which include purring, whining, shrieking, cooing, rumbling, hissing and teeth chattering.

11)
They are very social animals and they are much happier when kept in pairs or groups
12)

All breeds of Guinea pigs have five different types of hair that make up their coat.

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The Danish Championships for Guinea Pigs 2018

Last month, the Danish championships for guinea pigs were held in Copenhagen.  The championships were hosted by Dansk Marsvineklub (The Danish Guinea Pig Association). The association’s purpose is to spread knowledge about the animals, and how to best care for and feed them and shows are held throughout the country where members meet up and exhibit their animals.

There were 3 main classes:

  • Pure bred: Judged by the standard for each breed, for example whether the hair is properly coloured, if the eyes and ears are large and are placed correctly etc.
  • Pets: All animals are welcome and emphasis is placed on the animal’s general condition, well-being and temperament. Denmark is known for the best pets throughout the Nordic region. We will return to this point…
  • Juniors: A class for exhibitors under the age of 15. Same requirements as for the pets class, however, here emphasis is also placed on the interaction between children and animals and the child’s knowledge of the daily care

In addition, there are also some “for fun” competitions:

  • Dress up competition
  • Cucumber eating 
  • Weight competition

 

WINNER OF THE DRESS UP COMPETITION

The winner of the dress up competition was 5 month old Bluebells Teddiursa who was dressed as a dinosaur!

Here’s some of the other dress up entries!

 

WINNER OF THE CUCUMBER-EATING COMPETITION

How did you prepare for this competition?

“The animals feel safe with us – this is the theory. They feel so safe when we’re standing down there at the table. So they come to us and because they know we’re there and looking after them, they just dare to sit and eat and relax. Even the little one there who’s 2 months old, he was number 3 in the competition. We were number 1, 2 and 3 – and that happens almost every time. We take the guinea pigs up and feed them every day, they’re real pets! So you could say that we are practicing every day.”
This family (mother and two sons) were number 1, 2 and 3 in the cucumber-eating competition this year. The boys are both 14 years old, so it’s the final year that they’re allowed to compete in the junior class. Next year they have to compete with the pets. How do they feel about this?
“Well we’re already allowed to compete with the pets now – it’s only the adults that can’t compete with the juniors.”
The family has only once returned home from a guinea pig show without the cucumber-eating rosette.
“This was in February. Their favourite guinea pig was ill and they decided that she should be allowed to compete in the cucumber competition one last time, even though they knew she probably wouldn’t win it.”

 

You can learn more about Guinea Pigs by reading the Omlet Guinea Pig Guide here

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Pet of the Month: Badger and Melanie

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Meet Badger and Melanie, our Pets of the Month for June! These adorable Guinea Pigs belong to our Omlet Graphic Designer, Jen.

She got Badger from a pet shop 2 years ago and Melanie was from a rescue centre a year later, they’ve been inseparable ever since.

Jen said she was looking for a pair of pigs but felt too guilty leaving Badger in the pet shop after buying his brothers Oink and Pearl so she bought him too.
“Badger tended to get bullied though so we decided to separate him from the others and buy him a girlfriend.”
“Badger is a bit pathetic and makes a terrible fuss about things but is very affectionate, Melanie is rather quite and content but does put Badger in his place when he is flapping and annoying her.”
Here at Omlet HQ we find it quite difficult to tell them apart (is it Badger on the left…?) but Jen said that it’s easy to tell the difference as Badger squeals all the time. He’s also very smooth despite his hair lying in the wrong direction whereas Melanie is wirey, fuzzy and big.

They like hay and green vegetables and spend the majority of their time climbing up a ramp in and out of their hutch and jumping onto the roof of their sleeping pods. SO CUTE! <3

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